Debra L Friedman

Vanderbilt University, Нашвилл, Michigan, United States

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Publications (137)789.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Survivors of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) are recognized to be at increased risk for delayed adverse health outcomes related to radiation therapy (RT). However, the necessary latency required to observe these late effects means that the estimated risks apply to out-dated treatments. We sought to compare the normal tissue dose received by children treated for HL and enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) (diagnosed 1970-1986) with patients treated on recent Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials (enrolled 2002-2012).
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
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    ABSTRACT: Fatigue is a significant problem for adolescent and young adult (AYA) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. The relationship between exercise and fatigue is complex. This study explored the trajectory of and the relationship between exercise and fatigue over 36 months post-therapy in a cohort of 103 AYA-aged HL survivors treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) study AHOD0031. Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations were used in this secondary data analysis. Exercise and fatigue improved over time but were unrelated; amount of exercise at end of therapy predicted amount of exercise at 12 (p = 0.02) and 36 (p = 0.0008) months post-therapy.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk for subsequent neoplasms (SNs), but the incidence beyond the age of 40 years and associations with therapeutic exposures have not been well described. Among 14,364 survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed between 1970 and 1986, 3,171 had an attained age of 40 years or older at the time of last contact. Cumulative incidence of SNs, standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), excess absolute risk of subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs), and relative risks (RRs) for SMNs and nonmelanoma skin cancers were calculated. In total, 679 SNs were diagnosed in patients age 40 years or older. These included 196 SMNs, 419 nonmelanoma skin cancers, 21 nonmalignant meningiomas, and 43 other benign neoplasms. At age 55 years, the cumulative incidence of new SNs and SMNs occurring after age 40 years was 34.6% (95% CI, 28.7 to 40.6) and 16.3% (95% CI, 11.7 to 20.9), respectively. Survivors were twice as likely as the general population to receive a diagnosis of SMN after age 40 years (SIR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.9 to 2.5). Among SMNs, risk was increased for breast cancer (SIR, 5.5; 95% CI, 4.5 to 6.7), renal cancer (SIR, 3.9; 95% CI, 2.0 to 7.5), soft tissue sarcoma (SIR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.5 to 4.4), and thyroid cancer (SIR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.5). Female sex (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.6; P < .001) and therapeutic radiation exposure (RR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4 to 3.3; P < .001) were associated with an increased for risk for SMN in multivariable analysis. Even after age 40 years, survivors of childhood cancer remain at increased risk for treatment-related SNs. These data suggest the need for life-long monitoring and should inform anticipatory guidance provided to survivors of childhood cancer. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for treatment-related adverse health outcomes, known as late effects. Through matched and longitudinal cohorts, we assessed the impact of survivorship care on patient and parent knowledge of treatment history and associated health risks. Childhood cancer survivors were recruited from a single-institution survivorship clinic and matched with survivors receiving routine follow-up care (controls) on diagnosis, age, and time off therapy. One hundred seventy-four participants completed telephone interviews assessing knowledge of diagnosis, treatment history, and risk of late effects. Additionally, 48 new survivorship patients were followed longitudinally with serial interviews for 18 months. In the case-control study, survivorship participants were more likely than controls to correctly report their diagnosis (98% vs. 90%, P = 0.039) and indicate a previous discussion of risk of late effects (99% vs. 62%, P < 0.0001). Compared to controls, survivorship participants were 13% more sensitive reporting chemotherapeutics (95%CI 2.8-23.7%, P = 0.013) and 12% more sensitive reporting late effect risk (95%CI 7.3-16.6%, P < 0.0001). In the longitudinal cohort, participants were 7% more sensitive reporting chemotherapeutics (95%CI 5.4-10.8%, P < 0.001) and 9% more sensitive reporting late effect risk (95%CI 5.6-23.8%, P < 0.001) at 3 months compared to baseline. In regression analysis, baseline knowledge correlated with subsequent interview performance, and time since survivorship visit correlated with decreased knowledge of late effects, but not diagnosis or treatment history. Survivorship care was associated with increased knowledge of diagnosis, treatment history, and risk of late effects in both cohorts. Knowledge of late effects decreases with time, suggesting the need for additional educational strategies. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Pediatric Blood & Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in children. We report 3 patients who presented to their general pediatricians and pediatric oncologists with ocular complaints as the only evidence of their leukemic relapses. All patients presented with persistent conjunctival injection and were referred to an ophthalmologist for further management. Two patients were diagnosed with recurrent anterior uveitis, which after extensive workup and treatment with topical glucocorticoids was found to be a result of leukemic ocular disease. One patient had a conjunctival tumor, which was biopsied and confirmed to be leukemic infiltration. All children eventually succumbed to their recurrent disease. These cases demonstrate the need for a high index of suspicion when evaluating ocular symptoms in patients with a prior history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Anterior chamber paracentesis and biopsy of suspicious lesions should be considered as possible diagnostic procedures in addition to standard hematologic studies. Collaboration between a primary care physician, pediatric oncologist, and ophthalmologist is essential for optimal diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of AAPOS: the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
