Colin P Derdeyn

Washington University in St. Louis, San Luis, Missouri, United States

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Publications (289)1336.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Acute ischemic stroke is caused by occlusion of a cerebral artery, resulting in loss of brain tissue and neurologic deficits. However, a portion of the ischemic brain can be salvaged if blood flow is restored within an appropriate time frame. The past year has seen the publication of five positive randomized controlled trials demonstrating substantial benefit of mechanical thrombectomy in select patients with large vessel cerebrovascular occlusion. This progress is related to several factors, but most importantly, dramatic improvements in speed and rates of recanalization with the latest generation devices. In this article, we review the evolution of endovascular AIS therapies and key design features of the most widely used devices.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Expert Review of Medical Devices
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE Internal carotid artery (ICA) injury is a rare but severe complication of endonasal surgery. The authors describe their endovascular experience managing ICA injuries after transsphenoidal surgery; they review and summarize the current literature regarding endovascular techniques; and they propose a treatment algorithm based on the available evidence. METHODS A retrospective review of 576 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resections was performed. Cases of ICA injury occurring at our institution and transfers from other hospitals were evaluated. Endovascular treatments for ICA injury reported in the literature were also reviewed and summarized. RESULTS Seven cases were identified from the institutional cohort (mean age 46.3 years, mean follow-up 43.4 months [1-107 months]) that received endovascular treatment for ICA injury. Five injuries occurred at our institution (5 [0.9%] of 576), and 2 injuries occurred at outside hospitals. Three patients underwent ICA sacrifice by coil placement, 2 underwent lesion embolization (coil or stent-assisted coil placement), and 2 underwent endoluminal reconstruction (both with flow diversion devices). Review of the literature identified 98 cases of ICA injury treated with endovascular methods. Of the 105 total cases, 46 patients underwent ICA sacrifice, 28 underwent lesion embolization, and 31 underwent endoluminal reconstruction. Sacrifice of the ICA proved a durable solution in all cases; however, the rate of persistent neurological complications was relatively high (10 [21.7%] of 46). Lesion embolization was primarily performed by coil embolization without stenting (16 cases) and stent-assisted coiling (9 cases). Both techniques had a relatively high rate of at least some technical complication (6 [37.5%] of 16 and 5 [55.6%] of 9, respectively) and major technical complications (i.e., injury, new neurological deficit, or ICA sacrifice) (5 [31.3%] of 16 and 2 [22.2%] of 9, respectively). Endoluminal reconstruction was performed by covered stent (24 cases) and flow diverter (5 cases) placement. Covered stents showed a reasonably high rate of technical complications (10 [41.7%] of 24); however, 8 of these problems were resolved, leaving a small percentage with major technical complications (2 [8.3%] of 24). Flow diverter placement was also well tolerated, with only 1 minor technical complication. CONCLUSIONS Endovascular treatments including vessel sacrifice, coil embolization (with or without stent assistance), and endoluminal reconstruction offer a tailored approach to ICA injury management after endonasal surgery. Vessel sacrifice remains the definitive treatment for acute, uncontrolled bleeding; however, vessel preservation techniques should be considered carefully in select patients. Multiple factors including vascular anatomy, injury characteristics, and risk of dual antiplatelet therapy should guide best treatment, but more study is needed (particularly with flow diverters) to refine this decision-making process. Ideally, all endovascular treatment options should be available at institutions performing endonasal surgery.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: As healthcare delivery in the USA transforms into a model that at its core requires value-based considerations, ischemic stroke is confronted by intersecting forces. Modern techniques allow rapid revascularization in the majority of patients with large vessel occlusions. Dramatic advances in the evidentiary basis for mechanical embolectomy are increasing the number of patients treated with this therapy. A key part of the therapeutic arsenal in many patients treated with interventional techniques has been concurrent intravenous thrombolysis. We consider whether this paradigm warrants change.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Importance The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) Trial showed that aggressive medical therapy was more effective than stenting for preventing stroke in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. However, 15% of patients in the medical group still experienced a primary end point during a median follow-up of 32.7 months.Objective To determine baseline features that were associated with a high rate of a primary end point in the medical arm of the SAMMPRIS Trial.Design, Setting, and Participants A post hoc analysis of patients in the medical arm only of the SAMMPRIS trial. Enrollment occurred between October 2008 and April 2013 and included 227 patients randomized to medical management alone. Baseline demographic features, vascular risk factors, qualifying event, brain imaging, and angiographic features were analyzed. Bivariate and multivariable proportional hazard regression modeling was performed to relate baseline features to the time until a primary end point. The post hoc analysis was conducted from November 2014 to June 2015.Interventions The SAMMPRIS Trial compared stenting with aggressive medical management in patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack attributed to 70% to 99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery.Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was any of the following: stroke or death within 30 days of enrollment, ischemic stroke in the territory of the symptomatic intracranial artery beyond 30 days after enrollment, or any stroke or death within 30 days after stenting a patient in the medical group during follow-up.Results A total of 227 patients were included in the study, 82 of whom were female, and the mean (SD) age was 59.5 (11.8) years. Being female (hazard ratio [HR], 1.9; 95% CI, 0.96-3.7), having diabetes mellitus (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.9-3.5), not taking a statin at enrollment (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7), stroke as the qualifying event (HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.03-6.0), Rankin grade of 1 or greater (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 0.9-5.5), old infarct in the territory of the stenotic artery (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.1), and greater than 80% stenosis (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9-3.7) were associated (P < .10) with higher risk on bivariate analysis. Factors that were significantly associated with a primary end point on multivariable analyses were old infarct in the territory (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.3; P = .006), stroke as the qualifying event (HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.1-7.7; P = .03), and no statin use at enrollment (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1-5.2; P = .03).Conclusions and Relevance Old infarct in the territory of the stenosis, new stroke presentation, and absence of statin use at enrollment were independently associated with high rates of the primary end point in the medical group in the SAMMPRIS Trial. These features may be useful for selecting high-risk patients for future clinical trials evaluating alternative therapies for intracranial stenosis.Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:NCT00576693
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    ABSTRACT: Importance Atherosclerotic vertebrobasilar (VB) occlusive disease is a significant etiology of posterior circulation stroke, with regional hypoperfusion as an important potential contributor to stroke risk.Objective To test the hypothesis that, among patients with symptomatic VB stenosis or occlusion, those with distal blood flow compromise as measured by large-vessel quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) are at higher risk of subsequent posterior circulation stroke.Design, Setting, and Participants A prospective, blinded, longitudinal cohort study was conducted at 5 academic hospital-based centers in the United States and Canada; 82 patients from inpatient and outpatient settings were enrolled. Participants with recent VB transient ischemic attack or stroke and 50% or more atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion in vertebral and/or basilar arteries underwent large-vessel flow measurement in the VB territory using QMRA. Physicians performing follow-up assessments were blinded to QMRA flow status. Follow-up included monthly telephone calls for 12 months and biannual clinical visits (for a minimum of 12 months, and up to 24 months or the final visit). Enrollment took place from July 1, 2008, to July 31, 2013, with study completion on June 30, 2014; data analysis was performed from October 1, 2014, to April 10, 2015.Exposure Standard medical management of stroke risk factors.Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was VB-territory stroke.Results Of the 82 enrolled patients, 72 remained eligible after central review of their angiograms. Sixty-nine of 72 patients completed the minimum 12-month follow-up; median follow-up was 23 (interquartile range, 14-25) months. Distal flow status was low in 18 of the 72 participants (25%) included in the analysis and was significantly associated with risk for a subsequent VB stroke (P = .04), with 12- and 24-month event-free survival rates of 78% and 70%, respectively, in the low-flow group vs 96% and 87%, respectively, in the normal-flow group. The hazard ratio, adjusted for age and stroke risk factors, in the low distal flow status group was 11.55 (95% CI, 1.88-71.00; P = .008). Medical risk factor management at 6-month intervals was similar between patients with low and normal distal flow. Distal flow status remained significantly associated with risk even when controlling for the degree of stenosis and location.Conclusions and Relevance Distal flow status determined using a noninvasive and practical imaging tool is robustly associated with risk for subsequent stroke in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic VB occlusive disease. Identification of high-risk patients has important implications for future investigation of more aggressive interventional or medical therapies.