Gheeyoung Choe

Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (152)484.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and clinicopathological significance of c-MYC gene copy-number (GCN) gain in patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: The c-MYC GCN was investigated in 367 consecutive CRC patients (cohort 1) by using dual-color silver in situ hybridization. Additionally, to evaluate regional heterogeneity, we examined CRC tissue from 3 sites including the primary cancer, distant metastasis, and lymph-node metastasis in 152 advanced CRC patients (cohort 2). KRAS exons 2 and 3 were investigated for mutations. Results: In cohort 1, c-MYC gene amplification, defined by a c-MYC:centromere of chromosome 8 ratio ≥ 2.0, was detected in 31 (8.4%) of 367 patients. A c-MYC GCN gain, defined by ≥ 4.0 c-MYC copies/nucleus, was found in 63 (17.2%) patients and was associated with poor prognosis (P = 0.015). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the hazard ratio for c-MYC GCN gain was 2.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.453-3.802; P < 0.001). In a subgroup of stage II-III CRC patients, c-MYC GCN gain was significantly associated with poor prognosis by univariate (P = 0.034) and multivariate (P = 0.040) analyses. c-MYC protein overexpression was observed in 201 (54.8%) out of 367 patients and weakly correlated with c-MYC GCN gain (ρ, 0.211). In cohort 2, the c-MYC genetic status was heterogenous in advanced CRC patients. Discordance between GCN gain in the primary tumor and either distant or lymph-node metastasis was 25.7% and 30.4%, respectively. A similar frequency for c-MYC GCN gain and amplification was observed in CRC patients with both wild-type and mutated KRAS. Conclusions: c-MYC GCN gain was an independent factor for poor prognosis in consecutive CRC patients and in the stage II-III subgroup. Our findings indicate that the status of c-MYC may be helpful in predicting the patients' outcome and for managing CRC patients.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to explore the clinical and prognostic influence of numeric alterations of MET gene copy number (GCN) and chromosome 7 (CEP7) CN in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. MET GCN and CEP7 CN were investigated in tissue arrayed tumors from 170 CRC patients using silver in situ hybridization (SISH). MET GCN gain was defined as ≥4 copies of MET, and CEP7 polysomy was prespecified as ≥3 copies of CEP7. Additionally, MET messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription was evaluated using mRNA ISH and compared with MET GCN. MET GCN gain was observed in 14.7 % (25/170), which correlated with advanced stage (P = 0.037), presence of distant metastasis (P = 0.006), and short overall survival (OS) (P = 0.009). In contrast, CEP7 polysomy was found in 6.5 % (11/170), which was related to tumor location in the left colon (P = 0.027) and poor OS (P = 0.029). MET GCN positively correlated with CEP7 CN (R = 0.659, P < 0.001) and mRNA transcription (R = 0.239, P = 0.002). Of note, MET GCN gain and CEP7 polysomy were also associated with poor OS (P = 0.016 and P < 0.001, respectively) in stage II/III CRC patients (n = 123). In multivariate analysis, CEP7 polysomy was an independent prognostic factor for poor OS in all patients (P = 0.009; hazard ratio [HR], 2.220; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.233-3.997) and in stage II/III CRC patients (P < 0.001; HR, 20.781; 95 % CI, 4.600-93.882). MET GCN gain and CEP7 polysomy could predict a poor outcome in CRC patients, especially CEP7 polysomy has the most powerful prognostic impact in stage II/III CRC patients.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Tumor Biology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of T1/T2-weighted imaging (T1/T2WI) registration to reduce the postbiopsy hemorrhage effect for prostate cancer localization on prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Twenty-one men with pathology-proven prostate cancer who underwent preoperative MRI in a single institution were selected. The zonal anatomy was divided into 16 sections. T2WI, T1/T2-weighted registered imaging (T1/T2RI), T2WI combined with diffusion-weighted imaging (T2WI + DWI), and T1/T2RI combined with DWI (T1/T2RI + DWI) were scored for the likelihood of cancer by two radiology faculty members and two trainees, and were compared with histology results. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUCs) were used to assess diagnostic accuracy. Results: For the trainees (Reader 3 and Reader 4), the AUC values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) for T1/T2RI (0.60 and 0.62, respectively) than for T2WI (0.54 and 0.56, respectively) in tumor detection, whereas no significant difference was observed for faculty members. There was no significant difference in AUC values between T1/T2RI and T2WI + DWI for all readers except for Reader 1. There was no additional diagnostic benefit for adding DWI with T1/T2RI for all readers. Conclusions: T1/T2WI registration is a feasible technique. For less experienced readers, T1/T2RI is better than T2WI in localization of prostate cancer.