Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo

Institut Marqués, Spain, Barcelona, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (45)398.48 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the hemostatic alterations in blood from healthy individuals treated for 5 days with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) rivaroxaban (20 mg/d) or dabigatran (150 mg/12 h) in a single-blind clinical trial with crossover assignment (NCT01478282). We assessed the potential of prothrombin complex concentrates, activated prothrombin complex concentrates, or recombinant activated factor VII, when added ex vivo, to reverse the alterations caused by these DOACs. Blood was drawn at maximum plasma concentration after the last dose of each DOAC, and modifications in coagulation biomarkers were evaluated using a series of tests performed under steady conditions including routine coagulation, thrombin generation, and thromboelastometry assays. Additional studies in standardized flow devices were applied to evaluate alterations on platelet deposition and fibrin formation on damaged vascular surfaces exposed to flowing blood. Both DOACs caused important modifications of all coagulation biomarkers and significantly reduced fibrin formation in flow studies. Alterations in biomarkers observed in steady laboratory tests were normalized and occasionally overcompensated by procoagulant strategies. In contrast, reductions in fibrin formation observed in studies with flowing blood were improved, although never completely restored to baseline levels. Effects of dabigatran in flow studies appeared more resistant to reversal strategies than those of rivaroxaban. Inconsistencies between results of coagulation studies in steady or flowing assays not only raise concerns about the adequacy of the earlier tests to predict the restoration of the coagulopathy induced by DOACs but also suggest limitations of nonspecific procoagulant strategies to control severe coagulopathy in patients inadvertently overexposed these agents.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Transfusion medicine reviews
  • Gines Escolar · Xavier Carne · Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Vitamin K antagonists were the only oral anticoagulants available for several decades, but they require frequent coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment. The direct oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban , dabigatran, apixaban, and, most recently, edoxaban have been approved for the management of specific thromboembolic indications. Areas covered: This review will provide a brief overview of the cell-based coagulation model, the main determinants of arterial and venous thrombosis, and the pharmacological rationale and clinical evidence for the different dosing regimens of rivaroxaban. Published articles indexed on PubMed and Medline covering arterial and venous thrombi pathophysiology, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of rivaroxaban, and Phase II and Phase III clinical studies with rivaroxaban as well as real-world evidence were analyzed. Expert opinion: Education on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics, as well as how to manage adverse events, is needed to increase physician knowledge and confidence in using direct oral anticoagulants, as specifically discussed for rivaroxaban in this article. The continued uptake of direct oral anticoagulants in clinical practice depends on understanding of the clinical evidence and reassurance provided by emerging real-world data.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology
  • Joan Cid · Gloria Carbassé · Montse Gamir · María Jiménez · Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo · Miguel Lozano
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    ABSTRACT: Metabolic alkalosis occurs as a direct result of plasma exchange (PE) because of metabolism of citrate. However, we observed a decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate after PE when albumin was used as replacement fluid. The acid-base balance in 2730 PEs using different replacement fluids (albumin, fresh-frozen plasma [FFP], or both) was measured, and absolute changes (Δ) in acid-base balance were compared. The frequency of adverse effects (AEs) before and after using prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate was compared. A decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate was observed after PEs when albumin was used as replacement fluid (Δ pH = -0.06 ± 0.04; Δ bicarbonate = -4.03 ± 2.29 mmol/L; Δ base excess = -2.54 ± 3.82 mmol/L). An increase of serum pH and bicarbonate was observed after PEs when FFP was used as replacement fluid (Δ pH = +0.04 ± 0.05; Δ bicarbonate = +3.6 ± 3.68 mmol/L; Δ base excess = +1.62 ± 4.51 mmol/L). The prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate corrected partially the decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate after finishing PEs when albumin was used as replacement fluid (Δ pH = -0.04 ± 0.04; Δ bicarbonate = -3.1 ± 2.47 mmol/L; Δ base excess = -3.35 ± 3.06 mmol/L). The frequency of AEs after using prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate was lower in comparison with the frequency of AEs before using prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate (2.0% vs. 4.8%; p < 0.001). A decrease of serum pH and bicarbonate appeared in patients after PEs when albumin was used as replacement fluid; it was corrected partially with prophylactic administration of sodium bicarbonate, and it was associated with fewer AEs. © 2015 AABB.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Transfusion
