Jean-François Rossi

Université de Montpellier, Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

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Publications (46)290.62 Total impact

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    Jean-François Rossi
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    ABSTRACT: B-lymphocytes are programmed for the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) after antigen presentation, in the context of T-lymphocyte control within lymphoid organs. During this differentiation/activation process, B-lymphocytes exhibit different restricted or common surface markers, activation of cellular pathways that regulate cell cycle, metabolism, proteasome activity, and protein synthesis. All molecules involved in these different cellular mechanisms are potent therapeutic targets. Nowadays, due to the progress of the biology, more and more targeted drugs are identified, a situation that is correlated with an extended field of the targeted therapy. The full knowledge of the cellular machinery and cell-cell communication allows making the best choice to treat patients, in the context of personalized medicine. Also, focus should not be restricted to the immediate effects observed as clinical endpoints, that is, response rate, survival markers with conventional statistical methods, but it should consider the prediction of different clinical consequences due to other collateral drug targets, based on new methodologies. This means that new reflection and new bioclinical follow-up have to be monitored, particularly with the new drugs used with success in B-cell malignancies. This review discussed the principal aspects of such evident bioclinical progress.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Natural killer (NK) cells, a cytotoxic lymphocyte lineage, are able to kill tumor cells in vitro and in mouse models. However, whether these cells display an anti-tumor activity in cancer patients has not been demonstrated. Here we have addressed this issue in patients with several hematological cancers. We found a population of highly activated CD56dimCD16+ NK cells that have recently degranulated, evidence of killing activity, and it is absent in healthy donors. A high percentage of these cells expressed natural killer cell p46-related protein (NKp46), natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) and killer inhibitory receptors (KIRs) and a low percentage expressed NKG2A and CD94. They are also characterized by a high metabolic activity and active proliferation. Notably, we found that activated NK cells from hematological cancer patients have non-NK tumor cell antigens on their surface, evidence of trogocytosis during tumor cell killing. Finally, we found that these activated NK cells are distinguished by their CD45RA+RO+ phenotype, as opposed to non-activated cells in patients or in healthy donors displaying a CD45RA+RO− phenotype similar to naïve T cells. In summary, we show that CD45RA+RO+ cells, which resemble a unique NK population, have recognized tumor cells and degranulate in patients with hematological neoplasias.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · EBioMedicine
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    ABSTRACT: Manipulation of metabolic pathways in hematological cancers has therapeutic potential. Here, we determined the molecular mechanism of action of the metabolic modulator dichloroacetate (DCA) in leukemic cells. We found that DCA induces the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/p53 pathway with increased efficacy in tumors expressing wild type (wt p53). Clinically relevant, low concentrations of doxorubicin synergize in vitro and in vivo with DCA to further enhance p53 activation and to block tumor progression. Leukemia cell lines and primary leukemic cells containing mutant p53 are resistant to the above-described combination approach. However, DCA synergized with the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG to specifically eliminate these cells. Our studies strongly indicate that depending on the p53 status, different combination therapies would provide better treatment with decreased side effects in hematological cancers.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Oncotarget
  • Jean-François Rossi · Zhao-Yang Lu · Michel Jourdan · Bernard Klein
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    ABSTRACT: Human interleukin-6 (IL6) is a cytokine produced by many cell types, which has pleiotropic effects. In agreement, anti-IL6 therapy reduces inflammation, hepatic acute phase proteins, anemia and has anti-angiogenic effects. Blocking IL6 has demonstrated therapeutic efficacy with drug registration in Castleman's disease and inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis), without major toxicity. Interestingly, the inhibition of CRP production is a trusty surrogate marker of anti-IL6 therapy efficacy. Clinically registered IL6 inhibitors include siltuximab, an anti-IL6 monoclonal antibody (mab), and tocilizumab, an anti-IL6R mab. In cancer diseases, in particular plasma cell cancers, large randomized trials showed no efficacy of IL6 inhibitors, despite a full inhibition of CRP production in treated patients in vivo, the numerous data showing an involvement of IL6 in these diseases, and initial short-term treatments demonstrating a dramatic inhibition of cancer cell proliferation in vivo. A likely explanation is the plasticity of cancer cells, with the presence of various subclones, making it possible the outgrowth of cancer subclones using other growth factors than IL6. In addition, current therapeutic strategies used in these cancers already target IL6 activity. Thus, anti-IL6 therapeutics are able to neutralize IL6 production in vivo, are safe and useful in inflammatory and Castleman's disease. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Clinical Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: NK cell is an innate immune system lymphocyte lineage with natural cytotoxicity. Its optimal use in the clinic requires in vitro expansion and activation. Cytokines and encounter with target cells activate NK cells and induce proliferation, and this could depend on the presence of other immune cells. Here we activated PBMCs during 5 days with IL-2, with IL-2 plus the tumor cell line K562 and with the lymphoblastoid cell line R69 and perform integrated analyses of microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of purified NK cells. The samples cluster depending on the stimuli and not on the donor, indicating that the pattern of NK cell stimulation is acutely well conserved between individuals. mRNA expression is tighter regulated than miRNA expression. All stimuli induce a common preserved genetic remodeling. In addition, encounter with target cells mainly activates pathways related to metabolism. Different target cells induce different NK cell remodeling which affects cytokine response and cytotoxicity, supporting the notion that encounter with different target cells significantly changes the activation pattern. We validate our analysis by showing that activation down regulates miR-23a, which is a negative regulator of cathepsin C (CTSC) mRNA, a gene up regulated by all stimuli. The peptidase CTSC activates the granzymes, the main effector proteases involved in NK cell cytotoxicity. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which induces miR-23a expression, decreases CTSC expression and granzyme B activity leading to impaired NK cell cytotoxicity in an in vivo mouse model.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · The international journal of biochemistry & cell biology
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    ABSTRACT: Epstein-Barr virus reactivation (EBV-R) frequently occurs in patients having allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We evaluated the impact of controlled EBV-R on survival of 190 patients (114M/76F, median age: 51y, range 18-69), having HSCT for hematological malignancies (105 acute leukemias and myelodysplasias, 71 lymphoproliferative disorders, 14 others). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without EBV-R. 138 patients had reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Various stem cell sources (141 PB, 33 umbilical cord blood and 16 bone marrow) were used. Patients with EBV-R had longer PFS and OS than those without EBV-R: PFS at 2 years 69% vs 51% and at 5 years 47% vs 38% (P < .04); OS at 2 years 76% vs 64% and at 5 years 63% vs 47%) (P <.001). The use of rituximab had no impact on OS and PFS, but it reduced the intensity of GVHD, despite the fact that TRM was not significantly different between the two groups of patients. So, rituximab may have an additional effect to other factors on PFS and OS. In multivariate analysis, anti-thymocyte globulin administration was not a significant factor for PFS (P=0.68) and for OS (P=0.81). Circulating NK cells were significantly increased by 22% (P=.03) in EBV-R patients with no differences for other parameters. Controlled EBV-R in the setting of HSCT is associated with better OS and PFS, with a significant increase in circulating NK cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · European Journal Of Haematology
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    ABSTRACT: Although functionally competent cytotoxic T cells are frequently observed in malignant diseases, they possess little ability to react against tumor cells. This phenomenon is particularly apparent in multiple myeloma. We here demonstrate that cytotoxic T cells reacted against myeloma antigens when presented by autologous dendritic cells, but not by myeloma cells. We further show by gene-expression profiling and flow cytometry that, similar to many other malignant tumors, freshly isolated myeloma cells expressed several carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) at varying proportions. Binding and crosslinking of CEACAM-6 by cytotoxic T cells inhibited their activation and resulted in T cell unresponsiveness. Blocking of CEACAM-6 on the surface of myeloma cells by specific monoclonal antibodies or CEACAM-6 gene knock down by siRNA restored T cell reactivity against malignant plasma cells. These findings suggest that CEACAM-6 plays an important role in the regulation of CD8+ T cell responses against multiple myeloma. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of CEACAM-6 may be a promising strategy to improve myeloma immunotherapy.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple Myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignant plasma cell disorder. We have evaluated the counts of Multiple Myeloma Cells (MMCs) and normal plasma cells (N-PCs), seven days after high-dose melphalan (HDM) and autologous stem transplantation (ASCT). Two third of patients had detectable minimal residual disease (MRD+) (71.7 MMCs/µL) after induction treatment with dexamethasone and proteasome inhibitor. MMC counts were reduced by 92% (P ≤ .05) but not eradicated 7 days after HDM+ASCT. Post-HDM+ASCT MMCs were viable and bathed in a burst of MMC growth factors, linked with post-HDM aplasia. In one third of patients (MRD- patients), MMCs were not detectable after induction treatment and remained undetectable after HDM+ASCT. Major difference between MRD- and MRD+ patients is that N-PC counts were increased 3 fold (P〈.05) by HDM+ASCT in MRD- patients, but were unaffected in MRD+ patients. Possible explanation could be that clearance of MMCs in MRD- patients makes more niches available for N-PCs. Thus, MMCs are not fully eradicated shortly after HDM, are bathed in high concentrations of MMC growth factors in an almost desert BM, are viable in short-term culture, which suggests providing additional therapies shortly after HDM to kill resistant MMCs before full repair of lesions.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Oncotarget
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer cells have elevated aerobic glycolysis that is termed the Warburg effect. But several tumor cells, including leukemic cells, also increase glutamine metabolism, which is initiated by glutaminase (GLS). The microRNA (miRNA) miR-23 targets GLS mRNA and inhibits expression of GLS protein. Here we show that in human leukemic Jurkat cells the NF-κB p65 subunit binds to miR-23a promoter and inhibits miR-23a expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors release p65-induced inhibition. Jurkat cells growing in glutamine decrease proliferation due to cell accumulation in G0/G1 phase. Nevertheless, cells get used to this new source of energy by increasing GLS expression, which correlates with an increase in p65 expression and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to a higher basal NF-κB activity. Jurkat cells overexpressing p65 show increase basal GLS expression and proliferate faster than control cells in glutamine medium. Overexpressing miR-23a in leukemic cells impaired glutamine use and induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cell death. Therefore, p65 activation decreases miR-23a expression, which facilitates glutamine consumption allowing leukemic cells to use this alternative source of carbon and favoring their adaptation to the metabolic environment.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012 · The international journal of biochemistry & cell biology
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    ABSTRACT: Romiplostim, a thrombopoietic agent with demonstrated efficacy against immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in prospective controlled studies, was recently licensed for adults with chronic ITP. Only France has allowed romiplostim compassionate use since January 2008. ITP patients could receive romiplostim when they failed to respond to successive corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy, or when splenectomy was not indicated. We included the first 80 patients enrolled in this program with at least 2 years of follow-up. Primary platelet response (platelet count ≥ 50 × 10(9)/L and double baseline) was observed in 74% of all patients. Long-term responses (2 years) were observed in 47 (65%) patients, 37 (79%) had sustained platelet responses with a median platelet count of 106 × 10(9)/L (interquartile range, 75-167 × 10(9)/L), and 10 (21%) were still taking romiplostim, despite a median platelet count of 38 × 10(9)/L (interquartile range, 35-44 × 10(9)/L), but with clinical benefit (lower dose and/or fewer concomitant treatment(s) and/or diminished bleeding signs). A high bleeding score and use of concomitant ITP therapy were baseline factors predicting romiplostim failure. The most frequently reported adverse events were: arthralgias (26%), fatigue (13%), and nausea (7%). Our results confirmed that romiplostim use in clinical practice is effective and safe for severe chronic ITP. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01013181.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: Background / Purpose: In patients with relapsing multiple myeloma (MM), treatments with lenalinomid and dexamethasone provides a median overall survival of 36 months. As all patients will relapse, allotransplantation with adult donor stem cells may provide long-term disease control. Only a few cases of umbilical cord blood transplant (UCBT) have been reported in relapsing MM so far. We report here for the first time, the outcome of 17 consecutive patients with relapsing MM who underwent UCBT at a single institute between 2005 and 2009.Median age was 58 years [41–66]. All patients had relapsed before transplantation with a median of 2 relapses (range 1-4). They had all received bortezomib +/- thalidomide (7/17) +/- lenalidomid (5/17) as salvage therapy before transplant. Five patients were in complete remission (CR) before transplant, 4 in very good partial response (VGPR), 7 in partial response (PR) and 1 was in progression. 16 patients received two cord-bloods units and one patient received only one. All patients received reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, low dose total body irradiation +/- melphalan). Main conclusion: Neutrophil count ≥ 0.5 × 109/L for 5 consecutive days was achieved in 16/17 patients within a median of 10 days [6–35] and platelet count ≥ 50 × 109/L for five consecutive days in 12/17 patients within a median of 46 days [27–216]. T-cell chimerism (TCC) below 1% from the recipient was obtained in 16/17 patients. Among the 5 patients in CR before UCBT, 4 are still in CR and healthy (Performans status 0 or 1, only limited chronic GVH disease in 3/4 patients) at follow-up (month +17, +18, +31, +54). For 2 of these patients, the CR was confirmed by flow cytometry (≤1 tumor plasma cell per 5-10000 normal plasma cells in the bone marrow). The remaining patient in CR before transplantation relapsed at 41 months. Among the 12 patients that were not in CR at UCBT, 5 achieved the CR criteria at a median of 4 months after UCBT. The CR rate post-UCBT was 58%. This data is strongly in favour of a cord blood versus myeloma effect.Unfortunately, among the 5 patients whose response was upgraded to CR by UCBT, 1 underwent TRM and 4 relapsed at a median of 1 year post UCBT. In terms of risk of relapse for the 10 patients in CR post transplant, there is a statistically significant difference (Fisher Exact Test, p=0,048) in favor of patients already being in CR before transplant (relapse rate : 1/5) compared to patients who obtained CR after transplant (relapse rate : 4/4 taking into account that the 5th patient was not at risk because of early TRM).Overall, 53% of patients relapsed or had progressive disease. Post UCBT lenalidomid (alone or associated with dexamethasone) was unable to control disease evolution. 24% of patients died from relapse or progression. 29% of patients underwent TRM (within the first 6 months for the majority). TRM was mainly due to infections (2 bacterial septic shocks and 3 invasive fungal infections). With a median follow-up of 20 months, 47% of patients are alive. The one year overall survival was 58% and one year event free survival 41%. Median overall survival estimated by Kaplan-Meier method was 30 mo. [14–46] (95% CI) after D0 of UCBT. At follow-up, the performans status of survivors was PS=0 (4/8), PS=1 (2/8) and PS=2 (2/8).This study suggests that RIC regimen followed by UCBT is feasible in patients with relapsed MM with a TRM of 29% and a high CR rate (58%) suggestive of a cord blood versus myeloma effect. The best benefit from transplant was obtained for patients in CR before UCBT who undergo less relapses and obtain long term remissions together with limited GVH disease and a good performans status.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2011
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    Mounia Sabrina Braza · Bernard Klein · Geneviève Fiol · Jean-François Rossi
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are major therapeutic agents for patients with follicular lymphoma and work through complement-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Optimization of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, in particular by amplifying its effectors, could further increase the efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. We investigated the cytotoxic activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells against follicular lymphoma cells and whether this killing could be increased by promoting antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, in particular a type-II glycoengineered anti-CD20. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were expanded in vitro in the presence of bromohydrin pyrophosphate (Phosphostim) and interleukin-2 and their ability to kill follicular lymphoma primary cells or cell lines was evaluated by flow cytometry cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assays in the presence or absence of three anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: the afucosylated GA101, the chimeric rituximab or the humanized ofatumumab. The ability of these cells to release perforin/granzyme and secrete interferon-γ when co-cultured with follicular lymphoma primary cells or cell lines in the presence or not of the three anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies was also evaluated by CD107a staining and Elispot assays. Phosphostim and interleukin-2 expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were cytotoxic to primary follicular lymphoma cells and their cytotoxic potential was dramatically increased by GA101, a type II glycoengineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, and to a lesser extent, by rituximab and ofatumumab. The increased cytotoxicity was associated with increased secretion of perforin/granzyme and interferon-γ. In-vitro expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently kill primary follicular lymphoma cells and express CD16; anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, in particular GA101, dramatically increase the cytotoxic activity of expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. These preclinical results prompt the development of clinical trials using this antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity property of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2010 · Haematologica
  • Franciane Paul · Jean-François Rossi · Guillaume Cartron
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are currently used for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment and Rituximab (MabThera) and ibritumomab-tiuxetan (Zevalin) currently approved for clinical use. Rituximab has improved survival of patients with follicular and diffuse large B cells lymphoma. Rituximab is safe with uncommon side effects mainly observed during the first infusion. It is basically used associated with chemotherapy every three weeks and also as maintenance therapy for relapsed follicular lymphoma. A better understand of its mechanisms of action has allowed to develop new generation of monoclonal antibody currently tested in clinical trials.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · La Revue du praticien
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    ABSTRACT: High-dose melphalan (HDM) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a standard treatment for patients with multiple myeloma. However, lymphocyte reconstitution is impaired after HDM. Recent work has suggested that the lymphopenia period occurring after various immunosuppressive or chemotherapy treatments may provide an interesting opportunity for adoptive antitumor immunotherapy. The objective of this study was to determine an immunotherapy window after HDM and ASCT, evaluating T cell lymphopenia, and measuring circulating immune cytokine concentrations in patients with multiple myeloma. The counts of T cell subpopulations reached a nadir at day 8 post-ASCT (day 10 post-HDM) and recovered by day 30. IL-6, IL-7, and IL-15 plasma levels increased on a median day 8 post-ASCT, respectively, 35-fold, 8-fold, and 10-fold compared with pre-HDM levels (p < or = 0.05). The increases in IL-7 and IL-15 levels were inversely correlated to the absolute lymphocyte count, unlike monocyte or myeloid counts. Furthermore, we have shown that CD3 T cells present in the ASC graft are activated, die rapidly when they are cultured without cytokine in vitro, and that addition of IL-7 or IL-15 could induce their survival and proliferation. In conclusion, the early lymphodepletion period, occurring 4-11 d post-HDM and ASCT, is associated with an increase of circulating immune cytokines and could be an optimal window to enhance the survival and proliferation of polyclonal T cells present in the ASC autograft and also of specific antimyeloma T cells previously expanded in vitro.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · The Journal of Immunology
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    Guillaume Cartron · Jean-François Rossi
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    ABSTRACT: Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, was introduced into clinical practice in 1997, and has proven to be highly effective in the treatment of B-lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune diseases. Despite such success, in vivo mechanisms of action of anti-CD20 have only recently began to be unraveled, pointing to the crucial role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity response mediated through Fcg receptor signalling. Better understanding of pharmacokinetics and factors influencing individual exposure mediated through anti-CD20 will allow to engineer these molecules to increase their effector responses. Meanwhile, other formats have also been investigated, such as radiolabeled anti-CD20, or coupling of antibodies to cytotoxic drugs such as anti-CD33 used in myeloid leukemia. However these antibodies are used in combination with standard chemotherapy and cannot substitute for cytotoxic drugs. This review summarizes the knowledge acquired through our clinical use of anti-CD20 and authorized monoclonal antibodies in oncohematology and proposes some news areas that will lead to the development of new and more effective therapeutic strategies.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2009 · Medecine sciences: M/S
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    ABSTRACT: gammadelta T lymphocytes are attractive effector cells for immunotherapy. In vitro, they can be expanded and kill efficiently a variety of tumor cells. The frequency and distribution of gammadelta T lymphocytes were compared in tumor lymph nodes of 51 patients with follicular lymphoma lymph nodes (FL-LNs) and 28 patients with inflammatory lymph nodes (I-LNs). gammadelta and CD8 T lymphocytes were less abundant in FL-LNs than in I-LNs (p <or= 10(-7)). These lymphocytes were localized in the perifollicular zone outside of the tumor follicles. Perifollicular gammadelta T lymphocytes expressed CCR7, in contrast to peripheral blood gammadelta T lymphocytes and both perifollicular and peripheral blood gammadelta T lymphocytes expressed CXCR4. The very low number of perifollicular gammadelta T lymphocytes in FL-LNs could be explained in part by migratory problems because of absence of CCL19 expression in FL-LNs compared with I-LNs. Conversely, CCL21 and CXCL12 were similarly expressed in both FL-LNs and I-LNs. CCL19 and CCL21 were expressed in high endothelial venules and lymphatic vessels, whereas CXCL12 was expressed by stromal cells surrounding high endothelial venules and lymphatic vessels. Peripheral gammadelta T lymphocytes from 34 patients with FL, expanded with Phosphostim and IL-2 in vitro, had the same expansion capacity as those from healthy individuals. Thus, gammadelta T lymphocytes can be an attractive source for adoptive immunotherapy in patients with FL, providing they may home in tumor LNs.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2009 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Abundant bone marrow angiogenesis is present in almost all myeloma patients requiring therapy and correlated to treatment response and survival. We assessed the expression of 402 angiogenesis-associated genes by Affymetrix DNA microarrays in 466 samples, including CD138-purified myeloma cells (MMCs) from 300 previously untreated patients, in vivo microcirculation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and in vitro angiogenesis (AngioKit-assay). Normal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs) express a median of 39 proangiogenic (eg, VEGFA, ADM, IGF-1) and 28 antiangiogenic genes (eg, TIMP1, TIMP2). Supernatants of BMPCs unlike those of memory B cells induce angiogenesis in vitro. MMCs do not show a significantly higher median number of expressed proangiogenic (45) or antiangiogenic (31) genes, but 97% of MMC samples aberrantly express at least one of the angiogenic factors HGF, IL-15, ANG, APRIL, CTGF, or TGFA. Supernatants of MMCs and human myeloma cell lines induce significantly higher in vitro angiogenesis compared with BMPCs. In conclusion, BMPCs express a surplus of proangiogenic over antiangiogenic genes transmitting to the ability to induce in vitro angiogenesis. Aberrant expression of proangiogenic and down-regulation of antiangiogenic genes by MMCs further increases the angiogenic stimulus, together leading to bone marrow angiogenesis at various degrees in all myeloma patients.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2009 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: Syndecan-1 is a proteoglycan that concentrates heparin-binding factors on the surface of multiple myeloma cells, and probably plays a major role in multiple myeloma biology. As heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate are the bioactive components of syndecan-1, we analysed the signature of genes encoding 100 proteins involved in synthesis of these chains, i.e. from precursor uptake to post-translational modifications, using Affymetrix microarrays. The expression of enzymes required for heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis was shown to increase in parallel with syndecan-1 expression, throughout the differentiation of memory B cells into plasmablasts and normal bone marrow plasma cells. Sixteen genes were significantly different between normal and malignant plasma cells, nine of these genes -EXT2, CHSY3, CSGALNACT1, HS3ST2, HS2ST1, CHST11, CSGALNACT2, HPSE, SULF2 - encode proteins involved in glycosaminoglycan chain synthesis or modifications. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed in two independent series of patients: B4GALT7, CSGALNACT1, HS2ST1 were associated with a good prognosis whereas EXT1 was linked to a bad prognosis. This study provides an overall picture of the major genes encoding for proteins involved in heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate synthesis and modifications that can be implicated in normal and malignant plasma cells.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2009 · British Journal of Haematology
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic instability and cellular proliferation have been associated with aurora kinase expression in several cancer entities, including multiple myeloma. Therefore, the expression of aurora-A, -B, and -C was determined by Affymetrix DNA microarrays in 784 samples including 2 independent sets of 233 and 345 CD138-purified myeloma cells from previously untreated patients. Chromosomal aberrations were assessed by comprehensive interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and proliferation of primary myeloma cells by propidium iodine staining. We found aurora-A and -B to be expressed at varying frequencies in primary myeloma cells of different patient cohorts, but aurora-C in testis cell samples only. Myeloma cell samples with detectable versus absent aurora-A expression show a significantly higher proliferation rate, but neither a higher absolute number of chromosomal aberrations (aneuploidy), nor of subclonal aberrations (chromosomal instability). The clinical aurora kinase inhibitor VX680 induced apoptosis in 20 of 20 myeloma cell lines and 5 of 5 primary myeloma cell samples. Presence of aurora-A expression delineates significantly inferior event-free and overall survival in 2 independent cohorts of patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy, independent from conventional prognostic factors. Using gene expression profiling, aurora kinase inhibitors as a promising therapeutic option in myeloma can be tailoredly given to patients expressing aurora-A, who in turn have an adverse prognosis.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2009 · Blood
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    ABSTRACT: The survival of malignant plasma cells is a key event in disease occurrence, progression and chemoresistance. Using DNA-microarrays, we analysed the expression of genes coding for 58 proteins linked with extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, caspases and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. We considered six memory B cells (MBC), seven plasmablasts (PPC), seven bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC) and purified myeloma cells (MMC) from 92 newly-diagnosed patients. Forty out of the 58 probe sets enabled the separation of MBC, PPC and BMPC in three homogeneous clusters, characterized by an elevated expression of TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF10B, BCL2A1, CASP8, CASP9 and PMAIP1 genes for MBC, of FAS, FADD, AIFM1, BIRC5, CASP CASP2, CASP3 and CASP6 for PPC and of BCL2, MCL1, BID, BIRC3 and XIAP for BMPC. Thus, B cell differentiation was associated with change of expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes. Regarding MMC, the major finding was TRAIL upregulation that might be counteracted by a high osteoprotegerin production by BM stromal cells and a decreased expression of FAS, APAF1 and BNIP3 compared to normal BMPC. Out of the 40 genes, CASP2 and BIRC5 expression in MMC had adverse prognosis in two independent series of previously-untreated patients.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2009 · British Journal of Haematology

Publication Stats

2k Citations
290.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • Université de Montpellier
      • Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier (IRCM) - UMR_S 896
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 1999-2012
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 2009
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2006-2009
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montpellier
      • Institute for Research in Biotherapy (IRB)
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2004
    • CHU de Lyon - Institut d'hématologie et d'oncologie pédiatrique
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • University Hospital Estaing of Clermont-Ferrand
      Clermont, Auvergne, France
  • 2002
    • University of Arkansas at Little Rock
      Little Rock, Arkansas, United States