Katia Longo

Parthenope University of Naples, Napoli, Campania, Italy

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Publications (50)208.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Both low serum uric acid (UA) levels and apathy are considered biomarkers of cognitive decline and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD). There is an urgent need to combine different biomarkers to predict disease course in PD. Data on the relationship between serum UA levels and apathy in PD are lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between serum UA levels and pure apathy in early, drug-naïve PD patients. Forty-nine early, drug-naïve PD patients were enrolled and stratified into two groups using the median serum UA levels at diagnosis (Group 1 serum UA ≤ 4.8 mg/dl; Group 2 serum UA > 4.8 mg/dl). The cohort was followed for the first 2 years of disease. Apathy was evaluated with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES). Patients with lower serum UA levels presented significant higher AES score compared to patients with higher serum UA levels. Regression analysis showed that baseline serum UA levels were significant determinants of AES scores at both baseline and 2-year follow up, irrespective of gender, age, attention/executive functions and dopamine replacement therapy when applicable. This is the first study showing a link between serum UA levels and apathy in non-demented, non-depressed, early, drug-naïve PD, being lower serum UA levels associated with greater apathy. Further follow up of our patients and replication of this observation in independent cohorts are needed to establish if this combination of biomarkers may help in characterizing a subgroup of PD patients at diagnosis.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Neural Transmission
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    ABSTRACT: Study objectives: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) has a prevalence of 0% to 52% in Parkinson disease (PD). However, it is still debated whether RLS in PD is a premotor feature, a motor complication, or an association by chance. The present study aims to evaluate RLS prevalence in de novo PD subjects, and incidence during 4-year follow-up, together with laboratory, clinical, and neuroradiological correlates. Design: This is a 4-year longitudinal study, with evaluations at the time of PD diagnosis, and after 2 and 4 years. Setting and patients: One hundred nine newly diagnosed, drug-naïve PD subjects were evaluated at the time of PD diagnosis, and after 2- and 4-year follow-ups at the Movement Disorder Unit of Federico II University Hospital, Naples, Italy. Interventions: Motor features, non-motor symptoms (NMS), concomitant dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic treatments were recorded. At baseline visit, 65 subjects were randomly selected to undergo a FP-CIT SPECT to study dopamine transporter availability. RLS diagnosis was performed with the RLS Diagnostic Index. Measurements and results: RLS prevalence rose from 4.6% (n = 5) at baseline evaluation to 6.5% after 2 years (n = 7) and to 16.3% after 4 years (n = 16) (P = 0.007). A multinomial logistic stepwise regression model selected NMS Questionnaire items more likely to be associated with RLS at diagnosis: (insomnia, OR = 15.555; P = 0.040) and with occurrence of RLS during follow-up (dizziness, OR=1.153; P = 0.022; and daytime sleepiness; OR = 9.557; P = 0.001), as compared to patients without RLS. Older age was more likely associated to increased RLS occurrence during follow-up in a random effect logistic regression model (OR=1.187; P = 0.036). A multinomial logistic stepwise model selected increased V3" values of affected caudate and putamen to be more likely associated with RLS presence at diagnosis (OR = 75.711; P = 0.077), and RLS occurrence during follow-up (OR = 12.004; P = 0.059), respectively, as compared to patients without RLS. Conclusions: RLS is present since PD diagnosis, and increases in prevalence during the course of PD. PD subjects with RLS have higher age at PD onset, more preserved dopaminergic pathways, and worse sleep and cardiovascular disturbances.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Sleep
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    ABSTRACT: In PD, Mild Cognitive Impairment (PD-MCI) occurs since early stages of disease. The aims were to assess presence of PD-MCI in untreated, drug-naive PD patients, and to follow-up the sample over 4 years to ascertain evolution of neurocognitive profile. Seventy-six patients underwent neuropsychological testing at baseline (T0), and after 2 (T1:n = 62) and 4 years (T2:n = 55). Diagnosis of PD-MCI and PD-associated dementia (PDD) was made according to current consensus criteria. PD-MCI occurred in 25/76 patients (32.9%) at baseline, and 4 of them reverted from PD-MCI to Normal Cognition (Reverters), 7 remained stable (Non-Reverters) and 2 developed PDD at T2; 12 patients were lost to the follow-up. Among the 51 patients with normal cognition (PD-CN) at T0, 27 had normal cognition at T2 (5 of them were Reverters with respect to diagnosis at T1), 5 had MCI at T1 and T2 (Non-Reverters), 9 had MCI at T2 only, whereas 1 developed PDD; 9 patients were lost to the follow-up. At baseline, Reverters (n = 9) had younger age at onset and better performance on constructional visuospatial task than Non-Reverters (n = 12). Compared to patients without PD-MCI at all evaluations (n = 19), Reverters had