Robert D Fanelli

Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons, Американ Форк, Utah, United States

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Publications (143)

  • Article · Aug 2016 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • Source
    Full-text Article · Jul 2016 · Surgical Endoscopy
  • Article · Jun 2016 · Surgical Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this document that updates a previously issued consensus statement and a technology status evaluation report on this topic.1 In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed between January 1975 and May 2015, with the use of the search terms "pancreatic AND malignancy," "endoscopy," "EUS," and "ERCP." Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When limited or no data existed from welldesigned prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Recommendations for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of recommendations contained in this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence. The strength of individual recommendations is based both on the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "we suggest," whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as "we recommend." This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. It is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decpuraging any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead anendoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these recommendations and suggestions.
    Article · Jan 2016 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • Robert D. Fanelli
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The SAGES Guideline Committee conducted an exhaustive literature review, a Delphi process, and focused interviews with thought leaders and Governing Board members to identify topics to be addressed by a new guideline about the ethical introduction of new technologies and techniques. Their primary goals were to fill knowledge gaps in existing literature and provide a framework useful to surgeons, patients, and health care constituents with regard to managing continual advances in technology. The guideline offers seven evidence-based recommendations, presented with quality ratings of supporting literature and recommendation strengths according to GRADE. Each advises readers on the various considerations important to the introduction, deployment, assessment, monitoring, and value of technological advances applied to clinical practice. SAGES advises all surgeons to consider carefully new technologies and techniques and to adopt a patient-first approach that ensures that self-determination and patient autonomy are preserved through transparency, management of conflicts of interest, and disclosure. Furthermore, it is advised that outcomes data be collected, and that value-based decisions be utilized whenever possible.
    Chapter · Jan 2016
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data existed from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was placed on results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy were based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines were drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the quality of the supporting evidence (Table 1) 1 The strength of individual recommendations is based on both the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "we suggest,"whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as "we recommend." This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines. For the purposes of this document, the terms African American, Hispanic, and Caucasian will be used for consistency.
    Article · Aug 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of position statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this article, MEDLINE and PubMed databases were used to search for publications between January 1975 and December 2013 pertaining to this topic. The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles'' feature of PubMed, with articles identified on MEDLINE and PubMed as the references. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data were available from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest." whereas stronger recommendations are stated as "We recommend.." The strength of individual recommendations was based on both the aggregate evidence quality (Table 1)(1) and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. ASGE position statements for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice and is solely intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This document is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from the recommendations and suggestions proposed in this document.
    Article · Aug 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed from January 1980 through October 2014 by using the keyword(s) "acute pancreatitis," "chronic pancreatitis," " autoimmune pancreatitis," " benign pancreatic disease," " gastrointestinal endoscopy," " endoscopy," and " endoscopic procedures." Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed, and additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence by using the GRADE criteria (Table 1).(1) This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    Article · Jun 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed, supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence (Table 1). This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    Article · May 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We recommend that uncomplicated GERD be diagnosed on the basis of typical symptoms without the use of diagnostic testing, including EGD. We recommend EGD for patients who have symptoms suggesting complicated GERD or alarm symptoms. We recommend that EGD not be routinely performed solely for the assessment of extraesophageal GERD symptoms. We recommend that endoscopic findings of reflux esophagitis be classified according to an accepted grading scale or described in detail. We suggest that repeat EGD be performed in patients with severe erosive esophagitis after at least an 8-week course of PPI therapy to exclude underlying BE or dysplasia. We recommend against obtaining tissue samples from endoscopically normal tissue to diagnose GERD or exclude BE in adults. We suggest that endoscopy be considered in patients with multiple risk factors for Barrett's esophagus. We recommend that tissue samples be obtained to confirm endoscopically suspected Barrett's esophagus. We suggest that endoscopic antireflux therapy be considered for selected patients with uncomplicated GERD after careful discussion with the patient regarding potential adverse effects, benefits, and other available therapeutic options. Copyright
    Article · Apr 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy ( ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature by using PubMed from January 1980 through March 2014 was performed by using the keywords "inflammatory bowel disease," "Crohn's disease," "ulcerative colitis," "gastrointestinal endoscopy,'' "endoscopy,'' "endoscopic procedures,'' and "procedures.''Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed, and additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data existed from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence by using the GRADE criteria1 (Table 1). This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    Article · Mar 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text in conjunction with representatives from the Society of Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). In preparing this document, MEDLINE and PubMed databases were used to search for publications between January 1980 and December 2013 pertaining to this topic by using the key words "bariatric surgery" and "endoscopy." The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed with articles identified on MEDLINE and PubMed as the references. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data were available from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest.," whereas stronger recommendations are stated as "We recommend.." The strength of individual recommendations was based on both the aggregate evidence quality (Table 1)1 and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. ASGE position statements for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice and is solely intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This document is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from the recommendations and suggestions proposed in this document. Copyright
    Article · Feb 2015 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) provides an opposing view to the conclusions in the published article by Lipka et al, "No Evidence for Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Article · Feb 2015 · Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed from January 1980 through December 2013 by using the keyword(s) "choledocholithiasis," "biliary stricture," "primary sclerosing cholangitis," "cholangiopathy," "sphincter of Oddi dysfunction," "biliary leak," "choledochal cyst," "choledochocele," AND "gastrointestinal endoscopy," "ERCP," "endoscopy," and "endoscopic procedures." The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed, with articles identified on PubMed as the references. Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data exist from well-designed projective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence using the GRADE criteria1 (Table 1). Copyright
    Article · Feb 2015 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • Article · Jan 2015 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this document, and it updates a previously issued document on this topic. 1 In preparing this guideline, MEDLINE and PubMed databases were used to search for publications between January 1975 and December 2013 pertaining to this topic. The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed, with articles identified on MEDLINE and PubMed as the references. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data were available from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest..." whereas stronger recommendations are stated as "We recommend..." The strength of individual recommendations was based on both the aggregate evidence quality (Table 1)(2) and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. ASGE guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice and is solely intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This document is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from the recommendations and suggestions proposed in this document.
    Article · Nov 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • Article · Oct 2014 · Surgical Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this guideline. In preparing this document, MEDLINE databases were used to search for publications pertaining to this topic between January 1990 and December 2013. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data exist from well-designed, prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. The reported evidence and recommendations on the basis of reviewed studies were based on consensus opinion of the strength of the supporting evidence (Table 1).(1) The strength of individual recommendations is based on both the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest...," whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as " We recommend...." ASGE guidelines for the appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice and is solely intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This document is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from the recommendations and suggestions proposed in this document.
    Article · Aug 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy prepared this text. In preparing this document, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When limited or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Recommendations for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence (Table 1).(1) This document is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. It is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these recommendations.
    Article · Aug 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This is a clinical update discussing the use of periendoscopic laboratory testing in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this document by using MEDLINE and PubMed databases to search for publications between January 1990 and December 2013 pertaining to this topic. The keywords "endoscopy" and "laboratory" were used with each of the following: "preanesthesia," "preoperative," "routine," "screening," and "testing." The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed with articles identified on MEDLINE and PubMed as the references. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data were available from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest...," whereas stronger recommendations are stated as "We recommend..." The strength of individual recommendations was based on both the aggregate evidence quality (Table 1)(1) and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. ASGE guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice and is solely intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This document is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from the recommendations and suggestions proposed in this document.
    Article · Jul 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Publication Stats

7k Citations

Institutions

  • 2006
    • Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons
      Американ Форк, Utah, United States
  • 2003-2006
    • American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
      Oak Brook, Illinois, United States