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    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: It is unclear whether anticoagulation guidelines intended for the general population are applicable to patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). In the present study, the risk of thrombotic recurrence was analyzed in 150 patients with PV and ET treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) because of an arterial or venous thrombosis. After an observation period of 963 patient-years, the incidence of re-thrombosis was 4.5 and 12 per 100 patient-years under VKA therapy and after stopping it, respectively (P < 0.0005). After a multivariate adjustment for other prognostic factors, VKA treatment was associated with a 2.8-fold reduction in the risk of thrombotic recurrence. Notably, VKA therapy offset the increased risk of re-thrombosis associated with a prior history of remote thrombosis. Both the protective effect of VKA therapy and the predisposing factors for recurrence were independent of the anatomical site involved in the index thrombosis. Treatment periods with VKA did not result in a higher incidence of major bleeding as compared with those without VKA. These findings support the use of long-term anticoagulation for the secondary prevention of thrombosis in patients with PV and ET, particularly in those with history of remote thrombosis.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Annals of Hematology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Despite the good safety of rivaroxaban, there is limited information on strategies for urgent reversal of its antihemostatic effects. Methods and results: Alterations of hemostasis induced by rivaroxaban (230 ng/ml) were assessed by using several tests applied to steady and circulating human blood. Effects on thrombin generation (TG) and thromboelastometry (TEM) parameters were measured. Modifications in platelet adhesive, aggregating and procoagulant activities were evaluated in studies with circulating blood. The potential reversal of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs; 50 IU/kg), activated PCCs (aPCCs; 75 IU/kg), or recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa; 270 μg/kg) was evaluated. Impairment of TG parameters induced by rivaroxaban were corrected by the different concentrates (aPCC≥PCC>rFVIIa). Prolonged clotting times and reduced clot firmness caused by rivaroxaban on TEM tests were improved by different concentrates (rFVIIa≥aPCC>PCC). Rivaroxaban significantly reduced platelets and fibrin interactions with damaged vascular surfaces in perfusion studies. While alterations of platelet interactions were favourably counteracted by rFVIIa or aPCCs, reductions in fibrin formation were only partially restored by the different factor concentrates (rFVIIa>aPCC≥PCC). Conclusions: Rivaroxaban-induced alterations on coagulation parameters measured through assays performed under static conditions were easily reversed by the different concentrates. Studies under flow conditions revealed that these concentrates normalized the action of rivaroxaban on platelets, and significantly improved fibrin formation; although in the later case, levels were not restored to the pre-treatment value.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Circulation Journal
  • Gines Escolar · Maribel Diaz-Ricart · Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo · Ana M Galán
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Thromboembolic diseases will become the most important contributors to mortality and morbidity for modern societies. Current antithrombotic strategies using heparins or vitamin K antagonists are inconvenient, with limitations and inherent side effects. A series of new oral anticoagulants with powerful and reliable antithrombotic actions have been developed in the last decade. Areas covered: Edoxaban is a direct and specific inhibitor of activated factor X, delivered orally. This article reviews literature from PubMed and articles referenced within. The text explores the pharmacological aspects of its antithrombotic action. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism and drug interactions are examined. The review places the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated the antithrombotic potential of edoxaban versus standard antithrombotic therapies in the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism into perspective. The possible relationship between the pharmacokinetic profile of edoxaban and the favorable results in clinical trials is discussed. Expert opinion: Edoxaban is perceived as a major advance, compared to vitamin K antagonists, in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease given its favorable efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetic profile and renal clearance. The results of ongoing large international trials exploring the prevention of thrombotic complications in patients in different clinical settings should ensure the approval of edoxaban to treat new indications.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology
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    ABSTRACT: Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant with a specific inhibitory action on FXa. No information is available on the reversal of the antihemostatic action of apixaban in experimental or clinical settings. We have evaluated the effectiveness of different factor concentrates at reversing modifications of hemostatic mechanisms induced by moderately elevated concentrations of apixaban (200 ng/ml) added in vitro to blood from healthy donors (n = 10). Effects on thrombin generation (TG) and thromboelastometry (TEM) parameters were assessed. Modifications in platelet adhesive, aggregating and procoagulant activities were evaluated in studies with blood circulating through damaged vascular surfaces, at a shear rate of 600 s(-1). The potential of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs; 50 IU/kg), activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCCs; 75 IU/kg), or activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa; 270 μg/kg), at reversing the antihemostatic actions of apixaban, were investigated. Apixaban interfered with TG kinetics. Delayed lag phase, prolonged time to peak and reduced peak values, were improved by the different concentrates, though modifications in TG patterns were diversely affected depending on the activating reagents. Apixaban significantly prolonged clotting times (CTs) in TEM studies. Prolongations in CTs were corrected by the different concentrates with variable efficacies (rFVIIa≥aPCC>PCC). Apixaban significantly reduced fibrin and platelet interactions with damaged vascular surfaces in perfusion studies (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Impairments in fibrin formation were normalized by the different concentrates. Only rFVIIa significantly restored levels of platelet deposition. Alterations in hemostasis induced by apixaban were variably compensated by the different factor concentrates investigated. However, effects of these concentrates were not homogeneous in all the tests, with PCCs showing more efficacy in TG, and rFVIIa being more effective on TEM and perfusion studies. Our results indicate that rFVIIa, PCCs and aPCCs have the potential to restore platelet and fibrin components of the hemostasis previously altered by apixaban.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    L Pujadas-Mestres · G Escolar · E Arellano-Rodrigo · A M Galán
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional anticoagulant therapies can significantly reduce the risk of stroke and related complications in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Classic oral anticoagulants based on vitamin K antagonism have shown effectiveness in the prevention of thromboembolic complications in this clinical setting. Unfortunately, vitamin K antagonists that have shown effectiveness in the prevention of thromboembolic complications in patients with nonvalvular AF hold inherent limitations including delayed onset of action, narrow therapeutic index, variability of their response, need for repeated control and numerous interactions with food and other drugs. Since the frequency of stroke related to AF increases with age, guidelines from different scientific societies advise that the risk of bleeding for a patient should be quantified before exposure to anticoagulation and balanced against the risk of stroke with and without anticoagulation. A consequence of assessing this risk/benefit balance is that not all patients with AF at thromboembolic risk receive adequate anticoagulant treatment. Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant with a direct, specific and reversible inhibitory action on coagulation factor Xa and with demonstrated safety and efficacy in the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in several clinical studies involving thousands of patients subjected to major orthopedic surgery. Results of two large phase III trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with aspirin or warfarin, in the prevention of stroke in patients with AF. Apixaban demonstrated superiority over classic vitamin K antagonists on the previously specified outcomes of stroke, systemic embolism, major bleeding and death. For those patients unsuitable for treatment with vitamin K antagonists because of an excessive bleeding risk, apixaban showed more efficacy than aspirin in stroke prevention with a not statistically significant modest increase of major bleeding.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Drugs of today (Barcelona, Spain: 1998)
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of low-dose aspirin in the primary prevention of thrombosis in patients with high-risk essential thrombocythaemia (ET) treated with cytoreductive drugs is not well established. The risk-benefit balance of low-dose aspirin plus cytoreductive therapy compared with cytoreduction alone was retrospectively analysed in 247 patients with high-risk ET without prior thrombosis. Follow-up was 763 and 685 person-years for cytoreduction plus low-dose aspirin and cytoreduction alone, respectively. The rate of thrombosis was not significantly reduced in patients on cytoreduction plus aspirin (14·4 events per 1000 person-years) when compared with those on cytoreduction alone (24·8 events per 1000 person-years; P = 0·2). However, in the subgroup of patients older than 60 years, the addition of low-dose aspirin was associated with a significantly lower rate of thrombosis (8·6 vs. 29·2 thrombosis per 1000 person-years for combined treatment and cytoreduction alone, respectively, P = 0·02). The rate of major bleeding was significantly higher with combined therapy than with cytoreduction alone both in the whole series (14·4 vs. 1·4 haemorrhagic events per 1000 person-years, respectively, P = 0·006) and in the subgroup of patients older than 60 years. In conclusion, low-dose aspirin benefits high-risk ET patients older than 60 years receiving cytoreductive therapy as primary prophylaxis of thrombosis.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · British Journal of Haematology
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates whether the response criteria proposed by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) to evaluate cytoreductive therapies in essential thrombocythemia (ET) correlate with clinically relevant outcomes in patients receiving anagrelide. We evaluated 154 ET patients treated with anagrelide (upfront in 87) for a median of 2.9 years. Complete response (CR), partial response, and no response were observed in 56, 30.5, and 13.5 % patients, respectively. Only 38 patients (25 %) achieved a sustained CR. Overall, the aggregated time on CR and without CR was 200.1 and 333.6 person-years, respectively. The incidence rate of thrombosis and hemorrhage was independent of the CR status. The only factor associated with shorter survival after anagrelide start was the patient's age, whereas achieving a CR with anagrelide had no predictive value for subsequent survival. In conclusion, CR according to the ELN definition is not associated with any measurable clinical benefit in ET patients treated with anagrelide.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Annals of Hematology