poorer performance on verbal immediate recall and attention tasks and higher level of apathy at T0. Reduced performance on the Stroop Test at baseline predicted PD-MCI at T2. Executive dysfunctions predicted development of PD-MCI after few years from onset. Reversal from PD-MCI to PD-CN was related to young age at onset and high level of apathy at baseline evaluation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purposeApathy may be either a symptom of major depression or a behavioral disturbance occurring in concomitance with depression or alone in Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the present study was to determine the progression of cognitive impairment in drug-naïve untreated PD patients with or without clinically significant apathy.Methods Sixty-two PD patients with a disease duration <2 years and without history of present or past therapy with pro-dopaminergic agents were included and underwent the Apathy Evaluation Scale (S-AES), a clinical interview based on diagnostic criteria for apathy and a comprehensive neuropsychological battery to assess memory, frontal functions and visuospatial functions. Two years after the first assessment, all patients were re-evaluated on the S-AES, a clinical interview and neuropsychological tests.ResultsAccording to the cut-off value of the S-AES and diagnostic criteria for apathy, eight patients experienced apathy at both baseline and follow-up (A+A+), nine patients had apathy only at follow-up (A−A+), 37 patients never experienced apathy (A−A−) and eight patients showed apathy at the baseline only (A+A−). Cognitive performance significantly declined in all four groups. At both baseline and follow-up A+A+ performed worse than A−A− on visuospatial and frontal tests; A−A+ had lower scores than A−A− on the interference task of the Stroop test (IT-ST). Regression analysis showed that poor performance on the IT-ST at baseline was the only independent predictor of onset of apathy at follow-up.Conclusions The results indicated a relationship between apathy and dysexecutive syndrome in early PD. Reduced scores on the IT-ST may predict development of apathy in PD patients.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · European Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Oxidative stress is a central pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease (PD), and the heme oxygenase (HO) bilirubin pathway is one of the main mammalian antioxidative defences. Indeed, there is growing evidence of HO-bilirubin upregulation from early phases of PD. Our aim was to investigate bilirubin as a possible biomarker of PD diagnosis and progression. A cross-sectional case-control study was performed to evaluate differences in bilirubin levels between newly diagnosed, drug-naïve PD subjects and controls. Afterwards, PD subjects were included in a 2-year longitudinal study to evaluate disease progression in relation to baseline bilirubin levels. Seventy-five de novo PD subjects were selected and matched with 75 controls by propensity score. Analysis of variance showed higher bilirubin levels in PD patients compared with controls (P < 0.001). Linear regression analysis failed to show a relationship between bilirubin and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III (P = 0.283) at baseline evaluation. At 2-year follow-up, indirect relationships between bilirubin levels and UPDRS part III (P = 0.028) and between bilirubin levels and levodopa-equivalent daily dosage (P = 0.012) were found. Parkinson's disease subjects showed higher levels of bilirubin compared with controls. Bilirubin increase might be due to HO overexpression as a compensatory response to oxidative stress occurring from early stages of PD. © 2015 EAN.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · European Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Apathy is a neuropsychiatric symptom in Parkinson's Disease (PD) which has a negative impact on quality of life and might be related in part to damage of presynaptic dopaminergic system. Little is known about relationship between striatal dopamine levels and apathy in PD patients without dementia and/or depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between "pure apathy" and striatal dopamine uptake in untreated, drug-naïve PD patients without clinically significant dementia and/or depression. Fourteen PD patients with pure apathy and 14 PD patients without apathy, matched for age, side of motor symptoms at onset, motor disability and disease duration, underwent both neuropsychological and behavioral examination including self-rated version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S). All patients underwent 123 I-FP-CIT (DaT-SCAN) SPECT to assess dopamine transporter (DAT) striatal uptake. PD patients with apathy showed lower DAT levels in the striatum than non-apathetic patients. After Bonferroni correction the difference between groups was significant in the right caudate. Apathy is associated with reduced striatal dopamine transporter levels, independent of motor disability and depression in non-demented PD patients. These findings suggest that dysfunction of dopaminergic innervation in the striatum and particularly in the right caudate may contribute to development of apathy in early PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: The variability in the clinical phenotype of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests the existence of several subtypes of the disease. Motor heterogeneity of