Amber Reeves-Daniel

Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States

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Publications (38)135.77 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: The need to expand the organ donor pool remains a formidable challenge in kidney transplantation (KT). The use of expanded criteria donors (ECDs) represents one approach, but kidney discard rates are high because of concerns regarding overall quality. Dual KT (DKT) may reduce organ discard and optimize the use of kidneys from marginal donors. Study design: We conducted a single center retrospective review of outcomes in adult recipients of DKTs from adult marginal deceased donors (DD) defined by limited renal functional capacity. If the calculated creatinine clearance in an adult DD was <65 ml/min, then the kidneys were transplanted as a DKT. Results: Over an 11.5 year, 72 DKTS were performed including 45 from ECDs, 17 from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors, and 10 from standard criteria donors (SCD). Mean adult DD and recipient ages were both 60 years, including 29 DDs and 26 recipients ≥65 years of age. Mean pre-DKT waiting and dialysis vintage times were 12 months and 25 months, respectively. Actual patient and graft survival rates were 84.7% and 70.8%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 58 months. One year and death-censored graft survival rates were 90% and 80%, respectively. Outcomes did not differ by DD category, recipient age or presence of delayed graft function (DGF). Eleven patients died at a mean of 32 months post-DKT (8 with functioning grafts) and 13 other patients experienced graft losses at a mean of 33 months. The incidence of DGF was 25%; there were 2 cases (2.8%) of primary nonfunction. Mean length of initial hospital stay was 7.2 days. Mean serum creatinine and GFR levels at 12 and 24 months were 1.5 and 53 and 1.5 mg/dl and 51 ml/min/1.73m(2) , respectively. DKT graft survival and function were superior to concurrent single ECD and similar to concurrent SCD KTs. Two patients underwent successful kidney retransplantation, so the dialysis-free rate in surviving patients was 87%. The proportion of total renal function transplanted from adult DD to DKT recipients was 77% compared to 56% for patients receiving single KTs. Conclusions: DKT using kidneys from adult marginal DDs that otherwise might be discarded offer a viable option to counteract the growing shortage of acceptable single kidneys. Excellent medium-term outcomes can be achieved and waiting times can be reduced in a predominantly older recipient population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Clinical Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk variants in donors and African American (AA) recipient race are associated with worse allograft survival in deceased-donor kidney transplantation (DDKT) from AA donors. To detect other factors impacting allograft survival from deceased AA kidney donors, APOL1 renal-risk variants were genotyped in additional AA kidney donors. Methods: The APOL1 genotypes were linked to outcomes in 478 newly analyzed DDKTs in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Multivariate analyses accounting for recipient age, sex, race, panel-reactive antibody level, HLA match, cold ischemia time, donor age, and expanded criteria donation were performed. These 478 transplantations and 675 DDKTs from a prior report were jointly analyzed. Results: Fully adjusted analyses limited to the new 478 DDKTs replicated shorter renal allograft survival in recipients of APOL1 2-renal-risk-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR], 2.00; P = 0.03). Combined analysis of 1153 DDKTs from AA donors revealed donor APOL1 high-risk genotype (HR, 2.05; P = 3 × 10), older donor age (HR, 1.18; P = 0.05), and younger recipient age (HR, 0.70; P = 0.001) adversely impacted allograft survival. Although prolonged allograft survival was seen in many recipients of APOL1 2-renal-risk-variant kidneys, follow-up serum creatinine concentrations were higher than that in recipients of 0/1 APOL1 renal-risk-variant kidneys. A competing risk analysis revealed that APOL1 impacted renal allograft survival, but not recipient survival. Interactions between donor age and APOL1 genotype on renal allograft survival were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Shorter renal allograft survival is reproducibly observed after DDKT from APOL1 2-renal-risk-variant donors. Younger recipient age and older donor age have independent adverse effects on renal allograft survival.