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Statins may promote vasodilation following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and improve the response to blood pressure elevation. We sought to determine whether simvastatin increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and alters the response to induced hypertension after SAH. Methods: Statin-naïve patients admitted <72 h after WFNS ≥2 aneurysmal SAH were randomly assigned to 80 mg simvastatin/day or placebo for 21 days. Regional CBF was measured with quantitative (15)O PET on SAH day 7-10 before and after raising mean arterial pressure (MAP) 20-25 %. Autoregulatory index (AI) was calculated as the ratio of % change in resistance (MAP/CBF) to % change in MAP. Angiography was performed within 24 h of PET. Results are presented as simvastatin vs. placebo. Results: Thirteen patients received simvastatin and 12 placebo. Clinical characteristics were similar. Moderate or severe angiographic vasospasm occurred in 42 vs. 45 % and delayed cerebral ischemia in 14 vs. 55 % (p = 0.074). During PET studies, MAP (110 ± 10 vs. 111 ± 12), global CBF (41 ± 12 vs. 43 ± 13), and CVR (2.95 ± 1.0 vs. 2.81 ± 1.0) did not differ at baseline. When MAP was raised to 135 ± 7 mm Hg vs. 137 ± 15, global CBF did not change. Global AI did not differ (107 ± 59 vs. 0. 89 ± 52 %, p = 0.68). CBF did not change in regions with low baseline flow or in regions supplied by vessels with angiographic vasospasm in either group. Six-month modified Rankin Scale scores did not differ. Conclusions: Our data indicate that initiation of therapy with high-dose simvastatin does not alter baseline CBF or response to induced hypertension.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Neurocritical Care
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    Colin P. Derdeyn · Joseph P. Broderick · Karen Furie

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: Importance Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) and small vessel disease (SVD) may coexist. There are limited data on the frequency and risk factors for coexistent SVD and the effect of SVD on stroke recurrence in patients receiving medical treatment for ICAS.Objective To investigate the frequency and risk factors for SVD and the effect of SVD on stroke recurrence in patients with ICAS.Design, Setting, and Participants A post hoc analysis of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) study, a prospective, multicenter clinical trial. Among 451 participants, 313 (69.4%) had baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging scans read centrally for SVD that was defined by any of the following: old lacunar infarction, grade 2 to 3 on the Fazekas scale (for high-grade white matter hyperintensities), or microbleeds. Patient enrollment in SAMMPRIS began November 25, 2008, and follow-up ended on April 30, 2013. Data analysis for the present study was performed from May 13, 2014, to July 29, 2015.Main Outcomes and Measures Risk factors in patients with vs without SVD and the association between SVD and other baseline risk factors with any ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke in the territory of the stenotic artery determined using proportional hazards regression.Results Of 313 patients, 155 individuals (49.5%) had SVD noted on baseline magnetic resonance imaging. Variables that were significantly higher in patients with SVD, reported as mean (SD), included age, 63.5 (10.5) years (P < .001), systolic blood pressure, 149 (22) mm Hg (P < .001), glucose level, 130 (50) mg/dL (P = .03), and lower Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores (median, ≥24 [interquartile range, 20-26]; P = .02).Other significant variables were the number of patients with diabetes mellitus (88 of 155 [56.8%]; P = .003), coronary artery disease (46 [29.7%]; P = .004), stroke before the qualifying event (59 [38.1%]; P < .001), old infarct in the territory of the stenotic intracranial artery (88 [56.8%]; P < .001), and receiving antithrombotic therapy at the time of the qualifying event (109 [70.3%]; P = .005). The association between SVD and any ischemic stroke was nearly significant in the direction of a higher risk (18 [23.7%]); P = .07) for patients with SVD. On bivariate analysis, SVD was not associated with an increased risk on multivariable analyses (hazard ratio, 1.7 [95% CI, 0.8-3.8]; P = .20). In addition, SVD was not associated with an increased risk of stroke in the territory on either bivariate or multivariable analyses.Conclusions and Relevance Although SVD is common in patients with ICAS, the presence of SVD on baseline magnetic resonance imaging is not independently associated with an increased risk of stroke in patients with ICAS.Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT00576693
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Nonhemorrhagic neurological deficits are underrecognized symptoms of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) having cortical venous drainage. These symptoms are the consequence of cortical venous hypertension and portend a clinical course with increased risk of neurological morbidity and mortality. One rarely documented and easily misinterpreted type of nonhemorrhagic neurological deficit is progressive dementia, which can result from venous hypertension in the cortex or in bilateral thalami. The latter, which is due to dAVF drainage into the deep venous system, is the less common of these 2 dementia syndromes. Herein, the authors report 4 cases of dAVF with venous drainage into the vein of Galen causing bithalamic edema and rapidly progressive dementia. Two patients were treated successfully with endovascular embolization, and the other 2 patients were treated successfully with endovascular embolization followed by surgery. The radiographic abnormalities and presenting symptoms rapidly resolved after dAVF obliteration in all 4 cases. Detailed descriptions of these 4 cases are presented along with a critical review of 15 previously reported cases. In our analysis of these 19 published cases, the following were emphasized: 1) the clinical and radiographic differences between dAVF-induced thalamic versus cortical dementia syndromes; 2) the differential diagnosis and necessary radiographic workup for patients