Byron L Zamboanga

Smith College, Нортхемптон, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (138)245.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The links between discrimination and adjustment in U.S. Latino/a immigrant adolescents is an important but understudied phenomenon. We aimed to investigate the longitudinal associations (across 1 year) among discrimination, prosocial behaviors, and depressive symptoms in U.S. Latino immigrant adolescents using two competing models: associations between discrimination and prosocial behaviors via depressive symptoms (mental health strain model), and associations between discrimination and depressive symptoms via prosocial behaviors (prosociality strain model). Participants were 302 Latino/a recent immigrant adolescents (53.3 % boys, M age = 14.51 years at Time 1, SD = .88 years) who completed measures of discrimination, depressive symptoms, and prosocial behaviors at 6-month intervals. The results provided support for both proposed models. The discussion examines the importance of prosocial behaviors in understanding adjustment and effects of discrimination among recently immigrated U.S. Latino adolescents.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Youth and Adolescence
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    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2015
  • Seth J. Schwartz · Miguel Ángel Cano · Byron L. Zamboanga

    No preview · Chapter · Oct 2015
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    Seth J. Schwartz · Byron L. Zamboanga · Keon Luyckx · Alan Meca · Rachel A. Ritchie

    Full-text · Chapter · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Research with college students indicates that conformity to distinct masculine norms is associated with heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. Drinking games (DGs) involve heavy alcohol consumption, and although such games have been characterized as a male-dominated activity, studies have not examined how gender-relevant factors such as conformity to masculine norms are associated with DGs participation. Moreover, the extent to which these associations vary as a function of race/ethnicity warrants further exploration because the exact role that these factors play in increasing college students’ risk for DGs participation is unclear. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to examine the associations between distinct masculine norms and frequency of DGs participation (while controlling for typical alcohol consumption) in a sample of White (n = 328) and Asian American (n = 136) college men (Mage = 18.11 years, SD = 0.35). A secondary aim was to test the degree to which such relationships are similar between these groups. Male college freshmen from a public university completed self-report questionnaires. Results indicated that increased levels of conformity to the masculine norms of being a playboy and heterosexual presentation were significantly associated with more frequent DGs participation for White but not Asian American college men. Implications for intervention and future research directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Psychology of Men & Masculinity
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    ABSTRACT: Drawing from a theory of bicultural family functioning 2 models were tested to examine the longitudinal effects of acculturation-related variables on adolescent health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms (HRB/DS) mediated by caregiver and adolescent reports of family functioning. One model examined the effects of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A second model examined the individual effects of caregiver and adolescent acculturation components in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A sample of 302 recently immigrated Hispanic caregiver-child dyads completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. cultural practices, values, and identities at baseline (predictors); measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement 6 months postbaseline (mediators); and only adolescents completed measures of smoking, binge drinking, inconsistent condom use, and depressive symptoms 1 year postbaseline (outcomes). Measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement were used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to estimate the fit of a latent construct for family functioning. Key findings indicate that (a) adolescent acculturation components drove the effect of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning; (b) higher levels of adolescent family functioning were associated with less HRB/DS, whereas higher levels of caregiver family functioning were associated with more adolescent HRB/DS; (c) and only adolescent reports of family functioning mediated the effects of acculturation components and caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies on HRB/DS. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Family Psychology
  • Ivan Jacob Agaloos Pesigan · Byron L Zamboanga · Cara C. Tomaso
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    ABSTRACT: Pregaming (i.e., drinking before going to a social event or gathering; Borsari et al., 2003) is not only highly prevalent on college campuses but is also associated with increased alcohol consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences (Foster & Fegusson, 2014). Indeed, results from a large, multisite college student sample indicate that approximately 52% of Hispanics reported current participation in pregaming (Paves et al., 2012). The bulk of the college alcohol literature investigating the correlates of problematic drinking behaviors have been conducted with White samples, which poses a challenge in light of the increasing ethnic diversity on college campuses. Given the rapid increase in the Hispanic college student population, the identification of factors associated with a high-risk drinking behavior like pregaming among Hispanic students is an important research inquiry. Research with Hispanic college students has found that acculturation is associated with drinking behaviors (for a recent review, see Zamboanga et al., 2013). Acculturation is the process of psychological, social, and cultural change and adaptation that occurs when cultural groups come in contact with each other (Schwartz et al., 2010). Schwartz et al. (2010) also outlined different domains of acculturation, including cultural practices (e.g., language use, traditions), values (e.g., individualism/collectivism), and identification (i.e., ethnic/U.S. identities). Moreover, the field has moved away from unidimensional models of acculturation (i.e., assumes that individuals abandon their heritage values, identity, and practices and automatically adopt those of their host society) to bidimensional models (i.e., assumes individuals can maintain their heritage culture while simultaneously identifying with their host culture's values, identifications, and practices). Thus, the present study employs a bidimensional/multidomain approach to investigate how acculturation is associated with pregaming among Hispanic college students. Since the literature on acculturation and alcohol use among Hispanic college students does not appear to paint a clear picture of the relationship between these two variables, either due to an overreliance on unidimensional models and/or a failure to examine multiple cultural domains of acculturation, this study is an important step towards strengthening our understanding of this association. Hispanic college students (n=1365; mean age=19.7) from 30 U.S. colleges/universitiescompleted self-report measures of acculturation practices, values, cultural identifications, and frequency of prepartying. Results from our structural equation models (controlling for age, gender, birthplace, and Greek membership) indicated that decreased involvement with heritage cultural practices and higher endorsement of individualistic values were associated with more frequent participation in pregaming. The association between acculturation and pregaming did not differ between men and women. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine acculturation and pregaming, a high-risk drinking behavior, among Hispanic college students. As evident in the present study, cultural practices and values (individualism), may be the most relevant predictors of pregaming for Hispanic college students. Since we utilized a bidimensional/multidomain approach to acculturation, we were able to ascertain which cultural domains of acculturation are associated with pregaming. Researchers should adopt a similar approach when conducting future research on acculturation and high-risk drinking behaviors in this population.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The transition from high school to college has been characterized as a vulnerable periodmarked by increased involvement in high-risk behaviors such as alcohol use (Fromme, Corbin, & Kruse, 2008) and heavy drinking (Sher & Rutledge, 2007). Drinking games (DGs) in particular can contribute to problematic alcohol use among college students. Although it has been suggested that DGs are a male-dominated drinking activity (Pedersen & LaBrie, 2008; Borsari, 2004), to our knowledge, there have been no published studies to date examining the role of gender-relevant factors and DGs participation. One gender-relevant factor is masculine norms, which describe the societal beliefs, values, and expectations about what it means to be a 3man ́(Mahalik et al., 2003). Masculine norms have been found to be associated with alcohol use not just among college men, but also among Asian American college men specifically. Whether or not there are similar associations between masculine norms and DGs participation is unknown. As such, the degree to which these relationships vary as a function of race/ethnicity warrants further inquiry. Pedersen and LaBrie (2006) found that White students reported more frequent DGs participation and drank more while gaming than non-White students. Controlling for typical alcohol consumption, the present study examined the associations between distinct masculine norms and frequency of DGs participation, and tested whether such relationships are similar between White and Asian American college freshmen men. Participants consisted of 475 college freshmen men (mean age=18.1; White, n=338; Asian American, n=137) attending a large public university in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. Participants completed a web-based survey and reported how often they played DGs, their daily drinking behaviors, and completed the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-29. Using structural equation modeling, we found that conformity to playboy masculine norms was positively associated with frequency of participation in DGs among the total sample. However, the associations between masculine norms and DGs participation differed between Whites and Asian Americans, such that conformity to the masculine norms of being a playboy and heterosexual presentation were significantly associated with more frequent DGs participation for White but not Asian American men. Heterosexual presentation was positively associated with frequent participation in DGs for White men, even while controlling for typical alcohol consumption. This is contrary to prior research, which found heterosexual presentation to be protective against increased alcohol use (Iwamoto et al., 2014). Perhaps DGs are a specific type of social drinking activity that is attractive to those seeking to showcase 3manly ́ways of consuming alcohol (i.e., heavy consumption and being able to hold one's liquor). College clinical practitioners and health providers could assess conformity to masculine norms, with careful attention given to White, male freshmen. Practitioners could in turn use such information in individual or group settings to facilitate discussion and encourage reflection on how these norms may place certain students at risk for DGs participation (Iwamoto et al., 2014). In closing, the present study contributes to our understanding of distinct masculine norms and their relevance to DGs participation for specific racial/ethnic groups.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: This research examined the magnitude of personality differences across different colleges and universities to understand (1) how much students at different colleges vary from one another and (2) whether there are site level variables that can explain observed differences. Nearly 8,600 students at 30 colleges and universities completed a Big Five personality trait measure. Site level information was obtained from the Integrated Post-Secondary Education System database (U.S. Department of Education). Multi-level models revealed that each of the Big Five traits showed significant between-site variability, even after accounting for individual level demographic differences. Some site-level variables (e.g., enrollment size, requiring letters of recommendation) explained between-site differences in traits, but many tests were not statistically significant. Student samples at different universities differed in terms of average levels of Big Five personality domains. This raises the possibility that personality differences may explain differences in research results obtained when studying students at different colleges and universities. Furthermore, results suggest that research that compares findings for only a few sites (e.g., much cross-cultural research) runs the risk of overgeneralizing differences between specific samples to broader group differences. These results underscore the value of multisite collaborative research efforts to enhance psychological research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Personality
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined, in a sample of recently immigrated Hispanic adolescents in Miami and Los Angeles, the extent to which bicultural identity integration (BII; involving the ability to synthesise one's heritage and receiving cultural streams and to identify as a member of both cultures) is best understood as a developmental construct that changes over time or as an individual-difference construct that is largely stable over time. We were also interested in the extent to which these trajectories predicted mental health and family functioning. Recent-immigrant 9th graders (N = 302) were assessed 6 times from 9th to 12th grade. Latent class growth analyses using the first 5 timepoints identified 2 trajectory classes-one with lower BII scores over time and another with higher BII scores over time. Higher heritage and US identity at baseline predicted membership in the higher BII class. At the 6th study timepoint, lower BII adolescents reported significantly poorer self-esteem, optimism, prosocial behaviour and family relationships compared with their higher BII counterparts. These findings are discussed in terms of further research on the over-time trajectory of biculturalism, and on the need to develop interventions to promote BII as a way of facilitating well-being and positive family functioning. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · International Journal of Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: There has been increased recognition that identity operates within several “components” and that not every component is likely to be equally central to one’s sense of self. The aim of the current study was to determine the extent to which identity components (i.e., personal, relational, collective, and public) are differentially central to emerging adults’ identity. We used a two-step cluster analytic procedure to identify distinct clusters and determine how these configurations might differ in relation to psychosocial functioning (i.e., well-being, externalizing and internalizing symptoms, illicit drug use, risky sex, and impaired driving). The sample consisted of 8,309 college students (72.8% female; Mage = 19.94 years, 18-29, SD = 2.01) from 30 U.S. colleges and universities. Analyses identified six unique clusters based on the centrality of the four identity components. The findings indicated that a more well-rounded identity was associated with the most favorable psychosocial functioning. Results are discussed in terms of important directions for identity research and practical implications.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Emerging Adulthood
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the latent personal-social identity profiles that emerged from simultaneous consideration of ethnic, national (United States), and personal identities among ethnic minority college students (N = 3,009) as well as how personal and social identities are jointly associated with self-esteem. Results indicated that the structure of personal-social identity profiles significantly differed across ethnicity, but also indicated some commonalities. The study identified three profiles among Blacks, four among Asian Americans, and two among Latinos. Some personal-social identity profiles were common across multiple ethnic groups, but others were unique within one specific ethnic group. Overall, the profiles indicated important associations between ethnic identity, U.S. identity, and personal identity. These profiles were linked with self-esteem such that individuals who reported high levels of multiple social and personal identities had the highest self-esteem compared to other profiles.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Identity
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    ABSTRACT: This 2½-year, 5-wave longitudinal study tests the hypothesis that acculturation discrepancies between Hispanic immigrant parents and adolescents would lead to compromised family functioning, which would then lead to problematic adolescent outcomes. Recent-immigrant Hispanic parent-adolescent dyads (N = 302) completed measures of acculturation and family functioning. Adolescents completed measures of positive youth development, depressive symptoms, problem behavior, and substance use. Results indicated that Time 1 discrepancies in Hispanic-culture retention, and linear trajectories in some of these discrepancies, negatively predicted adolescent positive youth development, and positively predicted adolescent depressive symptoms and binge drinking, indirectly through adolescent-reported family functioning. The vast majority of effects were mediated rather than direct, supporting the acculturation discrepancy hypothesis. Implications for further research and intervention are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Research on Adolescence
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    ABSTRACT: A burgeoning literature supports a link between alcohol use and panic-spectrum problems (e.g., panic attacks, disorder) among adolescents, but the direction of influence has yet to be properly examined. From a theoretical perspective, panic-spectrum problems may increase risk for problematic drinking via affect regulation efforts (e.g., self-medication), and problematic consumption also may increase or initiate panic-relevant responding (e.g., learning or kindling models). The objective of the current investigation was to examine the role of prior alcohol use in predicting panic-relevant responding, as well as panic symptom history in predicting the desire to consume alcohol, in the context of either a voluntary hyperventilation or a low-arousal task. Participants were community-recruited adolescents aged 12-17 years (n = 92, Mage = 15.42, SD = 1.51; 39.1% girls). Results indicated that prior alcohol use predicted panic-relevant responding among those undergoing the hyperventilation task (but not the low-arousal task), and that this finding was robust to the inclusion of theoretically relevant covariates (i.e., age, sex, negative affectivity). However, panic symptom history did not predict the desire to consume alcohol as a function of either the hyperventilation or low-arousal condition. This work sheds further light on the nature of the relation between panic-spectrum problems and problematic alcohol use in adolescence. Specifically, the current findings suggest that frequent alcohol use may increase panic vulnerability among adolescents, whereas acute panic symptoms may not elicit the immediate (self-reported) desire to drink. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: Prior person-centered research has consistently identified a subgroup of highly religious participants that uses significantly less alcohol when compared to the other subgroups. The construct of religious motivation is absent from existing examinations of the nuanced combinations of religiousness dimensions within persons, and alcohol expectancy valuations have yet to be included as outcome variables. Variable-centered approaches have found religious motivation and alcohol expectancy valuations to play a protective role against individuals' hazardous alcohol use. The current study examined latent religiousness profiles and hazardous alcohol use in a large, multisite sample of ethnically diverse college students. The sample consisted of 7412 college students aged 18-25 (M age = 19.77, SD age = 1.61; 75 % female; 61 % European American). Three latent profiles were derived from measures of religious involvement, salience, and religious motivations: Quest-Intrinsic Religiousness (highest levels of salience, involvement, and quest and intrinsic motivations; lowest level of extrinsic motivation), Moderate Religiousness (intermediate levels of salience, involvement, and motivations) and Extrinsic Religiousness (lowest levels of salience, involvement, and quest and intrinsic motivations; highest level of extrinsic motivation). The Quest-Intrinsic Religiousness profile scored significantly lower on hazardous alcohol use, positive expectancy outcomes, positive expectancy valuations, and negative expectancy valuations, and significantly higher on negative expectancy outcomes, compared to the other two profiles. The Extrinsic and Moderate Religiousness profiles did not differ significantly on positive expectancy outcomes, negative expectancy outcomes, negative expectancy valuations, or hazardous alcohol use. The results advance existing research by demonstrating that the protective influence of religiousness on college students' hazardous alcohol use may involve high levels on both quest and intrinsic religious motivation.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Journal of Youth and Adolescence
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    ABSTRACT: Though social anxiety disorder and alcohol use disorders commonly co-occur, the mechanisms involved in social anxiety and hazardous drinking among college students are not well understood. The current study contributes to the emerging literature on social anxiety and college drinking as the first known study to test how positive (e.g. “I would feel at ease in social situations”) and negative (e.g. “I would make a fool out of myself”) alcohol outcome expectancies (AOE) specific to social situations (social AOE) impact the association between social anxiety and hazardous alcohol use among 718 undergraduates (61% women; Mage = 19.50, SD = 1.45; 85% White). Results supported the mediation, but not the moderation models. There were positive indirect effects of social anxiety through positive social AOE and negative indirect effects of social anxiety through negative social AOE on both hazardous drinking outcomes (i.e. alcohol consumption and alcohol problems). Findings suggest that there could be competing pathways for increasing (positive social AOE) and decreasing (negative AOE) risk for hazardous alcohol use in socially anxious college students.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Addiction Research and Theory