PD is well established, but not nonmotor heterogeneity. At present, we are unable to predict the rate of progression of PD based on robust biomarkers. We aimed to examine the heterogeneity of PD by attempting to identify nonmotor factors associated with the rate of motor progression and functional decline, as measured by the time to reach the need for levodopa therapy during the first 4 years from diagnosis in a cohort of de novo PD patients. The median time to introduction of l-dopa for patients with urinary symptoms was significantly shorter than that for those without (20 vs. 37 months; P = 0.001). Cox's regression models showed that the urinary domain was associated with a higher probability of starting l-dopa (hazard ratio: 2.1; P = 0.002). There was no influence of such confounders as sex, age, baseline motor features, use of dopamine agonists and/or monoamine oxidase B inhibitors, and total l-dopa equivalent daily dosage. Patients with urinary symptoms had higher baseline and follow-up motor and nonmotor disturbances than those without. Our study suggests the existence of a subgroup of patients who show urinary symptoms along with an overall higher motor and nonmotor burden. Such patients are prone to manifest a rapid functional decline over the first 4 years of the disease. Urinary symptoms might be a clinical marker of severity as well as a possible nonmotor subtype of PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Movement Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a common feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). We performed an exploratory study to investigate dopaminergic nigrostriatal innervation and its cognitive correlates in early untreated PD patients with MCI as compared to cognitively intact patients. A consecutive series of 34-de-novo, drug-naïve patients with PD were enrolled. They underwent [123-I] FP-CIT SPECT and comprehensive neuropsychological battery. MCI was identified in 15 of 34 patients with PD. The two groups did not show any statistically significant difference in age, sex, disease duration, education, lateralization, and H&Y and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores. Logistic regression analysis showed that UPDRS-III was weakly associated with MCI (P = 0.034). Partial correlation analysis controlling for UPDRS-III and age suggested that in PD patients with MCI reduced V3″ values in the more affected caudate were correlated with reduced performances in frontal assessment battery, Trail Making Test: part B minus Part A and copy task of the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure test. Reduced V3″ values in the more and less affected putamen were significantly related with reduced performance in frontal assessment battery and in copy task of Rey-Osterrieth complex figure test, respectively. No correlation was found between neuropsychological scores and DAT availability in PD patients without MCI. Although preliminary, our results suggest that striatal dopamine depletion may contribute to some cognitive deficit in early never treated PD patients with MCI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Epidemiological studies report a 60-70% reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in smokers as compared to non-smokers. However, relationships between former smoking and PD have been poorly investigated. Methods: We recruited 116 de novo PD subjects, and investigated current, former and never smoking, and reasons for smoking cessation among former smokers. Two hundred and thirty-two controls were matched by Propensity Score. Results: PD subjects and controls were found to be current smokers (7.7 vs. 39.6%), former smokers (43.9 vs. 6.5%) and never smokers (48.2 vs. 53.9%). Logistic regression showed that current smokers were less likely to have PD (p < 0.001; OR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.10-0.46), while former smokers were more likely to have PD (p < 0.001; OR: 7.6; 95% CI: 4.09-15.75), as compared to never smokers. Fifty-one PD patients reported quitting smoking before PD diagnosis (mean time since cessation 9.4 ± 7.3 years). Most important reasons to quit smoking in PD group were illness different from PD (26 subjects, 51.0%), knowledge of the harmful effects of smoking (24 subjects, 47.0%), and physician's advice (1 subject, 2.0%). Conclusion: The reduced prevalence of current smokers among PD subjects as compared to healthy controls is consistent with previous findings, suggesting a possible neuroprotective effect of smoking. However, it could be due, at least in part, to the increased prevalence of former smokers among PD patients, that were more prone to quit smoking as compared to healthy controls. We suggest that smoking cessation could be an early preclinical condition occurring in PD.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Background Diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) and tracking its progression may require the combination of reliable biomarkers. Among them, both serum uric acid (UA) and dopamine transporter (DaT) binding deserve more investigations.Aims of the studyWe aimed to investigate the relationship between serum UA levels and DaT availability in newly diagnosed, drug-naïve PD patients, by means of semiquantitative [(123) I]FP-CIT-SPECT.Methods We recruited 52 newly diagnosed, drug-naïve PD patients, and performed serum UA dosage and [(123) I]FP-CIT-SPECT.ResultsPearson's correlation analysis showed that UA levels were significantly higher in patients with higher averaged, ipsilateral and contralateral DaT binding in caudate, putamen, and striatum.Conclusions We showed, for the first time, by regional semiquantitative analysis of DaT binding in PD patients that UA levels significantly correlates with the severity of dopaminergic impairment in caudate, putamen, and striatum. This study broadens our knowledge on the importance of UA as a biomarker of PD.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