presenting with a rapidly progressive thalamic dementia syndrome; 3) the frequency at which delays in diagnosis occurred and potentially dangerous and avoidable diagnostic procedures were used; and 4) the rapidity and completeness of symptom resolution following dAVF treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The role of physician experience and patient volumes on the outcome of surgical or endovascular procedures has been well-studied but there are limited data on how these factors affect the outcome of medical therapy. Methods: In the stenting and medical cohorts of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for the Prevention of Recurrent Ischemic Stroke (SAMMPRIS) trial, we compared Kaplan-Meier (K-M) curves for the primary endpoint (any stroke or death within 30 days of enrollment or ischemic stroke in the territory beyond 30 days) using the log-rank test and the percentages of patients achieving target levels for primary and secondary risk factors during the study using Fisher exact test between patients at high-enrolling (≥12 patients) vs low-enrolling (<12 patients) sites. Results: In the stenting group, the K-M curves for the primary endpoint were similar at high-enrolling sites and low-enrolling sites (p = 0.93) with rates of 13.5% vs 14.7% at 30 days and 19.0% vs 20.6% at 2 years. In the medical group, the K-M curves differed between high-enrolling sites and low-enrolling sites (p = 0.0005) with rates of 1.8% vs 9.8% at 30 days and 7.3% vs 20.9% at 2 years. The percentages of patients who achieved targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure at high- vs low-enrolling sites in both treatment groups combined were 64% vs 49% (p = 0.003) and 70% vs 59% (p = 0.026), respectively. Conclusions: High-enrolling sites in SAMMPRIS achieved better control of primary risk factors and much lower rates of the primary endpoint than low-enrolling sites in the medical group, suggesting that experience with medical management is an important determinant of patient outcome.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Neurology
  • Charlene J Ong · Chester K Yarbrough · Colin P Derdeyn

    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: A variant of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (PSAH) has been described characterized by blood centered in the quadrigeminal cistern and limited to the superior vermian and perimesencephalic cisterns. Herein, three cases of quadrigeminal PSAH are presented. Medical records of all patients who underwent digital subtraction angiography for evaluation of non-traumatic SAH between July 2002 and April 2012 were reviewed. Patients with anterior circulation aneurysms were excluded. Two blinded reviewers identified admission noncontrast CT scans with pretruncal and quadrigeminal patterns of PSAH. The total cohort included 106 patients: 53% (56/106) with one or more negative digital subtraction angiograms and 47% (50/106) with posterior circulation or posterior communicating artery aneurysms. Three patients with quadrigeminal PSAH were identified, two with nonaneurysmal SAH and one with a posterior circulation aneurysm. Seventeen patients (16%; 17/106) with pretruncal PSAH were identified, none of whom were found to have an aneurysm. The quadrigeminal pattern comprised 11% (2/19) of cases of pretruncal or quadrigeminal nonaneurysmal PSAH. A small subset of patients with nonaneurysmal PSAH present with blood centered in the quadrigeminal cistern, and the etiology of this pattern may be similar to that of the classic pretruncal variant. However, patients with quadrigeminal PSAH must still undergo thorough vascular imaging, including at least two digital subtraction angiograms, to exclude a ruptured aneurysm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Clinical neurology and neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: Cerebral arterial vasospasm (CVS) is a common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage strongly associated with neurological deterioration and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). The utility of screening for CVS as a surrogate for early detection of DCI, especially in patients without clinical signs of DCI, remains uncertain. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 116 aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients who underwent screening digital subtraction angiography to determine the association of significant CVS and subsequent development of DCI. Patients were stratified into 3 groups: (1) no symptoms of DCI before screening, (2) ≥1 episodes of suspected DCI symptoms before screening, and (3) unable to detect symptoms because of poor examination. Results: Patients asymptomatic before screening had significantly lower rates of CVS (18%) compared with those with transient symptoms of DCI (60%; P<0.0001). None of the 79 asymptomatic patients developed DCI after screening, regardless of digital subtraction angiography findings, compared with 56% of those with symptoms (P<0.0001). Presence of CVS was significantly associated with DCI in those with transient symptoms and in those whose examinations did not permit clear assessment (odds ratio 16.0, 95% confidence interval 2.2-118.3, P=0.003). Conclusions: Patients asymptomatic before screening have low rates of CVS and seem to be at negligible risk of developing DCI. Routine screening of asymptomatic patients seems to have little utility. Screening may still be considered in patients with possible symptoms of DCI or those with examinations too poor to clinically detect symptoms because finding CVS may be useful for risk stratification and guiding management.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: Stroke affects ≈700 000 patients annually. Recent randomized controlled trials comparing endovascular thrombectomy (ET) with medical therapy, including intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with tissue-type plasminogen activator, have shown effectiveness of ET for some stroke patients. The study objective is to evaluate the effect of ET on good outcome in stroke patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SCOPUS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane databases to identify original research publications between 1996 and 2015 that (1) reported clinical outcomes in patients for stroke at 90 days with the modified Rankin Scale; (2) included at least 10 patients per group; (3) compared outcome with a control arm, and (4) included anterior circulation strokes in each arm. Two authors reviewed articles for inclusion independently. Results: Nine of 23 809 studies met inclusion criteria. In primary analysis, ET was associated with increased odds for good outcome (odds ratio [OR], 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-2.54). In secondary analysis, younger patients (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.50-2.28), older patients (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.10-3.37), patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.46-2.31), patients not receiving intravenous thrombolysis (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 0.86-2.95), patients with worse strokes (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.56-3.18), and patients with more moderate strokes (OR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.36-2.18) had increased odds for good outcome. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were similar between ET and control patients. No evidence of publication bias was seen. Conclusions: ET improves good outcomes after anterior circulation stroke. ET should be strongly considered for all patients presenting within 6 hours of onset with a stroke affecting a proximal, anterior circulation vessel without a contraindication to ET.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: Although the Stenting Versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial showed that medical therapy alone was superior to stenting plus medical therapy for preventing recurrent strokes in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis, we determined whether SAMMPRIS supported the use of stenting in any subpopulations of patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis. Methods: The primary outcome, 30-day stroke and death and later strokes in the territory of the qualifying artery, was compared in those with and without baseline factors in the 2 treatment arms, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) plus aggressive medical therapy versus aggressive medical therapy alone. Baseline factors included sex, age, race, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, lipid disorder, smoking status, type of qualifying event, qualifying event hypoperfusion symptoms, use of antithrombotic or proton pump inhibitor at baseline, days to enrollment, old infarcts in the same territory, percent stenosis, other artery stenosis, and location of the symptomatic artery. Results: A total of 451 patients were enrolled, 227 randomized to aggressive medical therapy and 224 to PTAS. Of all variables evaluated, the observed 2-year event rates were higher with PTAS than with aggressive medical therapy in the vast majority and the interaction with treatment was not statistically significant for any of the factors. Conclusions: The SAMMPRIS results do not provide evidence to support the use of PTAS using the Wingspan stent system compared with medical treatment in any examined subpopulation of patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis, including those with qualifying event hypoperfusion symptoms. Clinical trial registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00576693.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECT Hospital readmission is a common but controversial quality measure increasingly used to influence hospital compensation in the US. The objective of this study was to evaluate the causes for 30-day hospital readmission following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the appropriateness of this performance metric and to identify potential avenues for improved patient care. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who received surgical orendovas-cular treatment for aneurysmal SAH at Barnes-Jewish Hospital between 2003 and 2013. Two senior faculty identified by consensus the primary medical/surgical diagnosis associated with readmission as well as the underlying causes of rehospitalization. RESULTS Among 778 patients treated for aneurysmal SAH, 89 experienced a total of 97 readmission events, yielding a readmission rate of 11.4%. The median time from discharge to readmission was 9 days (interquartile range 3-17.5 days). Actual hydrocephalus or potential concern for hydrocephalus (e.g., headache) was the most frequent diagnosis (26/97, 26.8%), followed by infections (e.g., wound infection [5/97, 5.2%], urinary tract infection [3/97, 3.1%], and pneumonia [3/97, 3.1%]) and thromboembolic events (8/97, 8.2%). In most cases (75/97, 77.3%), we did not identify any treatment lapses contributing to readmission. The most common underlying causes for readmission were unavoidable development of SAH-related pathology (e.g., hydrocephalus; 36/97, 37.1%) and complications related to neurological impairment and immobility (e.g., thromboembolic event despite high-dose chemoprophylaxis; 21/97, 21.6%). The authors determined that 22/97 (22.7%) of the readmissions were likely preventable with alternative management. In these cases, insufficient outpatient medical care (for example, for hyponatremia; 16/97, 16.5%) was the most common shortcoming. CONCLUSIONS Most readmissions after aneurysmal SAH relate to late consequences of hemorrhage, such as hydrocephalus, or medical complications secondary to severe neurological injury. Although a minority of readmissions may potentially be avoided with closer medical follow-up in the transitional care environment, readmission after SAH is an insensitive and likely inappropriate hospital performance metric.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: We endeavored to develop an unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) treatment score (UIATS) model that includes and quantifies key factors involved in clinical decision-making in the management of UIAs and to assess agreement for this model among specialists in UIA management and research. Methods: An international multidisciplinary (neurosurgery, neuroradiology, neurology, clinical epidemiology) group of 69 specialists was convened to develop and validate the UIATS model using a Delphi consensus. For internal (39 panel members involved in identification of relevant features) and external validation (30 independent external reviewers), 30 selected UIA cases were used to analyze agreement with UIATS management recommendations based on a 5-point Likert scale (5 indicating strong agreement). Interrater agreement (IRA) was assessed with standardized coefficients of dispersion (vr*) (vr* 5 0 indicating excellent agreement and vr* 5 1 indicating poor agreement). Results: The UIATS accounts for 29 key factors in UIA management. Agreement with UIATS (mean Likert scores) was 4.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.1–4.3) per reviewer for both reviewer cohorts; agreement per case was 4.3 (95% CI 4.1–4.4) for panel members and 4.5 (95% CI 4.3–4.6) for external reviewers (p 5 0.017). Mean Likert scores were 4.2 (95% CI 4.1–4.3) for interventional reviewers (n 5 56) and 4.1 (95% CI 3.9–4.4) for noninterventional reviewers (n 5 12) (p 5 0.290). Overall IRA (vr*) for both cohorts was 0.026 (95% CI 0.019–0.033). Conclusions: This novel UIA decision guidance study captures an excellent consensus among highly informed individuals on UIA management, irrespective of their underlying specialty. Clinicians can use the UIATS as a comprehensive mechanism for indicating how a large group of specialists might manage an individual patient with a UIA. Neurology 2015;85:881–889.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: We endeavored to develop an unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) treatment score (UIATS) model that includes and quantifies key factors involved in clinical decision-making in the management of UIAs and to assess agreement for this model among specialists in UIA management and research. Methods: An international multidisciplinary (neurosurgery, neuroradiology, neurology, clinical epidemiology) group of 69 specialists was convened to develop and validate the UIATS model using a Delphi consensus. For internal (39 panel members involved in identification of relevant features) and external validation (30 independent external reviewers), 30 selected UIA cases were used to analyze agreement with UIATS management recommendations based on a 5-point Likert scale (5 indicating strong agreement). Interrater agreement (IRA) was assessed with standardized coefficients of dispersion (vr*) (vr* = 0 indicating excellent agreement and vr* = 1 indicating poor agreement). Results: The UIATS accounts for 29 key factors in UIA management. Agreement with UIATS (mean Likert scores) was 4.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.1-4.3) per reviewer for both reviewer cohorts; agreement per case was 4.3 (95% CI 4.1-4.4) for panel members and 4.5 (95% CI 4.3-4.6) for external reviewers (p = 0.017). Mean Likert scores were 4.2 (95% CI 4.1-4.3) for interventional reviewers (n = 56) and 4.1 (95% CI 3.9-4.4) for noninterventional reviewers (n = 12) (p = 0.290). Overall IRA (vr*) for both cohorts was 0.026 (95% CI 0.019-0.033). Conclusions: This novel UIA decision guidance study captures an excellent consensus among highly informed individuals on UIA management, irrespective of their underlying specialty. Clinicians can use the UIATS as a comprehensive mechanism for indicating how a large group of specialists might manage an individual patient with a UIA.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Neurology
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    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015

Publication Stats

7k Citations
1,336.15 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994-2016
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • • Department of Neurosurgery
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Urologic Surgery
      • • Department of Radiology
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2014
    • University of Iowa
      Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • 2013
    • University of Missouri - St. Louis
      Saint Louis, Michigan, United States
  • 2007
    • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
      Manhattan, New York, United States
  • 2006-2007
    • Barnes Jewish Hospital
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
    • Washington & Lee University
      Лексингтон, Virginia, United States
  • 2004
    • Boston Scientific
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2003
    • University of California, San Francisco
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2002
    • Aarhus University
      Aarhus, Central Jutland, Denmark
  • 2001
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Department of Radiology
      North Carolina, United States
  • 1996-1997
    • University of Wisconsin–Madison
      • Department of Radiology
      Madison, Wisconsin, United States