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: There is little data about the clinical value of core length for prostate biopsy (PBx). We investigated the clinical values of various clinicopathological biopsy-related parameters, including core length, in the contemporary multi-core PBx. Patients and methods: Medical records of 5,243 consecutive patients who received PBx at our institution were reviewed. Among them, 3,479 patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml level who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multi (≥ 12)-core PBx at our institution were analyzed for prostate cancer (PCa). Gleason score upgrading (GSU) was analyzed in 339 patients who were diagnosed with low-risk PCa and received radical prostatectomy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses for PCa detection and prediction of GSU were performed. Results: The mean age and PSA of the entire cohort were 63.5 years and 5.4 ng/ml, respectively. The overall cancer detection rate was 28.5%. There was no statistical difference in core length between patients diagnosed with PCa and those without PCa (16.1 ± 1.8 vs 16.1 ± 1.9 mm, P = 0.945). The core length was also not significantly different (16.4 ± 1.7 vs 16.4 ± 1.6mm, P = 0.889) between the GSU group and non-GSU group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the core length of PBx did not affect PCa detection in TRUS-guided multi-core PBx (P = 0.923) and was not prognostic for GSU in patients with low-risk PCa (P = 0.356). Conclusions: In patients undergoing contemporary multi-core PBx, core length may not have significant impact on PCa detection and also GSU following radical prostatectomy among low-risk PCa group.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical and prognostic significance of HER3 expression and its relation to HER2 status in primary colorectal cancer (pCRC) were investigated. We retrospectively analysed 365 consecutive cases of pCRC that had been previously evaluated for HER2 status and included their 143 matched lymph node metastases. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to assess HER3 expression using tissue array methods. Of 364 eligible patients, HER3 overexpression was detected in 251 cases (69 %) (IHC 2+, n = 186 and IHC 3+, n = 65). HER3 overexpression was inversely correlated with histologic grade (p = 0.006), tumour size (p < 0.001), tumour depth (p < 0.001), TNM stage (p = 0.002), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.004), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.013) and distant metastasis (p = 0.039). Moreover, it positively correlated with both HER2 overexpression (p = 0.007) and HER2 gene amplification (p = 0.006). Although HER3 overexpression was associated with longer survival in univariate analysis (p = 0.026), it was not an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (p = 0.359). Moreover, co-alteration of HER3 and HER2 was associated with neither survival nor any clinicopathologic parameter except tumour location in the rectum. Although not an independent prognostic factor for overall survival, HER3 overexpression was associated with several favourable prognostic clinicopathologic parameters. Additionally, HER3 overexpression strongly correlated with HER2 positivity in this cohort of patients.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Archiv für Pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für Klinische Medicin
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    Sumi Yun · Jae Moon Koh · Kyu Sang Lee · An Na Seo · Kyung Han Nam · Gheeyoung Choe
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Meningiomas show high recurrence rates even after curative tumor removal. The invasiveness of meningiomas may contribute to their high recurrence rates. Recently, c-MET and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) have been reported to be involved in cancer invasion. Methods: We examined the immunohistochemical expression of c-MET and HGF in 100 cases of patients with meningiomas who have undergone complete tumor removal. Results: c-MET-High and HGFHigh were found in 17% and 13% of meningiomas, respectively. Brain invasion was observed in 17.6% of c-MET-High meningiomas, but in only 2.4% of c-MET-Low meningiomas (p=.033). Bone/soft tissue invasion was observed in 23.5% of c-MET-High meningiomas and in 9.6% of c-MET-Low meningiomas (p=.119). HGF-High did not show statistical association with brain invasion or bone/soft tissue invasion. c-MET-High demonstrated shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS, 93.5±8.2 months vs 96.1±1.9 months); however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=.139). There was no association of HGF-High with RFS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that c- MET-High is associated with brain invasion of meningiomas, and that c-MET expression may be a useful predictive marker for meningioma recurrence. Patients with invasive meningiomas with high expressions of c-MET may be good candidates for targeted therapy using c-MET inhibitors.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · European Journal of Cancer
  • K. Lee · Y. Kwak · G. Choe · W. Kim · D. Kim · S. Kang · H. Lee

    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · European Journal of Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Nucleic acid amplification tests on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens enable Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) detection and rapid tuberculosis diagnosis in the absence of microbiologic culture tests. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for detecting Mycobacterium species in FFPE tissues. Methods: We examined 110 FFPE specimens (56 nonmycobacterial cases, 32 MTB, and 22 nontuberculous mycobacteria [NTM] determined by acid-fast bacilli [AFB] culture) to assess five PCR methods: nested PCR (N-PCR) (Seeplex MTB Nested ACE Detection; Seegene, Seoul, South Korea), an in-house real-time PCR (RT-PCR) method, and three commercial RT-PCR methods (AccuPower MTB RT-PCR [Bioneer, Seoul, Korea], artus M tuberculosis TM PCR [Qiagen, Hilden, Germany], and AdvanSure tuberculosis/NTM RT-PCR [LG Life Sciences, Seoul, Korea]). Results: The results of N-PCR, in-house RT-PCR, and AdvanSure RT-PCR correlated well with AFB culture results (concordance rates, 94.3%, 87.5%, and 89.5%, respectively). The sensitivity of N-PCR (87.5%) was higher than that of the RT-PCR methods, although these differences were not statistically significant between N-PCR and the in-house and AdvanSure RT-PCR methods (68.8% and 80.0%, respectively). All the PCR methods had high specificities, ranging from 98.2% to 100%. Only two NTM cases were detected by AdvanSure RT-PCR, implying a very low sensitivity. Conclusions: Well-designed RT-PCR and N-PCR can effectively identify MTB in FFPE specimens.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · American Journal of Clinical Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Background Active surveillance (AS) is a promising option for patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa), however current criteria could not select the patients correctly, many patients who fulfilled recent AS criteria experienced pathological Gleason score upgrade (PGU) after radical prostatectomy (RP). In this study, we aimed to develop an accurate model for predicting PGU among low-risk PCa patients by using exome genotyping. Methods We genotyped 242,221 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)s on a custom HumanExome BeadChip v1.0 (Illuminam Inc.) in blood DNA from 257 low risk PCa patients (PSA <10 ng/ml, biopsy Gleason score (GS) ≤6 and clinical stage ≤T2a) who underwent radical prostatectomy. Genetic data were analyzed using an unconditional logistic regression to calculate an odds ratio as an estimate of relative risk of PGU, which defined pathologic GS above 7. Among them, we selected persistent SNPs after multiple testing using FDR method, and we compared accuracies from the multivariate logistic model incorporating clinical factors between included and excluded selected SNP information. Results After analysis of exome genotyping, 15 SNPs were significant to predict PGU in low risk PCa patients. Among them, one SNP – rs33999879 remained significant after multiple testing. When a multivariate model incorporating factors in Epstein definition – PSA density, biopsy GS, positive core number, tumor per core ratio and age was devised for the prediction of PGU, the predictive accuracy of the multivariate model was 78.4% (95%CI: 0.726–0.834). By addition the factor of rs33999879 in aforementioned multivariate model, the predictive accuracy was 82.9%, which was significantly increased (p = 0.0196). Conclusion The rs33999879 SNP is a predictor for PGU. The addition of genetic information from the exome sequencing effectively enhanced the predictive accuracy of the multivariate model to establish suitable active surveillance criteria.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at determining the incidence and clinical implications of HER2 status in primary colorectal cancer (CRC). HER2 status was investigated in two retrospective cohorts of 365 consecutive CRC patients (cohort 1) and 174 advanced CRC patients with synchronous or metachronous distant metastasis (cohort 2). HER2 status was determined by performing dual-color silver in-situ hybridization (SISH), mRNA in-situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The incidence of HER2 protein overexpression (IHC 2+/3+) was approximately 6% (22 of 365 in cohort 1; 10 of 174 in cohort 2). HER2 gene amplification was observed in 5.8% of the patients from cohort 1 and 6.3% of the patients from cohort 2. HER2 gene amplification was more frequently observed in CRCs located in the rectum than in the right and left colon (P = 0.013 in cohort 1; P = 0.009 in cohort 2). HER2 status, determined by IHC, ISH, and dual-color SISH, was not significantly associated with aggressive CRC behaviour or patients' prognosis in both the cohorts. Of the combined cohort with a total of 539 cases, the concordance rate was 95.5% between dual-color SISH and IHC detection methods. On excluding equivocally immunostained cases (IHC 2+), the concordance rate was 97.7%. HER2 mRNA overtranscription, detected by ISH, significantly correlated with protein overexpression and gene amplification (P<0.001). HER2 gene amplification was identified in a minority of CRC patients with high concordance rates between dual-color SISH and IHC detection methods. Although HER2 status did not predict patients' prognosis, our findings may serve as a basis for future studies on patient selection for HER2 targeted therapy.