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined longitudinal effects of cultural stress (a latent factor comprised of bicultural stress, ethnic discrimination, and negative context of reception) on depressive symptoms and a range of externalizing behaviors among recently (≤5 years in the U.S. at baseline) immigrated Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 adolescents (53% boys; mean age 14.51 years) completed baseline measures of perceived ethnic discrimination, bicultural stress, and perceived negative context of reception; and outcome measures of depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, aggressive behavior, and rule-breaking behavior six months post-baseline. A path analysis indicated that higher cultural stress scores predicted higher levels of all outcomes. These effects were consistent across genders, but varied by study site. Specifically, higher cultural stress scores increased depressive symptoms among participants in Miami, but not in Los Angeles. Findings suggest that cultural stress is a clinically relevant predictor of depressive symptoms and externalizing behaviors among Hispanic immigrant adolescents. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Adolescence
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was conducted to contribute to our understanding of young adult identity development by deriving latent profiles from intrapersonal and interpersonal indices of identity synthesis and confusion. A sample of 9737 college-attending young adults completed measures of identity, mental health, and health risk behaviors. Four latent profiles emerged: Synthesized (high synthesis, low confusion), Diffused (moderate synthesis, high confusion), Elevated (high synthesis and confusion), and Moderate (moderate synthesis and confusion). The Synthesized profile was associated with the highest well-being and the lowest levels of internalizing, externalizing, and health risks. The Diffused and Elevated profiles were both associated with low well-being and with high internalizing, externalizing, and risky behaviors — with the Elevated profile highest on all of the negative outcomes. The Moderate profile scored intermediately on well-being, internalizing, externalizing, and health risks. These results are discussed in terms of the role of identity within a successful transition to adulthood.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: A drinking game (DG) is a high-risk, social drinking activity that consists of certain rules (i.e., when to drink and how much to consume) designed to promote inebriation and that requires each player to perform a cognitive and/or motor task (Zamboanga et al., 2013). Research suggests that non-White or female students who play DGs are at an increased risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems. Thus, this study examined whether the associations between DG participation and alcohol-related problems were similar for men and women and across ethnic groups. Method: College students (N=7409; 73% women; 64% White, 8% Black, 14% Hispanic, 14% Asian) from 30 U.S. colleges/universities completed self-report questionnaires. Results: Controlling for age, site, Greek membership (i.e., membership in a fraternity or sorority), and typical alcohol consumption, results indicated that the association between DG participation and alcohol-related problems was stronger for men compared to women. With respect to ethnicity, the association between these variables was stronger among Black women than Black men. Conclusions: Findings from this large-scale study highlight the need to closely investigate how gender and ethnicity moderate the associations between DG participation and alcohol-related problems. College intervention efforts designed to address high-risk drinking behaviors such as DG participation might consider paying close attention to ethnic minority populations, perhaps particularly Black women.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Addictive Behaviors
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to examine acculturative changes, and their effects on mental health and family functioning, in recent-immigrant Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 Hispanic adolescents was assessed five times over a 2½-year period. Participants completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. practices, collectivist and individualist values, and ethnic and U.S. identity at each time point. Baseline and Time 5 levels of mental health and family functioning were also assessed. Latent class growth analyses produced two-class solutions for practices, values, and identifications. Adolescents who increased over time in practices and values reported the most adaptive mental health and family functioning. Adolescents who did not change in any acculturation domain reported the least favorable mental health and family functioning. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Child Development

Publication Stats

2k Citations
245.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2015
    • Smith College
      • Psychology
      Нортхемптон, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009
    • University of Miami
      • Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
      كورال غيبلز، فلوريدا, Florida, United States
  • 2005
    • University of California, Davis
      • Department of Anthropology
      Davis, California, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Nebraska at Omaha
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • 2000-2003
    • University of Nebraska at Lincoln
      • Department of Psychology
      Lincoln, Nebraska, United States