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    ABSTRACT: Family history of lymphoid neoplasm (LN) is a strong and consistently observed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) risk factor, although it has been only marginally examined in pediatric/adolescent patients. Here, healthy control children identified by random digit dialing were matched on sex, race/ethnicity and age to HL cases diagnosed at 0-14 years at Children's Oncology Group institutions in 1989-2003. Detailed histories were captured by structured telephone interviews with parents of 517 cases and 783 controls. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) RNA detection was performed for 355 available case tumors. Two analytic strategies were applied to estimate associations between family cancer history and pediatric/adolescent HL. In a standard case-control approach, multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In a reconstructed cohort approach, each relative was included as a separate observation, and multivariate proportional hazards regression was used to produce hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Using the latter, pediatric/adolescent HL was associated with a positive family history (HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.06-1.36), particularly early-onset cancers (HR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.06-1.59) and those in the paternal lineage (HR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.16-1.65), with a suggested association for LN in first-degree relatives (HR = 3.61, 95% CI: 0.87-15.01). There were no discernable patterns for EBV+ versus EBV- HL. The clustering of LN within pedigrees may signal shared genetic susceptibility or common environmental exposures. Heritable genetic risk variants have only recently begun to be discovered, however. These results are consistent with other studies and provide a compelling rationale for family-based studies to garner information about genetic susceptibility to HL.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · International Journal of Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: A phase 3 trial assessing response-based therapy in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma mandated real-time central review of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) and imaging records by a centralized review center to maximize protocol compliance. We report the impact of centralized radiation therapy review on protocol compliance. Review of simulation films, port films, and dosimetry records was required before and after treatment. Records were reviewed by study-affiliated or review center-affiliated radiation oncologists. A deviation of 6% to 10% from protocol-specified dose was scored as "minor"; a deviation of >10% was "major." A volume deviation was scored as "minor" if margins were less than specified or "major" if fields transected disease-bearing areas. Interventional review and final compliance review scores were assigned to each radiation therapy case and compared. Of 1712 patients enrolled, 1173 underwent IFRT at 256 institutions in 7 countries. An interventional review was performed in 88% of patients and a final review in 98%. Overall, minor and major deviations were found in 12% and 6% of patients, respectively. Among the cases for which ≥1 pre-IFRT modification was requested by the Quality Assurance Review Center and subsequently made by the treating institution, 100% were made compliant on final review. By contrast, among the cases for which ≥1 modification was requested but not made by the treating institution, 10% were deemed compliant on final review. In a large trial with complex treatment pathways and heterogeneous radiation therapy fields, central review was performed in a large percentage of cases before IFRT and identified frequent potential deviations in a timely manner. When suggested modifications were performed by the institutions, deviations were almost eliminated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
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    ABSTRACT: Ipilimumab, a novel immune checkpoint inhibitor, is associated with long-term survival in ~20% of advanced melanoma patients and is also being evaluated in the adjuvant setting. With this growing cohort of survivors, long-term health outcomes, chronic toxicities, and functional outcomes among survivors treated with ipilimumab need to be defined. Using retrospective medical record abstraction, we evaluated disease status, chronic immune and non-immune related health events, pharmacologic management of symptoms, and functional status in melanoma patients with overall survival ≥2 years following ipilimumab treatment at Vanderbilt University. Ninety patients received ipilimumab for metastatic disease or as adjuvant therapy between January 2006 and September 2012 and 33 patients survived ≥2 years with a median overall survival of 60.1 months. Of these, 24 patients were alive at last follow-up (73%) with 14 patients free of disease (42%). Gastrointestinal and dermatologic adverse events were frequent but largely transient. By contrast, patients with hypophysitis universally required ongoing corticosteroids although largely remained asymptomatic with appropriate hormone replacement. Surviving patients generally had excellent performance status (ECOG 0-1 in 23/24). Chronic neurologic toxicities caused substantial morbidity and mortality in two patients who received whole brain radiotherapy >5 years prior to analysis, and in one patient with chronic, painful peripheral neuropathy. No previously undescribed cardiac, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, hematologic, or neoplastic safety signals were identified. In conclusion, ipilimumab was associated with largely excellent functional outcomes and among long-term survivors. Chronic endocrine dysfunction and occasional neurologic toxicity (primarily associated with whole brain radiation) were observed in a small number of patients. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the feasibility of a legacy-making intervention in children with cancer and the preliminary effects on outcomes related to quality of life. Children (N = 28) ages 7-17 years completed a baseline QOL questionnaire (PedsQL) at T1. After baseline, the intervention group (n = 15) completed a randomized intervention that guided children to answer questions about legacy-making and create a digital story about themselves. A final copy of the digital story was provided to the families. A control group (n = 13) received customary care. Children repeated the questionnaire at T2. Parents (N = 22) of children who completed the intervention completed follow-up survey questions regarding intervention effects. Feasibility was strong (78% participation; 1 attrition). While differences between the groups in physical, emotional, social, or school functioning change was not statistically significant, the intervention group showed slightly better emotional and school functioning compared to controls. Parents reported that their child's digital story provided emotional comfort to them (n = 11, 46%), facilitated communication between parents and children (n = 9, 38%), and was a coping strategy for them (n = 4, 17%). Parents reported that the intervention helped children express their feelings (n = 19, 79%), cope (n = 6, 27%), and feel better emotionally (n = 5, 23%). Our intervention is feasible for children with cancer, is developmentally appropriate for children 7-17 years of age, and demonstrates promise to improve quality of life outcomes for children with cancer and their parents. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014;9999:1-8 © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Pediatric Blood & Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: The study was designed to determine whether response-based therapy improves outcomes in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. We examined patterns of first relapse in the study. From September 2002 to July 2010, 1712 patients <22 years old with stage I-IIA with bulk, I-IIAE, I-IIB, and IIIA-IVA with or without doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide were enrolled. Patients were categorized as rapid (RER) or slow early responders (SER) after 2 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC). The SER patients were randomized to 2 additional ABVE-PC cycles or augmented chemotherapy with 21 Gy involved field radiation therapy (IFRT). RER patients were stipulated to undergo 2 additional ABVE-PC cycles and were then randomized to 21 Gy IFRT or no further treatment if complete response (CR) was achieved. RER without CR patients were non-randomly assigned to 21 Gy IFRT. Relapses were characterized without respect to site (initial, new, or both; and initial bulk or initial nonbulk), and involved field radiation therapy field (in-field, out-of-field, or both). Patients were grouped by treatment assignment (SER; RER/no CR; RER/CR/IFRT; and RER/CR/no IFRT). Summary statistics were reported. At 4-year median follow-up, 244 patients had experienced relapse, 198 of whom were fully evaluable for review. Those who progressed during treatment (n=30) or lacked relapse imaging (n=16) were excluded. The median time to relapse was 12.8 months. Of the 198 evaluable patients, 30% were RER/no CR, 26% were SER, 26% were RER/CR/no IFRT, 16% were RER/CR/IFRT, and 2% remained uncategorized. The 74% and 75% relapses involved initially bulky and nonbulky sites, respectively. First relapses rarely occurred at exclusively new or out-of-field sites. By contrast, relapses usually occurred at nodal sites of initial bulky and nonbulky disease. Although response-based therapy has helped define treatment for selected RER patients, it has not improved outcome for SER patients or facilitated refinement of IFRT volumes or doses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
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    ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocia I consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effective screening and assessment can help providers deliver necessary and comprehensive survivorship care.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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    ABSTRACT: Background: There has been little improvement in the survival of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients aged 15 to 39 years relative to other age groups, raising the question of whether such patients receive appropriate initial treatment. Methods: We examined receipt of initial cancer treatment for a population-based sample of 504 AYAs diagnosed in 2007-2008 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, germ cell cancer, or sarcoma. Registry data, patient surveys, and detailed medical record reviews were used to evaluate the association of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and health care setting characteristics with receipt of appropriate initial treatment, which was defined by clinical specialists in AYA oncology based on adult guidelines and published literature available before 2009 and analyzed with multivariable logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Approximately 75% of AYA cancer patients in our sample received appropriate treatment, 68% after excluding stage I male germ cell patients who all received appropriate treatment. After this exclusion, appropriate treatment ranged from 79% of sarcoma patients to 56% of ALL patients. Cancer type (P < .01) and clinical trial participation (P = .04) were statistically significantly associated with appropriate treatment in multivariable analyses. Patients enrolled in clinical trials were more likely to receive appropriate therapy relative to those not enrolled (78% vs 67%, adjusted odds ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.1 to 6.4). Conclusions: Except for those with early stage male germ cell tumors, approximately 30% (or 3 in 10) AYA cancer patients did not receive appropriate therapy. Further investigation is required to understand the reasons for this potential shortfall in care delivery.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2014 · JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute
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    ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effective screening and assessment can help providers deliver necessary and comprehensive survivorship care.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: The Children's Oncology Group study AHOD0031, a randomized phase III study, was designed to evaluate the role of early chemotherapy response in tailoring subsequent therapy in pediatric intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. To avoid treatment-associated risks that compromise long-term health and to maintain high cure rates, dose-intensive chemotherapy with limited cumulative doses was used. Patients and methods: Patients received two cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone (ABVE-PC) followed by response evaluation. Rapid early responders (RERs) received two additional ABVE-PC cycles, followed by complete response (CR) evaluation. RERs with CR were randomly assigned to involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT) or no additional therapy; RERs with less than CR were nonrandomly assigned to IFRT. Slow early responders (SERs) were randomly assigned to receive two additional ABVE-PC cycles with or without two cycles of dexamethasone, etoposide, cisplatin, and cytarabine (DECA). All SERs were assigned to receive IFRT. Results: Among 1,712 eligible patients, 4-year event-free survival (EFS) was 85.0%: 86.9% for RERs and 77.4% for SERs (P < .001). Four-year overall survival was 97.8%: 98.5% for RERs and 95.3% for SERs (P < .001). Four-year EFS was 87.9% versus 84.3% (P = .11) for RERs with CR who were randomly assigned to IFRT versus no IFRT, and 86.7% versus 87.3% (P = .87) for RERs with positron emission tomography (PET) -negative results at response assessment. Four-year EFS was 79.3% versus 75.2% (P = .11) for SERs who were randomly assigned to DECA versus no DECA, and 70.7% versus 54.6% (P = .05) for SERs with PET-positive results at response assessment. Conclusion: This trial demonstrated that early response assessment supported therapeutic titration (omitting radiotherapy in RERs with CR; augmenting chemotherapy in SERs with PET-positive disease). Strategies directed toward improved response assessment and risk stratification may enhance tailoring of treatment to patient characteristics and response.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Background Pediatric oncology patients are at increased risk for blood stream infections (BSI). Risk in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] ≥500/µl) is not well defined.ProcedureIn a retrospective cohort of febrile (temperature ≥38.0° for >1 hr or ≥38.3°) pediatric oncology patients with ANC ≥500/µl, a diagnostic prediction model for BSI was constructed using logistic regression modeling and the following candidate predictors: age, ANC, absolute monocyte count, body temperature, inpatient/outpatient presentation, sex, central venous catheter type, hypotension, chills, cancer diagnosis, stem cell transplant, upper respiratory symptoms, and exposure to cytarabine, anti-thymocyte globulin, or anti-GD2 antibody. The model was internally validated with bootstrapping methods.ResultsAmong 932 febrile episodes in 463 patients, we identified 91 cases of BSI. Independently significant predictors for BSI were higher body temperature (Odds ratio [OR] 2.36 P < 0.001), tunneled external catheter (OR 13.79 P < 0.001), peripherally inserted central catheter (OR 3.95 P = 0.005), elevated ANC (OR 1.19 P = 0.024), chills (OR 2.09 P = 0.031), and hypotension (OR 3.08 P = 0.004). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosis (OR 0.34 P = 0.026), increased age (OR 0.70 P = 0.049), and drug exposure (OR 0.08 P < 0.001) were associated with decreased risk for BSI. The risk prediction model had a C-index of 0.898; after bootstrapping adjustment for optimism, corrected C-index 0.885.Conclusions We developed a diagnostic prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia. External validation is warranted before use in clinical practice. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014;9999:1–7© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Pediatric Blood & Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor's body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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    ABSTRACT: Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor's body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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    ABSTRACT: Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, with attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding physical activity in survivors, including assessment for the risk of exercise-induced adverse events, exercise prescriptions, guidance for resistance training, and considerations for specific populations (eg, survivors with lymphedema, ostomies, peripheral neuropathy). In addition, strategies to encourage health behavioral change in survivors are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for patients with ALL undergoing maintenance therapy. Methods: Participants were aged 5 to 10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and poststudy testing addressed strength, flexibility, fitness, and motor function. Results: Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7 ± 7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements of 5% or more occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-Minute Walk Test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health|Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Pediatric Physical Therapy

Publication Stats

5k Citations
789.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009-2015
    • Vanderbilt University
      • • Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      Нашвилл, Michigan, United States
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • Department of Pediatrics
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2009-2014
    • Gateway-Vanderbilt Cancer Treatment Center
      Clarksville, Tennessee, United States
  • 2002-2009
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Division of Hematology
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1999-2009
    • The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2004-2008
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      • Division of Clinical Research
      Seattle, Washington, United States
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Department of Pediatric Oncology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • City of Hope National Medical Center
      • Department of Population Sciences
      Дуарте, California, United States
  • 1999-2008
    • Seattle Children's Hospital
      • • Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2005
    • Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • 2001
    • The Ohio State University
      Columbus, Ohio, United States