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the time-course of aging on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of colon. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of morphology, ICC and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactive cells in the aged rat. The proximal colon of 344 Fischer rats at four different ages (6, 31, 74 weeks, and 2 years) were studied. The immunoreactivity of c-Kit, nNOS, anti-protein gene product 9.5(PGP 9.5) and synaptophysin were counted after immunohistochemistry. The c-kit, SCF (stem cell factor; ligand of Kit) and nNOS mRNA were measured by real-time PCR. c-Kit and nNOS protein were assessed by Western blot. Isovolumetric contractile force measurement and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were conducted. The area of intramuscular fat deposition significantly increased with age after 31 weeks. c-Kit immunoreactive ICC and nNOS immunoreactive neurons and nerve fibers significantly declined with age. mRNA and protein expression of c-kit and nNOS decreased with aging. The functional study showed that the spontaneous contractility was decreased in aged rat, whereas EFS responses in the presence of atropine and L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester were increased in aged rat. In conclusion, the decrease of proportion of proper smooth muscle, the density of ICC and nNOS immunoreactive neuronal fibers and the number of nNOS immunoreactive neurons during the aging process may explain the aging-associated colonic dysmotility.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
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    ABSTRACT: Synovial osteochondromatosis is a rare, benign condition characterized by formation of cartilaginous nodules within the synovium. It rarely occurs at cervical spine, and only six cases have been previously reported in the English literature. We describe another case of synovial osteochondromatosis in the cervical spine in a 77-year-old man who presented with compressive myelopathy. Here we briefly review the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis based on CT and MR findings.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
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    Kyung Han Nam · Min A Kim · Gheeyoung Choe · Woo Ho Kim · Hye Seung Lee
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the roles of Lethal giant larvae 2 (Lgl2), an epithelial cell polarity protein, during gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) progression and evaluated the correlation of Lgl2 with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers. Lgl2 protein and mRNA expression were determined by immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization in a large series of GC and preneoplastic lesions. Additionally, expression of 7 EMT markers was examined by immunohistochemistry. Loss of membrane Lgl2 staining in GC was observed in 347 of 409 GCs. Lgl2 loss was associated with diffuse histological type (P < 0.001), advanced stage (P = 0.021), and worse prognosis (P = 0.047). Furthermore, Lgl2 loss correlated with reduced E-cadherin expression (P < 0.01) and increased expression of vimentin (P < 0.01). Combined analysis of Lgl2 and the EMT markers, S100A4 and MMP2, improved predictions of patient outcomes. During gastric carcinogenesis, membrane expression of Lgl2 was progressively lost in 4 % of normal mucosa, 75 % of intestinal metaplasia, 58 % of gastric dysplasia, 69 % of intestinal type GC, and 96 % of diffuse type GC. Our results suggest that Lgl2 loss occurs at an early stage of gastric carcinogenesis and contributes to GC progression.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Gastric Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Glioblastomas may develop de novo (primary glioblastomas, P-GBLs) or through progression from lower-grade astrocytomas (secondary glioblastomas, S-GBLs). The aim of this study was to compare the immunohistochemical classification of glioblastomas with clinically determined P-GBLs and S-GBLs to identify the best combination of antibodies for immunohistochemical classification. We evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53, and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH-1) in 150 glioblastoma cases. According to clinical history, the glioblastomas analyzed in this study consisted of 146 P-GBLs and 4 S-GBLs. Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR, p53, and IDH-1 was observed in 62.6%, 49.3%, and 11.1%, respectively. Immunohistochemical profiles of EGFR(+)/p53(-), IDH-1(-)/EGFR(+)/p53(-), and EGFR(-)/p53(+) were noted in 41.3%, 40.2%, and 28.7%, respectively. Expression of IDH-1 and EGFR(-)/p53(+) was positively correlated with young age. The typical immunohistochemical features of S-GBLs comprised IDH-1(+)/EGFR(-)/p53(+), and were noted in 3.6% of clinically P-GBLs. The combination of IDH-1(-) or EGFR(+) was the best set of immunohistochemical stains for identifying P-GBLs, whereas the combination of IDH-1(+) and EGFR(-) was best for identifying S-GBLs. We recommend a combination of IDH-1 and EGFR for immunohistochemical classification of glioblastomas. We expect our results to be useful for determining treatment strategies for glioblastoma patients.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · The Korean Journal of Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare and aggressive form of chondrosarcoma. The extraskeletal intraspinal type is even rare among the mesenchymal chondrosarcoma cases. We presented a case of a 17-year-old boy pathologically diagnosed with intraspinal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. MRI showed multiple intradural extramedullary masses with contrast enhancement, without the evidence of brain lesion. On F-FDG PET/CT, hypermetabolism was observed in the lesions matched with enhancement on spine MRI. The lesions were well differentiated from spinal cord. In the case of hypermetabolic lesion in intradural and extramedullary lesion of the spinal cord, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma should be considered for the differential diagnosis.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Clinical nuclear medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Protrusion of the median lobe (PML) is thought to add technical difficulty during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Thus, we quantified PML using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated its impact on base surgical margin (BSM) status during RALP. The clinical data of consecutive patients who underwent RALP were retrieved from a prospectively registered database. Of the 655 eligible men, 9 patients were excluded because they did not undergo MRI. PML was measured in a T2-weighted mid-sagittal scan. We performed univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. The mean PML was 8.3 ± 3.6 mm. The rate of positive surgical margins was 17.3 % (73/423) in pathologic stage T2 and 34.6 % (226/646) in all cases. The BSMs were positive in 10.1 % (66/646) of cases. A logistic regression analysis revealed that PML was significantly correlated with BSM positivity in all cases (odds ratio [OR] 1.080, p = 0.026). In particular, they had a stronger correlation with pathologic stage T3 or higher (OR 1.1143, p = 0.004). PML was an independent predictor of BSM positivity (OR 1.113, p = 0.046) in pathologic stage T3 or higher, as were preoperative prostate-specific antigen, prostate size, and pathologic stage. Cases with 10 mm or higher PML had significantly more BSM positivity than cases with <10 mm PML (35.9 vs. 20.1 %, p = 0.012). Protrusion of the median lobe measured using preoperative MRI was significantly correlated with positive BSMs during RALP. Surgeons should pay more attention to patients with 10 mm or higher PML and advanced stages.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · World Journal of Urology
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to find out predictive markers for lymph node (LN) metastasis of early gastric carcinoma (EGC) by separating evaluation of protein expression in mucosa and submucosa considering tumor heterogeneity. We selected 37 pN1-3 EGCs and depth- and size-matched 31 pN0 EGCs as training set and 72 EGCs including 14 pN1-3 EGCs as test set. Protein expression for β-catenin, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, galectin-3, c-MET, TrkB, and Ki-67 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in mucosal (-m) and submucosal (-sm) portions of tumor. In the training set, Ki67-m was higher than in Ki67-sm (mean ± SD: 82.67 ± 11.99% vs 61.79 ± 22.53%, p < 0.001). Altered E-cadherin-sm, high Ki67-m, and high Ki67-sm were correlated with LN metastasis (p < 0.05) and Ki67-sm was independent with lymphatic invasion and desmoplasia (p = 0.015 by multivariate logistic analysis). The test set confirmed Ki67-sm and E-cadherin-sm as predictors of LN metastasis (p < 0.05). Submucosal EGCs with ≥2 predictive factors out of high Ki67-sm, altered E-cadherin-sm, large tumor size (≥3 cm), diffuse type histology, and present lymphatic invasion yielded 100% sensitivity and 90.9% specificity for prediction of LN metastasis in 21 submucosal EGCs of test set. The proliferative activity of tumor in submucosa is suggested to be an independent predictor for LN metastasis in EGC.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Apmis
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    ABSTRACT: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a rare disease among Asians. Arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, which accompanies GCA, has not yet been reported in Koreans. Diagnosis of GCA is difficult if typical symptoms other than visual loss are absent. Here, we report a case of an 83-year-old Korean woman presenting with sudden visual loss in both eyes (oculus uterque, OU). Her visual acuities included perception of light in the right eye (oculus dexter, OD) and perception of hand motion in the left eye (oculus sinister, OS). The results of the Hardy-Rand-Rittler test and Ishihara test showed total dyschromatopsia OU. The Goldmann perimetry test revealed a total field defect OD and paracentral island OS. Fundus examination revealed chalky-white disc swelling OU. Other systemic symptoms and signs were unremarkable. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and platelet count were highly elevated. Temporal artery biopsy revealed multiple lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells in the arterial media layer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GCA in a Korean that has been confirmed with temporal artery biopsy. In conclusion, silent GCA can occur in Koreans, and hence, elderly patients presenting with chalky-white disc swelling, and corresponding laboratory findings must be evaluated for GCA.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Korean Journal of Ophthalmology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted endogenous insulin sensitizer, appears to play an important role in progression of several malignancies. Expression of adiponectin receptors--AdipoR1 and AdipoR2--has been documented in gastric cancer (GC) cell lines, but its role in GCs is still controversial. We investigated expression level of 2 adiponectin receptors and correlated their expression with prognosis in GC patients. Methods: We immunohistochemically evaluated AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression in 59 non-neoplastic gastric mucosas, 48 gastric adenomas, 250 GCs, and 58 lymph nodes involved by metastatic GC and assessed its association with clinicopathologic characteristics. Results: Expression rates of both receptors increased stepwise in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa, gastric adenoma, intestinal-type GC, and metastatic GC (p < 0.001). AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression was observed in 85 (34.0 %) and 118 (47.2 %) GC cases, respectively. Expression rates were higher in intestinal-type GC than in diffuse-type GC (p < 0.001 and 0.016, respectively). AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 expression was more frequent in advanced GC than in early GC (p < 0.001, each) and was associated with lymphatic invasion (p = 0.046 and 0.001, respectively). AdipoR2 expression was associated with poor overall and disease-free survival (p = 0.001 and 0.007, respectively). AdipoR1 expression was associated with poor disease-free survival for intestinal-type GC patients (p = 0.046). In multivariate analysis, AdipoR2 was an independent prognostic factor for intestinal-type GC (p = 0.017). Conclusions: Adiponectin receptor expression is related to GC development and progression, especially intestinal-type GC. Thus, adiponectin receptor expression can serve as a prognostic marker in GC patients.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Intestinal metaplasia (IM) is a premalignant condition. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between endoscopic and histological findings of IM. The cases of IM were graded by conventional endoscopy, and biopsies were taken from the antrum and body of 1,333 subjects for histological IM diagnosis. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify the factors that affect the sensitivity of endoscopic IM diagnosis. The sensitivity/specificity of endoscopic IM diagnosis based on histology was 24.0%/91.9% for the antrum and 24.2%/88.0% for the body. As indicated by multivariate analysis, the presence of endoscopic atrophic gastritis (AG) (odds ratio [OR], 4.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.07 to 10.79) and the activity of mucosal inflammation (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.08 to 4.54) were associated with the sensitivity of endoscopic IM diagnosis in the antrum, while the presence of endoscopic AG (OR, 8.02; 95% CI, 4.55 to 14.15), dysplasia (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.07 to 5.39), and benign gastric ulcers (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.081) were associated with the sensitivity of endoscopic IM diagnosis in the body. As the sensitivity of endoscopic IM diagnosis was low, a high index of suspicion for IM is necessary in the presence of atrophy, and confirmation by histology is also necessary.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Gut and liver

Publication Stats

3k Citations
484.38 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2015
    • Seoul National University Bundang Hospital
      • Department of Pathology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1997-2015
    • Seoul National University
      • Department of Pathology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1998-2012
    • Seoul National University Hospital
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Department of Neurosurgery
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2002
    • Hanyang University
      • Major in Internal Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea