Albert H M van Straten

Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, North Brabant, Netherlands

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Publications (64)176.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the mid-term haemodynamic and clinical results after aortic valve replacement (AVR) using the Sorin Freedom Solo (SFS) stentless bioprosthesis, compared with the standard Carpentier Edwards Perimount (CEP) stented bioprosthesis. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data, 116 patients were included in the SFS group (53 males; median age 74 years, range 56-85 years), and 122 patients in the CEP group (85 males; median age 73 years, range 43-88 years) between July 2007 and January 2013. Echocardiography was performed at 6 weeks after surgery in our centre, and the most recent echocardiography (in our centre or in referring cardiology departments) was requested. Between September 2013 and April 2014, all patients were called by the same researcher to gain clinical follow-up data. Results: Mid-term mortality was 16.4% in the SFS group (19 patients) and 21.3% in the CEP group (26 patients); (P = 0.3). The mean transvalvular gradient was 7.4 ± 3.1 mmHg in the SFS group, and 11.6 ± 3.2 mmHg in the CEP group at 6 weeks postoperatively (P < 0.001). When stratified by labelled valve size, mean gradients were significantly lower in the SFS group for every size (P ≤ 0.03). After 3.3 ± 1.4 years of follow-up, the mean gradient was still significantly lower in the SFS group than that in the CEP group (P < 0.001). Clinical follow-up showed relatively low complication rates. Conclusion: These data suggest that the Sorin Freedom Solo stentless bioprosthesis is as safe as the Carpentier Edwards bioprosthesis, and provides better short- and mid-term haemodynamic performance than the Carpentier Edwards bioprosthesis.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
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    M.C. Haanschoten · A.H.M. van Straten · M. A. Soliman Hamad

    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Netherlands heart journal: monthly journal of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Heart Foundation
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES Literature reporting on large patient groups with the long-term follow-up is limited due to the low incidence of myxomas. This single-centre, retrospective study reports on the long-term follow-up (e.g. complications, recurrence and survival) of a substantial patient group operated for cardiac myxomas. METHODS Patients were retrospectively selected from a prospectively obtained database comprising patients who had undergone cardiac surgery in the Catharina Hospital from 1990 onwards. Baseline characteristics and perioperative data were obtained from the database. In case of insufficient information, medical reports were analysed. The echocardiogram and clinical follow-up data were collected at outpatient clinics. RESULTS Eighty-two patients were included, of which 48 were females with a mean age of 61.3 years (±13.8). The main presenting symptom was dyspnoea (29.3%), followed by chest pain (24.4%), palpitations (19.5%) and embolism (15.9%). Atrial fibrillation was the most frequent complication; directly postoperative (22%) and at the long-term follow-up (26.3%). The follow-up was completed in 95.1%, with a mean echocardiographic follow-up time of 72 months and with a longest follow-up of almost 23 years. There were no myxoma recurrences. Thirteen patients (16.5%) deceased during the follow-up, with a mean time of 9 years after surgery. CONCLUSIONS Myxomas carry the risk of severe complications. Surgical excision is the only option of treatment and gives excellent early and long-term results. Recurrence rates are low in case of non-hereditary myxomas, even in case of irradical excision. The echocardiographic follow-up therefore could be called into question. Link to full text: http://icvts.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/05/12/icvts.ivv125.full?keytype=ref&ijkey=q5TwhsDgBtpOHQY
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been introduced, but one of its complications is left bundle branch block (LBBB), a conduction disturbance that has been associated with increased mortality. We investigated the incidence and fate of both right bundle branch block (RBBB) and LBBB after aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a retrospective analysis. We also studied the predictive value of both disorders for all-cause mortality.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background In our institution, we have redefined our criteria for direct availability of red blood cell (RBC) units in the operation room. In this study, we sought to evaluate the safety of applying this new logistical policy of blood transfusion in the first preliminary group of patients. Methods In March 2010, we started a new policy concerning the elective availability of RBC units in the operation room. This policy was called: No Elective Red Cells (NERC) program. The program was applied for patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or single valve surgery. No elective RBC units were preoperatively ordered for these patients. In case of urgent need, blood was delivered to the operating room within 20 min. The present study includes the first 500 patients who were managed according to this policy. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of biomedical variables on fulfilling this NERC program. Results The majority of patients (n = 409, 81 %) did not receive any RBCs during the hospital stay. In patients who did receive RBCs (n = 91, 19 %), 11 patients (2.2 %) received RBCs after 24 h postoperatively. Female gender, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and EuroSCORE were significant predictors for the need of blood transfusion (OR = 3.12; 2.79; 1.17 respectively). Conclusion In a selected group of patients, it is safe to perform cardiac surgery without the immediate availability of RBCs in the operating room. Transfusion was avoided in 81 % of these patients. Female gender, LVEF and EuroSCORE were associated with blood transfusion.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Netherlands heart journal: monthly journal of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Heart Foundation
  • Astrid G M van Boxtel · Albert H M van Straten · Mohamed A Soliman Hamad

    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aim of the study: Minimally invasive techniques for aortic valve replacement (AVR) have been developed as an alternative to conventional AVR for patients with high operative risk. Yet, these techniques are still associated with an increased risk of postoperative conduction disorders. The study aim was to identify the incidence and fate of postoperative conduction disorders in patients undergoing sutureless (SU) AVR with the Perceval S bioprosthesis. Methods: In this observational study, patients who underwent SU AVR with the Perceval S prosthesis at the Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, were analyzed. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) recorded at baseline, within 24 h postoperatively, before hospital discharge and at follow up were collected by reviewing patients' records. The ECGs were analyzed by two independent investigators to record QRS-duration and conduction disorders. Results: All patients (n = 31) who underwent implantation of the Perceval S bioprosthesis between September 2010 and September 2012 were included. At baseline, three patients (9.7%) had preexisting left bundle branch block (LBBB), and one patient (3.2%) had a permanent pacemaker (PPM). New-onset LBBB developed in 11 patients (39.3%), and was transient in three patients (10.7%). Postoperatively, four patients (13.3%) required PPM implantation because of total atrioventricular block; all of these patients had either pre-existing LBBB (n = 1) or new LBBB (n = 3). Conclusion: Sutureless AVR with the Perceval S bioprosthesis was frequently complicated by new LBBB, which was persistent in the majority of patients. A relatively high incidence of postoperative PPM implantation was also observed.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · The Journal of heart valve disease
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aim of the studyIn the present study, we investigated the survival of patients who received postoperative renal replacement therapy (RRT) after cardiac surgery. We specifically focused on factors predicting long-term outcome in elderly patients.Methods Data of all patients that received unintentional renal replacement therapy following cardiac surgery between 2004 and 2010 were analyzed. Logistic- and Cox regression analyses were performed to detect the predictors of early and late mortality, respectively.ResultsDuring the study period, 11,899 patients underwent cardiac surgery in our center. Post-operative RRT was performed in 138 patients (1.2%). In this group of patients, 30-day mortality included 72 patients (52%) and the total overall mortality included 107 patients (77.5%). Regression analyses revealed that age predicted 30-day mortality (odds ratio = 1.08 [1.03 to 1.12]) as well as late mortality (odds ratio = 1.05 [1.02 to 1.07].Conclusions Patients requiring RRT after cardiac surgery have a poor prognosis with a high mortality. Older age predicted both 30-day and late mortality in these patients.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of Cardiac Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical correction of pectus excavatum (PE) has shifted to the modern minimally invasive Nuss procedure, which proved to be safe and effective. In order to restore the dented deformity, custom-curved metal bars provide continuous retrosternal pressure but cross the habitat of the internal mammary arteries (IMAs) directly affecting their patency. In this initial report, we sought to assess the patency of the IMAs in the first 6 patients who underwent Nuss bar removal in our department. In 2010, we started to perform correction of PE using the Nuss bar technique. In 2013, observational analysis was performed on the first 6 patients who underwent removal of the Nuss bar. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed in order to assess the patency of both IMAs directly after removal. In 4 (67%) patients, IMA patency was affected unilaterally (total obstruction or highly decreased flow pattern) corresponding with the lowest retrosternal side. According to our preliminary results, the oppressive force of Nuss bars interferes with IMA patency and thereby compromises future usability in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We recommend that patients undergoing CABG following the Nuss procedure undergo preoperative evaluation of IMA patency. This study will be continued to include a larger number of patients including follow-up CTA one year after removal of the bar.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we sought to determine the effect of the mean transprosthetic pressure gradient (TPG), measured at 6 weeks after aortic valve replacement (AVR) or AVR with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on late all-cause mortality. Between January 1998 and March 2012, 2,276 patients (mean age 68 ± 11 years) underwent TPG analysis at 6 weeks after AVR (n = 1,318) or AVR with CABG (n = 958) at a single institution. Mean TPG was 11.6 ± 7.8 mmHg and median TPG 11 mmHg. Based on the TPG, the patients were split into three groups: patients with a low TPG (<10 mmHg), patients with a medium TPG (10-19 mmHg) and patients with a high TPG (≥20 mmHg). Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to determine univariate predictors and multivariate independent predictors of late mortality. Overall survival for the entire group at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 97, 93, 87 and 67 %, respectively. There was no significant difference in long-term survival between patients with a low, medium or high TPG (p = 0.258). Independent predictors of late mortality included age, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a history of a cerebrovascular accident and cardiopulmonary bypass time. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM), severe PPM and TPG measured at 6 weeks postoperatively were not significantly associated with late mortality. TPG measured at 6 weeks after AVR or AVR with CABG is not an independent predictor of all-cause late mortality and there is no significant difference in long-term survival between patients with a low, medium or high TPG.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · Clinical Research in Cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: Data relating to the impact of body mass index (BMI) on outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) are scarce and controversial. The study aim was to investigate the predictive value of BMI for early and late mortality after isolated AVR. Data obtained from patients who underwent isolated AVR between January 1998 and December 2010 at the authors' institution were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were allocated to five groups according to the preoperative BMI: underweight (BMI < 20 kg/m2); normal weight (BMI 20.0-24.9 kg/m2); overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m2); obese (BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2); and morbidly obese (BMI > 34.9 kg/m2). Logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to identify the independent predictors of early and late mortality, respectively. After excluding 20 patients who were lost to follow up, and 30 patients with missing preoperative BMI data, a total of 1,758 patients was included in the analysis. The mean follow up was 5.6 +/- 3.5 years (range: 0-13.4 years), and the mean BMI 26.8 +/- 4.3 kg/m2 (range: 17-52 kg/m2). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed no association between early mortality and the BMI groups. Multivariate Cox regression analyses showed 'underweight' to be an independent predictor for late mortality (hazard ratio 2.89; 95% confidence interval 1.63-5.13, p < 0.0001). 'Underweight' is an independent predictor for late mortality after AVR surgery. Morbid obesity did not prove to be predictive of a worse late survival.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · The Journal of heart valve disease

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · The Annals of Thoracic Surgery
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    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The predictive value of preoperative hemoglobin (HB) level on the outcome of patients undergoing valve surgery is not well established. This study evaluated the predictive value of preoperative HB level on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR). DESIGN: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. SETTING: A single-center study performed in an educational hospital. PARTICIPANTS: All consecutive patients (n = 1,808) who underwent AVR between January 1998 and December 2010. INTERVENTIONS: AVR. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients were classified into 4 groups according to the preoperative HB level: very low (HB of <12g/dL in men and <11g/dL in women), low (HB of 12-13g/dL in men and 11-12g/dL in women), normal (HB of 13-14.5g/dL in men and 12-13.5g/dL in women), and high normal (HB of ≥14.5g/dL in men and ≥13.5g/dL in women). The mean follow-up duration was 5.58±3.5 years, and the median follow-up duration was 5.38 years. The mean preoperative HB was 14±1.6g/dL for men and 13.0±2.1g/dL for women. Early mortality (≤30 days) was 6.1% in the very-low-HB group, 5.4% in the low-HB group, 3.2% in the normal HB group, and 2.3% in the high-normal-HB group (p = 0.37). Late mortality (>30 days) was 26.1% in the very-low-HB group, 23.7% in the low-HB group, 17.1% in the normal-HB group, and 12.6% in the high-normal-HB group (p<0.0001). The multivariate logistic regression model did not identify low HB as an independent predictor for early mortality. Cox regression multivariate analysis revealed both HB level, as a continuous variable, (p = 0.006), and very-low-HB level (p<0.0001), as independent predictors of late mortality. Cox regression analyses, corrected for confounders, demonstrated that low-HB level is an independent predictor for higher overall mortality (hazard ratio = 2.00, CI 1.41-2.85, p≤0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing AVR, preoperative low-HB level is an independent risk factor for late mortality, but not for early mortality.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia
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    ABSTRACT: Background The influence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains controversial. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of PPM on early (≤30 days) and late mortality (>30 days) after AVR or AVR combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (AVR with CABG). Methods Between January 1998 and March 2012, 2976 patients underwent AVR (n= 1718) or AVR with CABG (n=1258) at a single institution. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) ≤0.85 cm2/m2 and patients were divided into two groups based on the existence of PPM. Cumulative probability values of survival were estimated with Kaplan-Meier method and compared between groups using Breslow test. Univariate and multivariate independent predictors of early mortality were identified using logistic regression. Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to determine univariate and multivariate independent predictors of late mortality. Results Early mortality was 6.7% in the PPM group vs 4.7% in the group with no PPM (p=0.013). Late mortality for the PPM group at 1, 5 and 10 years was 4%, 16% and 43%, respectively. Late mortality for the group with no PPM at 1, 5 and 10 years was 4%, 15% and 33% respectively. Independent predictors of early mortality included age, severely impaired left ventricular (LV) function, endocarditis, renal dysfunction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time. Multivariate independent predictors of late mortality included age, severely impaired LV function, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), renal dysfunction, history of a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), CPB time and a history of previous cardiac surgery. PPM was not an independent predictor of early or late mortality. Conclusion PPM is not an independent predictor of both early and late mortality after AVR or AVR combined with CABG.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Comparison of outcomes requires adequate risk adjustment for differences in patient risk and the type of intervention performed. Both unintentional and intentional misclassification (also called gaming) of risk factors might lead to incorrect benchmark results. Therefore, misclassification of risk factors should be detected. We investigated the use of statistical process control techniques to monitor the frequency of risk factors in a clinical database. Methods and results: A national population-based study was performed using simulation and statistical process control. All patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, in all 16 cardiothoracic surgery centers in the Netherlands were included. Data on 46 883 consecutive cardiac surgery interventions were extracted. The expected risk factor frequencies were based on 2007 and 2008 data. Monthly frequency rates of 18 risk factors in 2009 were monitored using a Shewhart control chart, exponentially weighted moving average chart, and cumulative sum chart. Upcoding (ie, gaming) in random patients was simulated and detected in 100% of the simulations. Subtle forms of gaming, involving specifically high-risk patients, were more difficult to identify (detection rate of 44%). However, the accompanying rise in mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) was detected in all simulations. Conclusions: Statistical process control in the form of a Shewhart control chart, exponentially weighted moving average, and cumulative sum charts provide a means to monitor changes in risk factor frequencies in a clinical database. Surveillance of the overall expected risk in addition to the separate risk factors ensures a high sensitivity to detect gaming. The use of statistical process control for risk factor surveillance is recommended.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Circulation Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: The PAS-Port® Proximal Anastomosis System (Cardica, Inc, Redwood City, CA, USA) has been used worldwide since March 2003. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of the PAS-Port® Proximal Anastomosis System. Methods: All the patients who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in the Catharina Hospital Eindhoven between August 2006 and April 2010 were included in a non-randomized retrospective case-control study, if they had at least one proximal vein graft anastomosis. Study end-points consisted of overall survival, coronary reintervention and postoperative stroke. Results: The study included 312 patients (201 cases, 111 controls). After 36 months of follow-up there was no difference in survival between cases and controls (92.2% vs. 93.7%, P=0.52). No significant difference could be detected between cases and controls with respect to overall coronary reintervention-free survival (93% vs. 96.4%, P=0.20) and freedom from coronary reintervention due to proximal vein graft failure (98% vs. 100% P=0.14). The use of the PAS-Port system could not be identified as an independent risk factor of coronary reintervention (p=0.21). Postoperative stroke rates of cases and controls (2% vs. 0.9%, P=0.42) were comparable. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes in patients treated with the PAS-Port® Proximal Anastomosis System were satisfactory compared with those treated with the conventional hand-sewing technique. The use of the PAS-Port system was not associated with higher adverse outcome in terms of overall survival, stroke, coronary reintervention-free survival and freedom from reintervention due to proximal vein graft failure.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · The Journal of cardiovascular surgery
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES Various studies have shown different parameters as independent risk factors in predicting the success of fast-track postoperative management in cardiac surgery. In the present study, we evaluated our 7-year experience with the fast-track protocol and investigated the preoperative predictors of successful outcome.METHODS Between 2004 and 2010, 5367 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were preoperatively selected for postoperative admission in the postanaesthesia care unit (PACU) and were included in this study. These patients were then transferred to the ordinary ward on the same day of the operation. The primary end-point of the study was the success of the PACU protocol, defined as discharge to the ward on the same day, no further admission to the intensive care unit and no operative mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to detect the independent risk factors for failure of the PACU pathway.RESULTSOf 11 895 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, 5367 (45.2%) were postoperatively admitted to the PACU. The protocol was successful in 4510 patients (84.0%). Using the multivariate logistic regression analysis, older age and left ventricular dysfunction were found to be independent risk factors for failure of the PACU protocol [odds ratio of 0.98/year (0.97-0.98) and 0.31 (0.14-0.70), respectively].CONCLUSIONS Our fast-track management, called the PACU protocol, is efficient and safe for the postoperative management of selected patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Age and left ventricular dysfunction are significant preoperative predictors of failure of this protocol.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the short and long-term operative results of patients who underwent a Bentall procedure in a 12-year period. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 170 patients who underwent an elective Bentall procedure between January 1998 and July 2010. All pre- and perioperative variable were entered into a multivariate regression model to identify significant predictors of early and late mortality. The early mortality rate was 11.2% (19/170 patients). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified prior cardiac operation and cardiopulmonary bypass time as independent risk factors for early mortality, with odds ratios of 5.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.850-17.874; p=0.003) and 1.011 (95% confidence interval: 1.003-1.019; p=0.008), respectively. The Kaplan-Meier curve shows an overall survival of 78%±4% at 5 years and 66%±10% at 10 years. Cox regression analysis revealed no independent risk factors for late mortality. The Bentall procedure is still the procedure of choice for aortic root replacement. Improvements in perioperative management in recent years has improved the early outcome, and in our experience, the late results of this technique were satisfactory.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2012 · Asian cardiovascular & thoracic annals