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    ABSTRACT: Tremor dominant (TD) and akinetic-rigid type (ART) are two motor subtypes of Parkinson's disease associated with different disease progression and neurochemical/neuropathological features. The role of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic damage is still controversial, poorly explored, and only assessed in medicated patients. In this study, we investigated with FP-CIT SPECT the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in drug-naïve PD patients with ART and TD phenotypes. Fifty-one de novo, drug-naïve patients with PD underwent FP-CIT SPECT studies. Patients were evaluated with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III and Hoehn and Yahr scale (H&Y) and divided into ART (24/51) and TD (27/51) according to UPDRS part III. ART and TD patients were not different with regard to age, gender, and disease duration. However, compared to TD, ART patients presented higher UPDRS part III (p = 0.01) and H&Y (p = 0.02) and lower DAT availability in affected and unaffected putamen (p = 0.008 and p = 0.007, respectively), whereas no differences were found in caudate. Moreover, in the whole group of patients, rigidity and bradykinesia, but not tremor scores of UPDRS part III were significantly related to FP-CIT binding in the putamen. These results suggest that in newly diagnosed drug-naïve PD patients DAT availability might be different between ART and TD in relation to different disease severity.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purposeUric acid (UA) has been studied extensively as a valuable biomarker of Parkinson's disease (PD), but its relationship with non-motor symptoms (NMS) in de novo PD has been poorly investigated. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of baseline serum UA as a marker of NMS progression in newly diagnosed PD.Methods Sixty-nine newly diagnosed PD patients were enrolled. At baseline, all patients completed the NMS questionnaire (NMSQuest), and serum UA levels were measured. After 2 years, the NMSQuest was completed again and patients were categorized into four groups: NMS improvement (domain involvement at baseline but not at 2-year follow-up visit), NMS absence (domain not involved at baseline or 2-year follow-up visits), NMS presence (domain involvement both at baseline and 2-year follow-up visits) and NMS worsening (domain not involved at baseline but involved at 2-year follow-up).Resultsanova with post hoc Bonferroni correction showed that patients with NMS absence presented significantly higher UA values than patients with NMS presence with regard to the attention/memory (P = 0.023), depression/anxiety (P = 0.028) and cardiovascular domains (P = 0.002), whilst no differences were found with regard to both the NMS improvement and worsening groups. In addition, multinomial regression analysis showed that the lowest tertile of NMS progression presented higher UA levels (P = 0.023; odds ratio 0.488) compared with patients with greater NMS progression.Conclusions This is the first report of a relationship between serum UA and presence/progression of multiple NMS in de novo PD, providing additional evidence of the reliability of UA as a biomarker of PD and opening new insights on PD neuroprotection.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · European Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background We recently showed specific sex-related patterns of non motor symptoms (NMS) in early, drug-naïve PD patients. However, to date studies investigating gender-related effects of dopaminergic treatment on NMS in early PD are lacking. Methods In the present study, we first report a prospective assessment of gender-related differences in the spectrum of NMS before (baseline) and after starting dopaminergic therapy (2-year follow-up) in a large cohort of newly diagnosed PD patients. Differences in NMS frequency between baseline and follow-up were evaluated by McNemar test. Spearman's rank test was employed to explore interactions between NMS and drug treatment. Results One-hundred and thirty four PD patients (86M and 48W) were included in the present study. At 2-year follow-up, Sadness/blues presented a significant percentage reduction as compared to baseline in both sexes, while Urgency, Daytime sleepiness, Weight change and Sex drive presented a significant percentage increase only in men. At follow up men complained of a greater number of NMS as compared to women. Occurrence of Weight change was related to therapy in both sexes. Male gender was found to be a risk factor for developing Dribbling and Nocturia, irrespective of therapy and clinical features. Conclusions In conclusion, our study showed that mood symptoms improved after the introduction of therapy in both sexes, while men appeared to be more prone to develop some NMS possibly linked to dopaminergic treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Background Low serum uric acid (UA) has been consistently shown to be associated with increased risk of PD, and to predict faster motor and cognitive decline in established PD. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between serum UA and non-motor symptoms (NMS) de novo PD. Methods Serum UA was measured in consecutively recruited, early drug-naïve PD patients. Exclusion criteria were: treatment with UA modifying drugs; current smoking status; metabolic or cardiac morbidity. All patients completed the NMS Questionnaire (NMSQuest). The relationship between UA levels and NMSQuest domains was explored by logistic regression, subsequently adjusted for age, gender, disease duration (months since reported motor onset) UPDRS part III, H&Y scale, and MMSE. Regression analysis studied the overall relationship between UA levels and total NMS score, and subsequently adjusted for age, gender, disease duration UPDRS part III, H&Y scale and MMSE. Results Eighty PD patients were recruited. At logistic regression, higher UA levels were related to lower involvement of Attention/Memory (p=0.004), Cardiovascular (0.009) and Sleep (p=0.028) domains of NMSQuest. UA levels showed a significant negative correlation with total NMSQuest score at regression analysis (p=0.001; Adjusted R-squared=0.319). Discussion The present study investigated, for the first time, the relation between NMSQuest and UA in de novo PD. Lower UA was related to higher NMSQuest total score and in particular to Attention/Memory, Cardiovascular and Sleep domains. Thus, UA seems to be a major candidate to be a valuable biomarker of such early features of PD as NMS.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Longitudinal studies on healthy participants have shown that subjective memory impairment (defined as subjective cognitive complaints with normal cognitive objective performance) might be a strong predictor of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Parkinson disease (PD) also manifests cognitive disturbances, but whether subjective memory complaints may predict the development of MCI in PD has not yet been explored. We prospectively screened newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD in order to evaluate whether subjective memory complaints may predict development of MCI over a 2-year follow-up evaluation. We enrolled 76 de novo untreated patients with PD. Of the 76 patients, 23 (30.3%) complained memory issues. Among the patients cognitively unimpaired at baseline, those with subjective complaints were more likely to develop MCI at follow-up. The regression model confirmed that presence of subjective memory complaints at baseline was an independent predictor of development of MCI at follow-up. This is the first prospective study to explore the relationship between subjective and objective cognitive deficits in newly diagnosed, untreated patients. Our results provide preliminary evidence that subjective memory complaints might predict future development of MCI.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: 1)Detecting olfaction impairment may support the diagnosis of many ENT and Neurological diseases. The 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification test is one of the most frequently used identification test evaluating olfaction worldwide. 2)Smell identification tests can be significantly conditioned by age, gender and cultural background. Therefore, cultural adaptations and normative data are needed. 3)The 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification test was culturally adapted for Italian population and then administered with the help of a physician to 128 control subjects of different ages. 4)A correction grid for the 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification test raw scores was built according to age groups and gender. The cut-off value distinguishing between normal and pathological performances was fixed at 18.80, corresponding to the inner tolerance limit on the 5th centile. 5)The present data may implement the use of 40-item University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification test administered with the help of a physician in Italian population in both ENT and Neurology settings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Clinical otolaryngology: official journal of ENT-UK; official journal of Netherlands Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology & Cervico-Facial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the anatomical progression over the body segments of extrapyramidal signs in Parkinson's disease (PD); furthermore a great unmet need is the availability of instruments able to detect disease progression, even in the early phase. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that assessing topographical distribution of the cardinal motor features of PD may significantly improve the evaluation of disease progression in the early stages. Forty-four drug-naïve PD patients were included in the study. Presence or absence of bradykinesia, rest tremor and rigidity was derived from Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale part III (UPDRS-III) in five different anatomical segments: axial, right and left upper- and lower-limbs. Based on this approach, four new scores were computed evaluating the anatomical spread of the cardinal motor symptoms of PD on the five body segments over a 18-month follow-up period. The four new scores included: the Bradykinesia Segmental Score, the Tremor Segmental Score, the Rigidity Segmental Score, measuring the occurrence of each motor symptom in different segments and the Combined Segmental Score evaluating the occurrence of any motor symptom in different anatomical regions. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. The Combined Segmental Score showed a significant progression over time whereas the Hoehn and Yahr and the UPDRS-III scores did not. We suggest that a simple approach evaluating the anatomical distribution of motor symptoms and their progression over the body segments may be a useful complement to the classical rating tools to assess progression in early PD.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Gender differences in brain structure and function may lead to differences in the clinical expression of neurological diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Few studies reported gender-related differences in the burden of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in treated PD patients, but this matter has not been previously explored in drug-naïve PD patients. This study is to assess gender differences in the prevalence of NMS in a large sample of early, drug-naïve PD patients compared with age and sex-matched healthy controls. Two hundred early, drug-naïve PD patients and ninety-three age and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Frequency of NMS was evaluated by means of the Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire. The difference in gender distribution of NMS was evaluated with the χ 2 exact test; multiple comparisons were corrected with the Benjamini–Hochberg method. Male PD patients complained of problems having sex and taste/smelling difficulties significantly more frequently than female PD patients. Furthermore, men with PD complained more frequently of dribbling, sadness/blues, loss of interest, anxiety, acting during dreams, and taste/smelling difficulties as compared to healthy control men, while female PD patients reported more frequently loss of interest and anxiety as compared with healthy control women. This study shows specific sex-related patterns of NMS in drug-naïve PD. In contrast with previous data, female PD patients did not present higher prevalence of mood symptoms as compared to male PD patients. Comparison with healthy controls showed that some NMS classically present in premotor and early stage of disease (i.e., acting out during dreams, taste/smelling difficulties) are more frequent in male than in female patients.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: The variability in the clinical phenotype of Parkinson's disease seems to suggest the existence of several subtypes of the disease. To test this hypothesis we performed a cluster analysis using data assessing both motor and non-motor symptoms in a large cohort of newly diagnosed untreated PD patients. We collected data on demographic, motor, and the whole complex of non-motor symptoms from 100 consecutive newly diagnosed untreated outpatients. Statistical cluster analysis allowed the identification of different subgroups, which have been subsequently explored. THE DATA DRIVEN APPROACH IDENTIFIED FOUR DISTINCT GROUPS OF PATIENTS, WE HAVE LABELED: 1) Benign Pure Motor; 2) Benign mixed Motor-Non-Motor; 3) Non-Motor Dominant; and 4) Motor Dominant. Our results confirmed the existence of different subgroups of early PD patients. Cluster analysis revealed the presence of distinct subtypes of patients profiled according to the relevance of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Identification of such subtypes may have important implications for generating pathogenetic hypotheses and therapeutic strategies.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Background and purpose: Cognitive impairment is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages. We aimed to assess the relationship between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and cognitive functions in early, drug-naïve patients with PD. Methods: Serum IGF-1 was measured in 65 early, drug-naïve patients with PD that underwent a complete neuropsychological battery at baseline and after 2 years. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between neuropsychological scores and IGF-1. Repeated-measures anova was applied to assess changes in neuropsychological variables over time. Results: At baseline, IGF-1 levels were related to phonological fluency. At follow-up, IGF-1 levels were associated with the Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT) - immediate and delayed recall, Frontal Assessment Battery, verbal span and Benton judgement of the line orientation test. Patients with low IGF-1 levels at baseline showed a significantly faster decline of performances than patients with high IGF-1 levels on immediate and delayed recall of the RAVLT and interference task of the Stroop test. Conclusions: Low serum IGF-1 levels are related to poor performance on executive tasks in early, drug-naïve patients with PD, and may predict poor performance on attention/executive and verbal memory tasks after a 2-year follow-up.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · European Journal of Neurology

Publication Stats

850 Citations
208.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Parthenope University of Naples
      Napoli, Campania, Italy
  • 2003-2012
    • University of Naples Federico II
      • • Department of Neuroscience and Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences
      • • Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology
      Napoli, Campania, Italy