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Variants in donor multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCB1) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) genes are associated with renal allograft failure after transplantation in Europeans. Here we assessed transplantation outcomes of kidneys from 368 African American (AA) and 314 European American (EA) deceased donors based on 38 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning ABCB1 and 16 SNPs spanning CAV1, including previously associated index and haplotype-tagging SNPs. Tests for association with time to allograft failure were performed for the 1233 resultant kidney transplantations, adjusting for recipient age, sex, ethnicity, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody, human leukocyte antigen match, expanded-criteria donation, and APOL1-nephropathy variants in AA donors. Interaction analyses between APOL1 with ABCB1 and CAV1 were performed. In a meta-analysis of all transplantations, ABCB1 index SNP rs1045642 was associated with time to allograft failure and other ABCB1 SNPs were nominally associated, but not CAV1 SNPs. ABCB1 SNP rs1045642 showed consistent effects with the 558 transplantations from EA donors, but not with the 675 transplantations from AA donors. ABCB1 SNP rs956825 and CAV1 SNP rs6466583 interacted with APOL1 in transplants from AA donors. Thus, the T allele at ABCB1 rs1045642 is associated with shorter renal allograft survival for kidneys from American donors. Interactions between ABCB1 and CAV1 with APOL1 may influence allograft failure for transplanted kidneys from AA donors.Kidney International advance online publication, 8 April 2015; doi:10.1038/ki.2015.105.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Kidney International
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p = 0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p = 0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p = 0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · American Journal of Transplantation

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2015

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background In the past, type 2 (C-peptide positive) diabetes mellitus (DM) was a contraindication for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT). Study Design We retrospectively analyzed outcomes in SPKT recipients according to pretransplantation C-peptide levels ≥2.0 ng/mL or < 2.0 ng/mL. Results From November 2001 to March 2013, we performed 162 SPKTs including 30 (18.5%) in patients with C-peptide levels ≥2.0 ng/mL pretransplantation (C-peptide positive group, range 2.1 to 12.4 ng/mL) and 132 in patients with absent or low C-peptide levels (<2.0 ng/mL, C-peptide "negative"). C-peptide positive patients were older at SPKT, had a later age of onset and shorter duration of pretransplantation DM, and more were African-American (all p < 0.05) compared with C-peptide negative patients. With a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, patient (80% vs 82.6%), kidney graft (63.3% vs 68.9%), and pancreas graft survivals (50% vs 62.1%, all p = NS) rates were comparable in C-peptide positive and negative patients, respectively. At latest follow-up, there were no differences in acute rejection episodes, surgical complications, major infections, readmissions, hemoglobin A1c levels, serum creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate levels between the 2 groups. C-peptide levels were higher (mean 5.0 vs 2.6 ng/mL, p < 0.05) and post-transplant weight gain (≥5 kg) was more common (57% vs 33%, p = 0.004) in the C-peptide positive group. Survival outcomes in C-peptide positive (n = 14) vs C-peptide negative (n = 22) African-American patients were similar, as were outcomes in C-peptide positive patients with a body mass index < or ≥ 28 kg/m2. Conclusions Patients with higher pretransplantion C-peptide levels appear to have a type 2 DM phenotype compared to insulinopenic patients undergoing SPKT. However, survival and functional outcomes were similar, suggesting that pretransplantation C-peptide levels should not be used exclusively to determine candidacy for SPKT.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of the American College of Surgeons
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the Wake Forest experience with pancreas transplantation in the new millennium with attention to surgical techniques and immunosuppression. A monocentric, retrospective review of outcomes in simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplant (SKPT) and solitary pancreas transplant (SPT) recipients was performed. All patients underwent pancreas transplantation as intent-to-treat with portal venous and enteric exocrine drainage and received depleting antibody induction; maintenance therapy included tapered steroids or early steroid elimination with mycophenolate and tacrolimus. Recipient selection was based on clinical judgment whether or not the patient exhibited measureable levels of C-peptide. Over an 11.25 year period, 202 pancreas transplants were performed in 192 patients including 162 SKPTs and 40 SPTs. A total of 186 (92%) were primary and 16 (8%) pancreas retransplants; portal-enteric drainage was performed in 179 cases. A total of 39 pancreas transplants were performed in African American (AA) patients; of the 162 SKPTs, 30 were performed in patients with pretransplant C-peptide levels > 2.0 ng/mL. In addition, from 2005-2008, 46 SKPT patients were enrolled in a prospective study of single dose alemtuzumab vs 3-5 doses of rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin induction therapy. With a mean follow-up of 5.7 in SKPT vs 7.7 years in SPT recipients, overall patient (86% SKPT vs 87% SPT) and kidney (74% SKPT vs 80% SPT) graft survival rates as well as insulin-free rates (both 65%) were similar (P = NS). Although mortality rates were nearly identical in SKPT compared to SPT recipients, patterns and timing of death were different as no early mortality occurred in SPT recipients whereas the rates of mortality following SKPT were 4%, 9% and 12%, at 1-, 3- and 5-years follow-up, respectively (P < 0.05). The primary cause of graft loss in SKPT recipients was death with a functioning graft whereas the major cause of graft loss following SPT was acute and chronic rejection. The overall incidence of acute rejection was 29% in SKPT and 27.5% in SPT recipients (P = NS). Lower rates of acute rejection and major infection were evidenced in SKPT patients receiving alemtuzumab induction therapy. Comparable kidney and pancreas graft survival rates were observed in AA and non-AA recipients despite a higher prevalence of a "type 2 diabetes" phenotype in AA. Results comparable to those achieved in insulinopenic diabetics were found in the transplantation of type 2 diabetics with detectable C-peptide levels. In the new millennium, acceptable medium-term outcomes can be achieved in SKPT and SPTs as nearly 2/3rds of patients are insulin independent following pancreas transplantation.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Sep 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Relationships between race/ethnicity, recipient medical insurance, and living donor kidney transplantation (LKT) are incompletely described. Methods: Associations between medical insurance and LKT were assessed in 447 recipients at a southeastern US transplant center. Primary and secondary payers were included in the analyses. Results: A total of 387 deceased donor transplantations and 60 LKTs were performed in 246 (55%) European American (EA), 175 (39.2%) African American (AA), 15 (3.4%) Asian, and 11 (2.5%) Hispanic recipients. Among recipients, 182 (40.8%) were privately insured, 125 (28%) had Medicaid, and the remainder had Medicare, Medicare supplements, or Medicare replacement policies. A higher proportion of patients with private insurance, relative to those without private insurance, received LKT (22% vs. 7.6%, p < 0.0001). Among ethnic groups, LKT with, vs. without, private insurance was 27.5% vs. 12.4% in EAs (p = 0.0028) and 14.3% vs. 0.9% in AAs (p = 0.0005). Medicaid recipients (n = 125) were less likely to receive LKT than those without Medicaid (4.8% vs. 16.8%, p = 0.0003). Among the 69 AA recipients with Medicaid, none received LKT (0 Medicaid vs. 9.5% without Medicaid, p = 0.0065). Conclusions: Recipient insurance status is associated with LKT, positively with private insurance and negatively with Medicaid. AAs were impacted to a greater extent, potentially contributing to lower rates of LKT.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Clinical Transplantation
  • Amudha Palanisamy · Amber M Reeves-Daniel · Barry I Freedman
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    ABSTRACT: Dramatic improvements have been seen in short-term kidney allograft survival over recent decades with introduction of more potent immunosuppressant medications and regimens. Unfortunately, improvements in long-term graft survival have lagged behind. The genomics revolution is providing new insights regarding the potential impact of kidney donor genotypes on long-term graft survival. Variation in the donor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), caveolin 1 (CAV1), and multi-drug resistance 1 encoding P-glycoprotein genes (ABCB1) are all associated with graft survival after kidney transplantation. Although the precise mechanisms whereby these donor gene variants confer risk for graft loss have yet to be determined, these findings provide novel opportunities for modifying interactive environmental factors and optimizing kidney allocation with the ultimate goal of improving long-term graft survival rates.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Pediatric Nephrology
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    ABSTRACT: Familial aggregation of non-diabetic end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is found in African Americans and variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) contribute to this risk. To detect genetic associations with milder forms of nephropathy in the high-risk families, analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations to assess relationships between kidney disease phenotypes and APOL1 variants in 786 relatives of 470 families. Adjusting for familial correlations, 23.1, 46.7, and 30.2% of genotyped relatives possessed two, one, or no APOL1 risk variants, respectively. Relatives with two compared with one or no risk variants had statistically indistinguishable median systolic blood pressure, urine albumin to creatinine ratio, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR; MDRD equation), and serum cystatin C levels. After adjusting for age, gender, age at ESRD in families, and African ancestry, significant associations were detected between APOL1 with overt proteinuria and estimated GFR (CKD-EPI equation), with a trend toward significance for quantitative albuminuria. Thus, relatives of African Americans with non-diabetic ESRD are enriched for APOL1 risk variants. After adjustment, two APOL1 risk variants weakly predict mild forms of kidney disease. Second hits appear necessary for the initiation of APOL1-associated nephropathy.Kidney International advance online publication, 13 June 2012; doi:10.1038/ki.2012.217.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Kidney International
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    A M Reeves-Daniel · B I Freedman

    Preview · Article · Feb 2012 · American Journal of Transplantation
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    A M Reeves-Daniel · J Divers · C D Langefeld · B I Freedman

    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · American Journal of Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Coding variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) are strongly associated with nephropathy in African Americans (AAs). The effect of transplanting kidneys from AA donors with two APOL1 nephropathy risk variants is unknown. APOL1 risk variants were genotyped in 106 AA deceased organ donors and graft survival assessed in 136 resultant kidney transplants. Cox-proportional hazard models tested for association between time to graft failure and donor APOL1 genotypes. The mean follow-up was 26.4 ± 21.8 months. Twenty-two of 136 transplanted kidneys (16%) were from donors with two APOL1 nephropathy risk variants. Twenty-five grafts failed; eight (32%) had two APOL1 risk variants. A multivariate model accounting for donor APOL1 genotype, overall African ancestry, expanded criteria donation, recipient age and gender, HLA mismatch, CIT and PRA revealed that graft survival was significantly shorter in donor kidneys with two APOL1 risk variants (hazard ratio [HR] 3.84; p = 0.008) and higher HLA mismatch (HR 1.52; p = 0.03), but not for overall African ancestry excluding APOL1. Kidneys from AA deceased donors harboring two APOL1 risk variants failed more rapidly after renal transplantation than those with zero or one risk variants. If replicated, APOL1 genotyping could improve the donor selection process and maximize long-term renal allograft survival.
    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · American Journal of Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertension may be a either a cause or an effect of kidney disease. Although hypertension is an important component of the expanded criteria donor definition, risks of transplanting deceased donor kidneys from hypertensive standard criteria donors (SCD) are less well understood. Retrospective single-center study in all adult patients who received a deceased donor kidney transplant from a SCD to evaluate the role of donor hypertension as a pre-transplant risk factor for death-censored graft loss (DCGL) and renal function. From October 2001 through May 2008, 297 kidney transplants were performed from donation after brain death SCDs. A total of 47 (15.8%) grafts were lost, including 19 (6.4%) deaths with functioning grafts. Univariate analysis of death-censored cases (n = 278) identified history of donor hypertension, cold ischemia time (CIT) >30 h, and African American (AA) recipients as significant pre-transplant risk factors predictive for DCGL at five yr follow-up (mean 38 months, all p < 0.02). Cox regression analysis showed donor hypertension (relative risk 2.2, p = 0.04) to be a significant risk factor for DCGL, whereas CIT >30 h and AA recipient ethnicity showed only trends toward DCGL. Renal function as determined by serum creatinine levels was significantly higher in recipients of hypertensive compared with non-hypertensive SCD kidneys at all time points out to 48 months follow-up and the disparity in renal function increased over time. Transplanting SCD kidneys from hypertensive donors is associated with worse graft function and an increased risk of graft loss.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2011 · Clinical Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to characterize differences in donor and recipient relationships between African American (AA) and Caucasian living kidney donors. Data from all successful living kidney donors at a single institution between 1991 and 2009 were reviewed. Relationships between donor and recipient were categorized and between-group comparisons performed. The study sample consisted of 73 (18%) AA and 324 Caucasian living kidney donors. The distribution of donor-recipient relationships differed significantly between AA and Caucasians. AA donors were more likely to be related to the recipient (88% vs. 74%, p = 0.007) than Caucasians. AA donors were more likely to participate in child to parent donation and were less likely to participate in parent to child donation or to donate to unrelated individuals. Sibling and spousal donations were similar in both groups. Caucasian donors were more likely to be unrelated to the recipient than AA donors. Differences exist in donor-recipient relationships between AA and Caucasian living kidney donors. Future studies exploring cultural differences and family dynamics may provide targeted recruitment strategies for AA and Caucasian living kidney donors. Living unrelated kidney transplantation appears to be a potential growth area for living kidney donation in AA.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2011 · Clinical Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the outcome of pancreas transplantations in diabetic recipients according to risk factors, surgical techniques, and immunosuppression management that evolved over the course of a decade at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. A randomized trial of alemtuzumab versus rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (rATG) induction in simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation (SKPT) at our institution demonstrated lower rates of acute rejection and infection in the alemtuzumab group. Consequently, alemtuzumab induction has been used exclusively in all pancreas transplantations since February 2009. Early steroid elimination has been feasible in the majority of patients. Extensive experience with surveillance pancreas biopsies in solitary pancreas transplantation (SPT) is described. Surveillance pancreas biopsy-directed immunosuppression has contributed to equivalent long-term pancreas graft survival rates in SKPT and SPT recipients at our center, in contrast to recent registry reports of persistently higher rates of immunologic pancreas graft loss in SPT. Furthermore, the impact of donor and recipient selection on outcomes is explored. Excellent results have been achieved with older (extended) donors and recipients, in recipients of organs from donation after cardiac death donors managed with extracorporeal support, and in African-American patients. Type 2 diabetics with detectable C-peptide levels have been transplanted successfully with outcomes comparable to those of insulinopenic diabetics. Our experiences are discussed in the light of findings reported in the literature.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · The Review of Diabetic Studies
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    Dwayne A Pierce · Amber M Reeves-Daniel
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    ABSTRACT: To report the case of a kidney allograft recipient on a stable regimen of tacrolimus who exhibited increased tacrolimus concentrations within 24 hours of initiating ranolazine. A 64-year-old kidney allograft recipient on a stable dose of tacrolimus (10 mg twice daily) was admitted for recent worsening of her chronic anginal pain. The patient was initiated on ranolazine 500 mg twice daily on hospital day 2. Tacrolimus concentrations rose from 7.0-10.1 ng/mL preadmission to 17.8 ng/mL within 24 hours of ranolazine initiation. Ranolazine therapy was continued due to the patient's beneficial response; therefore, the tacrolimus dose was eventually decreased by 70% to 3 mg twice daily to maintain steady-state trough concentrations between 6.6 and 7.9 ng/mL with ranolazine therapy. Ranolazine dechallenge on a subsequent admission produced subtherapeutic tacrolimus concentrations requiring dosage increases. Ranolazine, an antianginal agent, is both a substrate and a weak inhibitor of CYP3A as well as a substrate and moderate inhibitor of the P-glycoprotein (P-GP) efflux transport system. Tacrolimus, an immunosuppressant, is also a substrate of CYP3A and P-GP. Through possible inhibition of both P-GP- and CYP3A-mediated first-pass metabolism and CYP3A systemic metabolism, ranolazine may have significantly increased serum concentrations of tacrolimus necessitating an eventual 70% decrease in the tacrolimus dose. Based on the Horn Drug Interaction Probability Scale, this interaction is possible. We suggest that the eventual 70% decrease in tacrolimus dose after ranolazine initiation may indicate that ranolazine decreases the metabolism and clearance of tacrolimus, causing an elevation in tacrolimus concentrations and the potential for tacrolimus toxicity. Clinicians should be aware of this possible interaction when initiating ranolazine in patients on tacrolimus.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Annals of Pharmacotherapy