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Blood

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Thrombosis Research
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    ABSTRACT: Criteria of response and definition of resistance and intolerance to hydroxyurea (HU) in polycythemia vera (PV) were proposed by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN). Such criteria were evaluated in 261 PV patients (median follow-up, 7.2 years) treated with HU for a median of 4.4 years. Complete response, partial response, and no response were observed in 24%, 66%, and 10% of patients, respectively. Achieving ELN response (complete or partial) or hematocrit response did not result in better survival or less thrombosis and bleeding. On the contrary, having no response in leukocyte count was associated with higher risk of death (HR, 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3%-5.4%; P = .007), whereas lack of response in platelet count involved a higher risk of thrombosis and bleeding. Resistance and intolerance to HU was registered in 11% and 13% of patients, respectively. Resistance to HU was associated with higher risk of death (HR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.7%-11.9%; P < .001) and transformation (HR, 6.8; 95% CI, 3.0%-15.4%; P < .001). In summary, fulfilling the ELN definition for response to HU was not associated with a benefit in the clinical outcome in PV, whereas response in platelet and white blood cell counts were predictive of less thrombohemorrhagic complications and better prognosis, respectively. Resistance to HU was an adverse prognostic factor.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: Neutrophil and platelet activation are consistently found in essential thrombocythemia (ET), but the techniques employed to demonstrate such abnormalities are complex. To ascertain whether the ADVIA 120 analyzer can be employed to assess neutrophil and platelet activation status in ET, 55 such patients and the same number of matched healthy individuals were studied and the results correlated with neutrophil CD11b and platelet P-selectin expressions measured by flow cytometry. Compared with controls, ET patients had significantly higher values of neutrophil myeloperoxidase index (MPXI), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and platelet component distribution width, and significantly lower values of neutrophil lobularity index and mean platelet component (MPC). Patients with the JAK2 mutation had significantly lower values of MPC and higher values of MPV and PDW than those with wild-type allele. A positive correlation was observed between MPXI and neutrophil CD11b expression and a negative correlation between MPC and platelet P-selectin expression. The intensity of the agreement between the variables obtained by the two methods was moderate. These results support the possible value of MPC as surrogate parameter of platelet activation in ET.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2011 · Platelets
  • Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo

    No preview · Article · Feb 2011 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo

    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Hydroxyurea (HU) is frequently given as treatment for myelofibrosis (MF), but data on its efficacy and tolerability are scarce. The results of HU therapy were evaluated in 40 patients with hyperproliferative manifestations of primary (n = 32), post-polycythemia vera (n = 6), or post-essential thrombocythemia (n = 2) myelofibrosis. Median interval between diagnosis and HU start was 6.2 months (range 0-141.7). Reasons for treatment were constitutional symptoms (55%), symptomatic splenomegaly (45%), thrombocytosis (40%), leukocytosis (28%), pruritus (10%), and bone pain (8%). The starting dose was 500 mg/day, subsequently adjusted to the individual efficacy and tolerability. Response was bone pain 100%, constitutional symptoms 82%, pruritus 50%, splenomegaly 40%, and anemia 12.5%. According to the International Working Group for Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment criteria, clinical improvement was achieved in 16 patients (40%). Median duration of response was 13.2 months (range 3-126.2). Worsening of the anemia or appearance of pancytopenia were observed in 18 patients, requiring administration of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (n = 17) and/or danazol (n = 9). Oral or leg ulcers appeared in five patients and one had gastrointestinal symptoms. HU is an effective and generally well-tolerated therapy for the hyperproliferative manifestations of MF. The accentuation of the anemia often induced by HU is usually manageable with concomitant treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · Annals of Hematology
  • Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo · Alberto Alvarez-Larrán

    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · New England Journal of Medicine
  • Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo

    No preview · Article · Nov 2010 · New England Journal of Medicine

Publication Stats

859 Citations
398.48 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012-2015
    • Institut Marqués, Spain, Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2003-2015
    • University of Barcelona
      • Department of Medicine
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2002-2015
    • Hospital Clínic de Barcelona
      • Servicio de Hematología
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2007-2010
    • University Hospital Vall d'Hebron
      • Department of Cardiology
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2009
    • Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2005-2009
    • IDIBAPS August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain