Kay-Uwe Wagner

University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska, United States

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Publications (74)398.14 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Janus kinase (JAK) system is involved in numerous cell signaling processes and is highly expressed in cardiac tissue. The JAK isoforms JAK2 is activated by numerous factors known to influence cardiac function and pathologic conditions. However, although abundant, the role of JAK2 in the regulation or maintenance of cardiac homeostasis remains poorly understood. Using the Cre-loxP system, we generated a cardiac-specific deletion of JAK2 in the mouse to assess the effect on cardiac function with animals followed up for a 4-month period after birth. These animals had marked mortality during this period, although at 4 months mortality in male mice (47%) was substantially higher compared with female mice (30%). Both male and female cardiac JAK2-deleted mice had hypertrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and severe left ventricular dysfunction, including a marked reduction in ejection fractions as assessed by serial echocardiography, although the responses in females were somewhat less severe. Defective cardiac function was associated with altered protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-regulatory proteins particularly in hearts from male mice that had depressed levels of SERCA2 and phosphorylated phospholamban. In contrast, SERCA2 was unchanged in hearts of female mice, whereas phosphorylated phospholamban was increased. Our findings suggest that cardiac JAK2 is critical for maintaining normal heart function, and its ablation produces a severe pathologic phenotype composed of myocardial remodeling, heart failure, and pronounced mortality.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · American Journal Of Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Angiotensin II (AngII) activates via angiotensin-II-type-I receptor (AT1R) Janus-kinase-2 (JAK2)/Arhgef1 pathway and subsequently RHOA/Rho-kinase (ROCK), which induces experimental and probably human liver fibrosis. This study investigated the relationship of JAK2 to experimental and human portal hypertension. Design: The mRNA and protein levels of JAK2/ARHGEF1 signalling components were analysed in 49 human liver samples and correlated with clinical parameters of portal hypertension in these patients. Correspondingly, liver fibrosis (bile duct ligation (BDL), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)) was induced in floxed-Jak2 knock-out mice with SM22-promotor (SM22(Cre+)-Jak2(f/f)). Transcription and contraction of primary myofibroblasts from healthy and fibrotic mice and rats were analysed. In two different cirrhosis models (BDL, CCl4) in rats, the acute haemodynamic effect of the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 was assessed using microsphere technique and isolated liver perfusion experiments. Results: Hepatic transcription of JAK2/ARHGEF1 pathway components was upregulated in liver cirrhosis dependent on aetiology, severity and complications of human liver cirrhosis (Model for End-stage Liver disease (MELD) score, Child score as well as ascites, high-risk varices, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis). SM22(Cre+)- Jak2(f/f) mice lacking Jak2 developed less fibrosis and lower portal pressure (PP) than SM22(Cre-)-Jak2(f/f) upon fibrosis induction. Myofibroblasts from SM22(Cre+)-Jak2(f/f) mice expressed less collagen and profibrotic markers upon activation. AG490 relaxed activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro. In cirrhotic rats, AG490 decreased hepatic vascular resistance and consequently the PP in vivo and in situ. Conclusions: Hepatic JAK2/ARHGEF1/ROCK expression is associated with portal hypertension and decompensation in human cirrhosis. The deletion of Jak2 in myofibroblasts attenuated experimental fibrosis and acute inhibition of JAK2 decreased PP. Thus, JAK2 inhibitors, already in clinical use for other indications, might be a new approach to treat cirrhosis with portal hypertension.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Gut
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a dismal prognosis and insights into both disease etiology and targeted intervention are needed. A total of 109 micro-dissected PDA cases were subjected to whole-exome sequencing. Microdissection enriches tumour cellularity and enhances mutation calling. Here we show that environmental stress and alterations in DNA repair genes associate with distinct mutation spectra. Copy number alterations target multiple tumour suppressive/oncogenic loci; however, amplification of MYC is uniquely associated with poor outcome and adenosquamous subtype. We identify multiple novel mutated genes in PDA, with select genes harbouring prognostic significance. RBM10 mutations associate with longer survival in spite of histological features of aggressive disease. KRAS mutations are observed in >90% of cases, but codon Q61 alleles are selectively associated with improved survival. Oncogenic BRAF mutations are mutually exclusive with KRAS and define sensitivity to vemurafenib in PDA models. High-frequency alterations in Wnt signalling, chromatin remodelling, Hedgehog signalling, DNA repair and cell cycle processes are observed. Together, these data delineate new genetic diversity of PDA and provide insights into prognostic determinants and therapeutic targets.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Nature Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Cancer and metastasis reviews
  • Kazuhito Sakamoto · Jeffrey W Schmidt · Kay-Uwe Wagner
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. This malignancy is a complex disease, which is defined by an intrinsic heterogeneity on the histopathological and molecular level as well as response to therapy and outcome. In addition to classical histopathological features, breast cancer can be categorized into at least five major subtypes based on comprehensive gene expression profiling: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, ERBB2-positive, and normal-like breast cancer. Genetically engineered mouse models can serve as tools to study the molecular underpinnings for this disease. Given the genetic complexity that drives the initiation and progression of individual breast cancer subtypes, it is evident that certain models can reflect only particular aspects of this malignancy. In this book chapter, we will primarily focus on advances in modeling breast cancer at defined stages of carcinogenesis using genetically engineered mice. We will discuss the ability as well as shortcomings of these models to faithfully recapitulate the spectrum of human breast cancer subtypes.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
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    ABSTRACT: MUC16 (CA125) is a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein that is up-regulated in multiple cancers including pancreatic cancer (PC). However, the existence and role of carboxyl-terminal MUC16 generated following its cleavage in PC is unknown. Our previous study using a systematic dual-epitope tagged domain deletion approach of carboxyl-terminal MUC16 has demonstrated the generation of a 17-kDa cleaved MUC16 (MUC16-Cter). Here, we demonstrate the functional significance of MUC16-Cter in PC using the dual-epitope tagged version (N-terminal FLAG- and C-terminal HA-tag) of 114 carboxyl-terminal residues of MUC16 (F114HA). In vitro analyses using F114HA transfected MiaPaCa-2 and T3M4 cells showed enhanced proliferation, motility and increased accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase with apoptosis resistance, a feature associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs). This was supported by enrichment of ALDH+ CSCs along with enhanced drug-resistance. Mechanistically, we demonstrate a novel function of MUC16-Cter that promotes nuclear translocation of JAK2 resulting in phosphorylation of Histone-3 up-regulating stemness-specific genes LMO2 and NANOG. Jak2 dependence was demonstrated using Jak2+/+ and Jak2-/- cells. Using eGFP-Luciferase labeled cells, we demonstrate enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic potential of MUC16-Cter in vivo. Taken together, we demonstrate that MUC16-Cter mediated enrichment of CSCs is partly responsible for tumorigenic, metastatic and drug-resistant properties of PC cells.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Oncotarget

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Conditional knockout mouse models are powerful tools to examine the biological and molecular function(s) of genes in specific tissues. The general procedure to generate such genetically engineered mouse models consists of three main steps. The first step is to find the appropriate genomic clone of the gene of interest and to design the cloning and Southern blot strategies. The second step is the cloning of the gene-targeting vector with all its essential components including positive and negative selection cassettes and the insertion of LoxP sites. Although conventional methods are still being widely used for DNA cloning, we describe in this book chapter the use of λ Red phage-based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli to capture the genomic DNA of the gene of interest and to assemble the gene-targeting vector. This new method provides several advantages as it does not require the presence of restriction sites within the gene of interest to insert LoxP-flanked DNA fragments. In the final step, the gene-targeting vector is transferred into embryonic stem (ES) cells, and successfully targeted ES cell clones are injected into mouse blastocysts to generate conditional knockout mice.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Methods in Molecular Biology
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    Wan-Chi Lin · Nirakar Rajbhandari · Kay-Uwe Wagner
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    ABSTRACT: Significant advances have been made in the identification of key molecular pathways that play pivotal roles in the initiation and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Among the common genetic and epigenetic changes, oncogenic mutations in Kras and upregulation of the c-Myc oncogene are frequent events in PDAC. Using genetically defined in vivo models, several studies have recently demonstrated that expression of mutant Kras and c-Myc is equally important for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic cancer. The targeted downregulation of a single oncogene resulted in cancer cell death at primary and metastatic sites. These findings are very encouraging and provide a strong rationale for the development of targeted therapies against these oncogenic drivers. Despite what seemed to be a complete response to the ablation of the oncogene, a few dormant cancer cells remained present, and it was demonstrated that they are a cellular reservoir for a swift relapse of pancreatic cancer following oncogene reactivation. This review summarizes the basic principles of cancer dormancy and the applicability of the novel genetic models for reversible metastatic PDAC to elucidate the role of cancer stem cells as well as biologic and molecular mechanisms that mediate the survival of dormant tumor cells. Cancer Res; 74(8); 1-6. ©2014 AACR.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: The serine-threonine kinase AKT1 plays essential roles during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and progression of breast cancer. AKT1 is generally considered a ubiquitously expressed gene, and its persistent activation is transcriptionally controlled by regulatory elements characteristic of housekeeping gene promoters. We recently identified a novel Akt1 transcript in mice (Akt1m), which is induced by growth factors and their signal transducers of transcription from a previously unknown promoter. The purpose of this study was to examine whether normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cells express an orthologous AKT1m transcript and whether its expression is deregulated in cancer cells. Initial sequence analyses were performed using the UCSC Genome Browser and GenBank to assess the potential occurrence of an AKT1m transcript variant in human cells and to identify conserved promoter sequences that are orthologous to the murine Akt1m. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the transcriptional activation of AKT1m in mouse mammary tumors as well as 41 normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines and selected primary breast cancers. We identified four new AKT1 transcript variants in human breast cancer cells that are orthologous to the murine Akt1m and that encode the full-length kinase. These transcripts originate from an alternative promoter that is conserved between humans and mice. Akt1m is upregulated in the majority of luminal-type and basal-type mammary cancers in four different genetically engineered mouse models. Similarly, a subset of human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers exhibited a higher expression of orthologous AKT1m transcripts. The existence of an alternative promoter that drives the expression of the unique AKT1m transcript may provide a mechanism by which the levels of AKT1 can be temporally and spatially regulated at particular physiological states, such as cancer, where a heightened activity of this kinase is required.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · BMC Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) is an essential mediator of cytokine receptor signaling and plays important roles in the proliferation of alveolar progenitors and the survival of functionally differentiated epithelial cells in the mammary gland. A deregulated expression and activation of Stat5 leads to precocious alveolar development in the absence of pregnancy hormones, impaired mammary gland remodeling following the cessation of lactation, and mammary tumor formation. We reported previously that Stat5 induces the transcription of the Akt1 gene from a novel promoter. In this report, we provide experimental evidence that Akt1 is an essential mediator for the biological function of Stat5 as a survival factor. Additionally, Stat5 controls the expression of the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PI3 kinase (p85α and p110α), thereby greatly augmenting signaling through the pro-survival PI3K/Akt pathway. In agreement with this model, we observed that the constitutive activation of Stat5 cooperates with the loss-of-function of the tumor suppressor PTEN by accelerating the formation of preneoplastic lesions and mammary tumors. The mammary gland-specific ablation of Stat5 is sufficient to prevent mammary carcinogenesis in a genuine mouse model for Cowden syndrome. Therefore, targeting the Jak2/Stat5 pathway might be a suitable strategy to prevent breast cancer in patients that carry a mutant PTEN allele.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Molecular and Cellular Biology
  • Qian Zhang · Kazuhito Sakamoto · Kay-Uwe Wagner
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    ABSTRACT: In response to the ligand-mediated activation of cytokine receptors, cells decide whether to proliferate or to undergo differentiation. D-type Cyclins (Cyclin D1, D2, or D3) and their associated Cyclin-dependent Kinases (CDK4, CDK6) connect signals from cytokines to the cell cycle machinery, and they propel cells through the G1 restriction point and into the S phase, after which growth factor stimulation is no longer essential to complete cell division. D-type Cyclins are upregulated in many human malignancies including breast cancer to promote an uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. After summarizing important aspects of the cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulation and the posttranslational modification of D-type Cyclins, this review will highlight the physiological significance of these cell cycle regulators during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Although the vast majority of published reports focus almost exclusively on the role of Cyclin D1 in breast cancer, we summarize here previous and recent findings that demonstrate an important contribution of the remaining two members of this Cyclin family, in particular Cyclin D3, for the growth of ErbB2-associated breast cancer cells in humans and in mouse models. New data from genetically engineered models as well as the pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suggest that targeting the combined functions of D-type Cyclins could be a suitable strategy for the treatment of ErbB2-positive and potentially other types of breast cancer.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
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    ABSTRACT: The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (Stat5) plays a significant role in normal hematopoiesis and a variety of hematopoietic malignancies. Deficiency in Stat5 causes impaired cytokine-mediated proliferation and survival of progenitors and their differentiated descendants along major hematopoietic lineages such as erythroid, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Overexpression and persistent activation of Stat5 are sufficient for neoplastic transformation and development of multi-lineage leukemia in a transplant model. Little is known, however, whether a continuous activation of this signal transducer is essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic malignancies. To address this issue, we developed transgenic mice that express a hyperactive mutant of Stat5 in hematopoietic progenitors and derived lineages in a ligand-controlled manner. In contrast to the transplant model, expression of mutant Stat5 did not adversely affect normal hematopoiesis in the presence of endogenous wildtype Stat5 alleles. However, the gain-of-function of this signal transducer in mice that carry Stat5a/b hypomorphic alleles resulted in abnormally high numbers of circulating granulocytes that caused severe airway obstruction. Downregulation of hyperactive Stat5 in diseased animals restored normal granulopoiesis, which also resulted in a swift clearance of granulocytes from the lung. Moreover, we demonstrate that Stat5 promotes the initiation and maintenance of severe granulophilia in a cell autonomous manner. The results of this study show that the gain-of-function of Stat5 causes excessive granulopoiesis and prolonged survival of granulocytes in circulation. Collectively, our findings underline the critical importance of Stat5 in maintaining a normal balance between myeloid and lymphoid cells during hematopoiesis, and we provide direct evidence for a function of Stat5 in granulophilia-associated pulmonary dysfunction.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Germline deletion of Jak2 in mice results in embryonic lethality at E12.5 due to impaired hematopoiesis. However, the role that Jak2 might play in late gestation and postnatal life is unknown. To understand this, we utilized a conditional knockout approach that allowed for the deletion of Jak2 at various stages of prenatal and postnatal life. Specifically, Jak2 was deleted beginning at either mid/late gestation (E12.5), at postnatal day 4 (PN4), or at ∼2 months of age. Deletion of Jak2 beginning at E12.5 resulted in embryonic death characterized by a lack of hematopoiesis. Deletion beginning at PN4 was also lethal due to a lack of erythropoiesis. Deletion of Jak2 in young adults was characterized by blood cytopenias, abnormal erythrocyte morphology, decreased marrow hematopoietic potential, and splenic atrophy. However, death was observed in only 20% of the mutants. Further analysis of these mice suggested that the increased survivability was due to an incomplete deletion of Jak2 and subsequent re-population of Jak2 expressing cells, as conditional deletion in mice having one floxed Jak2 allele and one null allele resulted in a more severe phenotype and subsequent death of all animals. We found that the deletion of Jak2 in the young adults had a differential effect on hematopoietic lineages; specifically, conditional Jak2 deletion in young adults severely impaired erythropoiesis and thrombopoiesis, modestly affected granulopoiesis and monocytopoiesis, and had no effect on lymphopoiesis. Interestingly, while the hematopoietic organs of these mutant animals were severely affected by the deletion of Jak2, we found that the hearts, kidneys, lungs, and brains of these same mice were histologically normal. From this, we conclude that Jak2 plays an essential and non-redundant role in hematopoiesis during both prenatal and postnatal life and this has direct implications regarding the inhibition of Jak2 in humans.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The initiation and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is governed by a series of genetic and epigenetic changes, but it is still unknown whether these alterations are required for the maintenance of primary and metastatic PDAC. We show here that the c-Myc oncogene is upregulated throughout the entire process of neoplastic progression in human PDAC and in genetically engineered mice that express mutant Kras. To experimentally address whether c-Myc is essential for the growth and survival of cancer cells, we developed a novel mouse model that allows a temporally and spatially controlled expression of this oncogene in pancreatic progenitors and derived lineages of the exocrine pancreas. Unlike previous reports, upregulation of c-Myc was sufficient to induce the formation of adenocarcinomas after a short latency without additional genetic manipulation of cell survival pathways. Deficiency in Cdkn2a increased the rate of metastasis but had no effect on tumor latency or c-Myc-mediated cancer maintenance. Despite a macroscopically complete regression of primary, metastatic, and transplantable tumors following the ablation of c-Myc, some cancer cells remained dormant. A significant number of these residual neoplastic cells expressed cancer stem cell markers, and re-expression of exogenous c-Myc in these cells led to rapid cancer recurrence. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that c-Myc plays a significant role in the progression and maintenance of PDAC, but besides targeting this oncogene or its downstream effectors, additional therapeutic strategies are necessary to eradicate residual cancer cells to prevent disease recurrence. Cancer Res; 73(6); 1-10. ©2012 AACR.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in immune responses, linking innate and adaptive immunity. We found here that DC-specific deletion of the transcription factor STAT5 was not critical for development but was required for T helper type 2 (TH2), but not TH1, allergic responses in both the skin and lungs. Loss of STAT5 in DCs led to the inability to respond to thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). STAT5 was required for TSLP-dependent DC activation, including upregulation of the expression of costimulatory molecules and chemokine production. Furthermore, TH2 responses in mice with DC-specific loss of STAT5 resembled those seen in mice deficient in the receptor for TSLP. Our results show that the TSLP-STAT5 axis in DCs is a critical component for the promotion of type 2 immunity at barrier surfaces.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Nature Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal malignancy primarily driven by activated Kras mutations and characterized by the deregulation of several genes including mucins. Previous studies on mucins have identified their significant role in both benign and malignant human diseases including PC progression and metastasis. However, the initiation of MUC expression during PC remains unknown because of lack of early stage tumor tissues from PC patients. In the present study, we have evaluated stage specific expression patterns of mucins during mouse PC progression in (KrasG12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC)) murine PC model from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. In agreement with previous studies on human PC, we observed a progressive increase in the expression of mucins particularly Muc1, Muc4 and Muc5AC in the pancreas of KC (as early as PanIN I) mice with advancement of PanIN lesions and PDAC both at mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, mucin expression correlated with the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ (p < 0.0062), CXCL1 (p < 0.00014) and CXCL2 (p < 0.08) in the pancreas of KC mice, which are known to induce mucin expression. Further, we also observed progressive increase in inflammation in pancreas of KC mice from 10 to 50 weeks of age as indicated by the increase in the macrophage infiltration. Overall, this study corroborates with previous human studies that indicated the aberrant overexpression of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC5AC mucins during the progression of PC. Our study reinforces the potential utility of the KC murine model for determining the functional role of mucins in PC pathogenesis by crossing KC mice with corresponding mucin knockout mice and evaluating mucin based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for lethal PC.
    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal malignancy primarily driven by activated Kras mutations and characterized by the deregulation of several genes including mucins. Previous studies on mucins have identified their significant role in both benign and malignant human diseases including PC progression and metastasis. However, the initiation of MUC expression during PC remains unknown because of lack of early stage tumor tissues from PC patients. Methods In the present study, we have evaluated stage specific expression patterns of mucins during mouse PC progression in (KrasG12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC)) murine PC model from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. Results In agreement with previous studies on human PC, we observed a progressive increase in the expression of mucins particularly Muc1, Muc4 and Muc5AC in the pancreas of KC (as early as PanIN I) mice with advancement of PanIN lesions and PDAC both at mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, mucin expression correlated with the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ (p < 0.0062), CXCL1 (p < 0.00014) and CXCL2 (p < 0.08) in the pancreas of KC mice, which are known to induce mucin expression. Further, we also observed progressive increase in inflammation in pancreas of KC mice from 10 to 50 weeks of age as indicated by the increase in the macrophage infiltration. Overall, this study corroborates with previous human studies that indicated the aberrant overexpression of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC5AC mucins during the progression of PC. Conclusions Our study reinforces the potential utility of the KC murine model for determining the functional role of mucins in PC pathogenesis by crossing KC mice with corresponding mucin knockout mice and evaluating mucin based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for lethal PC.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Journal of Hematology & Oncology
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    Kazuhito Sakamoto · Jeffrey W Schmidt · Kay-Uwe Wagner
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    ABSTRACT: We have generated a new and improved transgenic mouse strain that permits a temporally controlled expression of transgenes throughout mammary gland development. High expression of the tetracycline-regulatible transactivator (tTA) under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV-LTR) is restricted to mammary epithelial cells and the salivary gland. The novel MMTV-tTA mouse strain induces a sustained transactivation of responder transgenes, which can be swiftly suppressed through administration of doxycycline (Dox). An important characteristic of this strain is its expression in early progenitor cells of mammary gland anlagen beginning at day 13.5 of embryonic development. We show here that the MMTV-tTA can be used in combination with GFP reporter strains to visualize CK8/CK14-dual positive progenitors in newborn females and their derived basal and luminal epithelial cell lineages in adult females. Our observations suggest that the novel MMTV-tTA can be utilized to express exogenous proteins in multipotent mammary progenitors during the earliest stages of mammary gland development to assess their biological significance throughout mammogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the expression of the MMTV-tTA is sustained during mammary gland tumorigenesis in female mice expressing wildtype ErbB2. This makes this strain particular valuable to target the expression of exogenous proteins into developing mammary tumors to assess their significance in biological processes, such as tumor cell growth and survival, metabolism, and metastasis.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The Tumor Susceptibility Gene 101 (Tsg101) encodes a multi-domain protein that mediates a variety of molecular and biological processes including the trafficking and lysosomal degradation of cell surface receptors. Conventional and conditional knockout models have demonstrated an essential requirement of this gene for cell cycle progression and cell viability, but the consequences of a complete ablation of Tsg101 on intracellular processes have not been examined to date. In this study, we employed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that carry two Tsg101 conditional knockout alleles to investigate the expression of ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases as well as stress-induced intracellular processes that are known to be associated with a defect in growth and cell survival. The conditional deletion of the Tsg101 gene in this well-controlled experimental model resulted in a significant reduction in the steady-state levels of the EGFR and ErbB2 but a stress-induced elevation in the phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases independent of growth factor stimulation. As part of an integrated stress response, Tsg101-deficient cells exhibited extensive remodeling of actin filaments and greatly enlarged lysosomes that were enriched with the autophagy-related protein LC3. The increase in the transcriptional activation and expression of LC3 and its association with Lamp1-positive lysosomes in a PI3K-dependent manner suggest that Tsg101 knockout cells utilize autophagy as a survival mechanism prior to their ultimate death. Collectively, this study shows that a knockout of the Tsg101 gene causes complex intracellular changes associated with stress response and cell death. These multifaceted alterations need to be recognized as they have an impact on defining particular functions for Tsg101 in processes such as signal transduction and lysosomal/endosomal trafficking.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · PLoS ONE

Publication Stats

3k Citations
398.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2015
    • University of Nebraska at Omaha
      • • Department of Pathology and Microbiology
      • • Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • 2002-2015
    • University of Nebraska Medical Center
      • Department of Pathology and Microbiology
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Ашбърн, Virginia, United States
    • Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
      • Department of Pathology
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 2003-2014
    • The Nebraska Medical Center
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • 2004
    • Georgetown University
      • Department of Oncology
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 1997-2002
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Laboratory of Metabolism
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
  • 2001
    • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
      Maryland, United States