Ye Sun Han

Konkuk University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (50)119.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Detection and quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) within cells are important for the study of the molecular mechanisms in cancer. Human ribosomal protein S3 (hRpS3), which involved in DNA repair, has high binding affinity to 8-oxoG. We developed an imaging probe to detect 8-oxoG using a specific peptide of hRpS3. Sequence analysis was conducted to elucidate the 8-oxoG-specific binding region of hRpS3, and three truncated mutants, D1 (amino acids 1–85), D2 (amino acids 86–159), and D3 (amino acids 160–242), were constructed. Both wild-type-hRpS3 and D2 were able to bind 8-oxoG, which is consistent with the results of a previous report on the role of K134 in Drosophila melanogaster RpS3. We synthesized a specific peptide and covalently linked with a fluorophore (FPR-552, similar to Cy3) to generate an 8-oxoG imaging probe. Our 8-oxoG S3-probe successfully detected the presence of 8-oxoG in damaged cells. Furthermore, this probe has threefold higher sensitivity than 8-oxoG DNA lesion antibody.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society
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    ABSTRACT: Human DNA topoisomerase II-binding protein 1 (hTopBP1) plays an important role in DNA replication and the DNA damage checkpoint pathway. The human mutY homolog (hMYH) is a base excision repair DNA glycosylase that excises adenines or 2-hydroxyadenines that are mispaired with guanine or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). hTopBP1 and hMYH were involved in ATR-mediated Chk1 activation, moreover, both of them were associated with ATR and hRad9 which known as checkpoint-involved proteins. Therefore, we investigated whether hTopBP1 interacted with hMYH, and what the function of their interaction is. We documented the interaction between hTopBP1 and hMYH and showed that this interaction increased in a hydroxyurea-dependent manner. We also mapped the hMYH-interacting region of hTopBP1 (residues 444-991). In addition, we investigated several cell cycle-related proteins and found that co-knockdown of hTopBP1 and hMYH significantly diminished cell cycle arrest due to compromised checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation. Moreover, we observed that hMYH was essential for the accumulation of hTopBP1 on damaged DNA, where hTopBP1 interacts with hRad9, a component of the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 complex. The accumulation of hTopBP1 on chromatin and its subsequent interaction with hRad9 lead to cell cycle arrest, a process mediated by Chk1 phosphorylation and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) activation. Our results suggested that hMYH is necessary for the accumulation of hTopBP1 to DNA damage lesion to induce the association of hTopBP1 with 9-1-1 and that the interaction between hMYH and hTopBP1 is essential for Chk1 activation. Therefore, we suggest that the interaction between hMYH and hTopBP1 is crucial for activation of the ATR-mediated cell cycle checkpoint.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Cell and Bioscience
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    ABSTRACT: The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway is a classical immune system pathway that plays a key role in regulating cell survival and apoptosis. The TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD) protein is recruited to the death domain of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), where it interacts with TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) for the induction of apoptosis, necrosis, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. In this study, we found that the human MutY homolog (hMYH) interacted with human TRADD (hTRADD) via the C-terminal domain of hMYH. Moreover, under conditions promoting TNF-α-induced cell death or survival in HeLa cells, this interaction was weakened or enhanced, respectively. The interaction between hMYH and hTRADD was important for signaling pathways mediated by TNF-α. Our results also suggested that the hTRADD-hMYH association was involved in the nuclear translocation of NFκB and formation of the TNFR1-TRADD complex. Thus, this study identified a novel mechanism through which the hMYH-hTRADD interaction may affect the TNF-α signaling pathway. In HeLa cells, the hTRADD-hMYH interaction functioned in both cell survival and apoptosis pathways following TNF-α stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Cell cycles, ordered series of events modulating cell growth and division, are tightly regulated by complexes containing cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins. Cyclin O is a novel cyclin family protein which interacts with CDK2. However, the molecular effects of cyclin O on the activity of CDK2 have not been fully evaluated. In this study, an interaction between cyclin O and CDK2 was identified by co-immunoprecipitation and the effect of cyclin O on the kinase activity of CDK2 was investigated using cyclin O point mutants. Co-immunoprecipitation was achieved using using HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells which were transiently transfected with vectors expressing cyclin O and CDK2, which revealed that cyclin O interacted with CDK2, particularly with the active form of endogenous CDK2. Cyclin O was expressed as several different bands with molecular weights between 45 and 50 kDa, possibly due to different post-translational modifications. When co-expressed with CDK2, cyclin O appeared as a band with a molecular weight of 50 kDa. Treatment with calf intestinal phosphatase reduced the intensity of the uppermost band. Mass spectroscopic analysis of cyclin O co-expressed with CDK2 revealed that the 81st serine residue of cyclin O was phosphorylated. The in vitro kinase activity of CDK2 phosphorylating histone H1 was markedly increased in the cells overexpressing cyclin O. This activity was reduced in cells overexpressing cyclin O, in which the 81st serine had been replaced with alanine (S81A). These results suggest that cyclin O is a novel cyclin family protein that regulates CDK2 kinase activity, which is mediated by the phosphorylation of the 81st serine residue of cyclin O.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Oncology letters
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    ABSTRACT: Adiponectin, an adipokine has been described to show physiological benefits against obesity-related malfunctions and vascular dysfunction. Several natural compounds that promote expression and secretion of adipokines in adipocytes could be useful for treating metabolic disorders. In this study, we investigated the effect of fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, on the regulation of adiponectin in the adipocytes using 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The expression and secretion of adiponectin increased in 3T3-L1 cells upon the treatment of fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. Fisetin-induced adiponectin secretion was inhibited by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) antagonists. It was also revealed that fisetin increased the activities of PPARs and silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the upregulation of adiponectin and the activation of PPARs induced by fisetin were prevented by a SIRT1 inhibitor. Fisetin also promoted deacetylation of PPAR gamma co-activator 1, PGC-1 and its interaction with PPARs. We also found SIRT knockdown by siRNA significantly decreased both adiponectin production and PPARs-PGC-1 interaction. These results provide evidence that fisetin promotes the gene expression of adiponectin through the activation of SIRT1 and PPARs in adipocytes.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Background Human MutY glycosylase homolog (hMYH), a component of the base excision repair pathway, is responsible for the generation of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) is a heterotrimeric protein complex that plays a role in cell cycle checkpoint control and DNA repair. In humans, hMYH and 9-1-1 interact through Hus1 and to a lesser degree with Rad1 in the presence of DNA damage. In Saccharomyces pombe, each component of the 9-1-1 complex interacts directly with SpMYH. The glycosylase activity of hMYH is stimulated by Hus1 and the 9-1-1 complex and enhanced by DNA damage treatment. Cells respond to different stress conditions in different manners. Therefore, we investigated whether Rad9 interacted with hMYH under different stresses. Here, we identified and visualized the interaction between hRad9 and hMYH and investigated the functional consequences of this interaction. Results Co-IP and BiFC indicates that hMYH interacts with hRad9. As shown by GST-pull down assay, this interaction is direct. Furthermore, BiFC with deletion mutants of hMYH showed that hRad9 interacts with N-terminal region of hMYH. The interaction was enhanced by hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. mRNA and protein levels of hMYH and hRad9 were increased following HU treatment. A marked increase in p-Chk1 (S345) and p-Cdk2 (T14, Y15) was observed. But this phosphorylation decreased in siMYH- or siRad9-transfected cells, and more pronounced decrease observed in co-transfected cells. Conclusions Our data reveal that hRad9 interacts directly with N-terminal region of hMYH. This interaction is enhanced by HU treatment. Knockdown of one or both protein result in decreasing Chk1 and Cdk2 phosphorylation. Since both protein functions in the early detection of DNA damage, we suggest that this interaction occurs early in DNA damage pathway.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · BMC Molecular Biology
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    ABSTRACT: Xo2276 is a putative transcription activator-like effector (TALE) in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Xo2276 was expressed with a TAP-tag at the C-terminus in Xoo cells to enable quantitative analysis of protein expression and secretion. Nearly all TAP-tagged Xo2276 existed in an insoluble form; addition of rice leaf extracts from a Xoosusceptible rice cultivar, Milyang23, significantly stimulated secretion of TAP-tagged Xo2276 into the medium. In a T3SS-defective Xoo mutant strain, secretion of TAPtagged Xo2276 was blocked. Xo2276 is a Xoo ortholog of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) AvrBs3 and contains a conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD), which includes 19.5 tandem repeats of 34 amino acids. Xo2276- DBD was expressed in E. coli and purified. Direct in vitro recognition of Xo2276-DBD on a putative target DNA sequence was confirmed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This is the first study measuring the homologous expression and secretion of Xo2276 in vitro using rice leaf extract and its direct in vitro binding to the specific target DNA sequence.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
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    ABSTRACT: Etoposide (ETP) treatment of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related protein (ATR)-, topoisomerase-binding protein-1 (TopBP1) and human MutY homolog (hMYH)-depleted cells results in a significant reduction in apoptotic signaling. The association between ATR or TopBP1 and hMYH increased following ETP treatment. In hMYH knockdown cells, the interaction between ATR and TopBP1 decreased following ETP treatment. We suggest that hMYH functions as a sensor of ETP-induced apoptosis. The results suggest that in the absence of hMYH, cells are unable to recognize the damage signal and the ATR pathway is not activated.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2012 · Oncology letters
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    ABSTRACT: This study demonstrated that the surface crystallinity of carbon nanostructures is an additional independent factor that should be considered for the inhibition of cancer proliferation without activating reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, cytotoxic evaluation of both proliferating cancer cells and fully differentiated nerve cells (i.e. non-proliferative) showed selective cytotoxicity: single-walled and highly crystalline carbon nanostructures aggressively inhibited the proliferation of glioma cancer cells, but exhibited no notable cytotoxicity effects on differentiated nerve cells. Although single-wall carbon nanotubes have been shown to elicit potent proinflammatory responses by means of trigger ROS, our results demonstrated that highly crystalline carbon structures can be utilized as a selective antiproliferative agent against brain tumor cells without increasing the ROS level and without significant cytotoxic effects to adjacent nerve cells.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012 · Acta Biomaterialia
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    ABSTRACT: Saturated fatty acids are known to activate macrophages and induce vascular inflammation. Although cytokines from activated macrophage influence other vascular cells, the influence of saturated fatty acids on the paracrine effect of macrophages is not fully understood yet. Here we examined the impact of palmitate on the effect of macrophages on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and their mediators. SMCs proliferation increased significantly after treatment with conditioned media from palmitate-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. SMC migration was found to be greater after treatment with palmitate-conditioned media. SM α-actin and SM22α were decreased in SMCs treated with palmitate-conditioned media. When stimulated with palmitate, RAW264.7 cells secreted more bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 and BMP4 into the cell culture media. SMC proliferation, migration, and phenotypic changes were attenuated after treatment of neutralizing antibodies against BMPs or knockdown of BMPs with siRNA. The influences of these proteins were further confirmed by direct treatment of recombinant BMP2 and BMP4 on SMCs. Particularly, the effects of BMPs on SMC migration on phenotypic change were obvious, whereas their effect on SMC proliferation seemed not significant or modest. In conclusion, palmitate promoted macrophages' paracrine effects on SMC proliferation, migration, and phenotypic change. The effect of stimulated macrophages was mediated, at least in part, by BMP2 and BMP4. These results suggest a novel mechanism linking saturated fatty acids and the progression of vascular diseases that is possibly mediated by BMPs from macrophages.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Transcriptional factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) plays a crucial role in human breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. The carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a U-box-type ubiquitin ligase that induces ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of its substrate proteins. In this study, we investigated the role of CHIP in the NF-κB pathway in the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly aggressive breast cancer cell line. We showed that overexpression of CHIP significantly inhibits the invasion of the MDA-MB-231 cells. The overexpression of CHIP suppressed expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, CHIP strongly inhibited the nuclear localization and the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. The activation of the IkappaB kinase complex (IKK) was also blocked by CHIP overexpression. Importantly, CHIP overexpression resulted in a significant decrease in the level of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2), an upstream key player in the NF-κB pathway. However, the level of TRAF2 was restored after treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132. Moreover, CHIP overexpression promoted the ubiquitination of TRAF2. We also found cell invasion significantly decreased in cells transfected with TRAF2 small interfering RNA (siRNA). In contrast, when CHIP expression was suppressed by siRNA in poorly invasive MCF-7 cells, cell invasion significantly increased in conjunction with enhanced NF-κB activation and TRAF2 levels. Taken together, these results suggest that CHIP regulates NF-κB-mediated cell invasion via the down-regulation of TRAF2.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), including TAT-CPP, have been used to deliver exogenous proteins into living cells. Although a number of proteins fused to TAT-CPP can be delivered into various cells, little is known about the proteolytic cleavage of TAT-fusion proteins in cells. In this study, we demonstrate that a small heat shock protein (sHSP), alphaB-crystallin (αB-crystallin), delivered by TAT-CPP is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells. Recombinant TAT-αB-crystallin was efficiently transduced into H9c2 cells. For a few hours following protein transduction, generation of a 14-kDa fragment, a cleavage band of TAT-αB-crystallin, increased in a time-dependent manner. This fragment was observed only in detergent-insoluble fractions. Interestingly, treatment with MMP inhibitors blocked the cleavage of TAT-αB-crystallin. In test tubes, recombinant MMP-1 processed TAT-αB-crystallin to generate the major cleavage fragment 14-kDa, as observed in the cells treated with TAT-αB-crystallin. The N-terminal sequences of the 14-kDa fragment were identified as Leu-Arg-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp-Phe, indicating that this fragment is generated by cleavage at Phe54-Leu55 of αB-crystallin. The MMP-1-selective inhibitor abolished the production of 14-kDa fragments in cells. In addition, the cleaved fragment of TAT-αB-crystallin was significantly reduced in cells transfected with MMP-1 siRNA. Moreover, the enzymatic activity of MMP-1 was markedly increased in TAT-αB-crystallin-treated cells. TAT-αB-crystallin has a cytoprotective effect on H9c2 cells under hypoxic insult, moreover, MMP-1-selective inhibitor treatment led to even increased cell viability. These results suggest that MMP-1 is responsible for proteolytic cleavage of TAT-αB-crystallin during its intracellular transduction in H9c2 cells.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2011 · Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is a multifunctional protein involved in translation, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The relationship between rpS3 and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) involved in cell cycle regulation is not yet known. Here, we show that rpS3 is phosphorylated by Cdk1 in G2/M phase. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays revealed that Cdk1 interacted with rpS3. An in vitro kinase assay showed that Cdk1 phosphorylated rpS3 protein. Phosphorylation of rpS3 increased in nocodazole-arrested mitotic cells; however, treatment with Cdk1 inhibitor or Cdk1 siRNA significantly attenuated this phosphorylation event. The phosphorylation of a mutant form of rpS3, T221A, was significantly reduced compared with wild-type rpS3. Decreased phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation of T221A was much more pronounced in G2/M phase. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of rpS3 by Cdk1 occurs at Thr221 during G2/M phase and, moreover, that this event is important for nuclear accumulation of rpS3.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · BMB reports
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of human MutY homolog (hMYH) on the activation of checkpoint proteins in response to hydroxyurea (HU) and ultraviolet (UV) treatment was investigated in hMYH-disrupted HEK293 cells. hMYH-disrupted cells decreased the phosphorylation of Chk1 upon HU or UV treatment and increased the phosphorylation of Cdk2 and the amount of Cdc25A, but not Cdc25C. In siMYH-transfected cells, the increased rate of phosphorylated Chk1 upon HU or UV treatment was lower than that in siGFP-transfected cells, meaning that hMYH was involved in the activation mechanism of Chk1 upon DNA damage. The phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3- related protein (ATR) upon HU or UV treatment was decreased in hMYH-disrupted HEK293 and HaCaT cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that hMYH was immunoprecipitated by anti-ATR. These results suggest that hMYH may interact with ATR and function as a mediator of Chk1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage.
    Preview · Article · May 2011 · BMB reports
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    ABSTRACT: Quercetin is a low molecular weight flavonoid found in dietary fruits and vegetables. Quercetin, like other flavonoids, has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. However, relatively little is known about how quercetin achieves its neuroprotective abilities. The alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor is one of several excitatory receptors, which play an important role in postsynaptic neurotransmission. Over-stimulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor including AMPA receptors is closely associated with excitatory neurotoxicities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of quercetin on the glutamate-induced inward current (IGlu) in Xenopus oocytes that heterologously express human AMPA receptor and stargazin, an auxiliary subunit of AMPA receptor. IGlu was measured using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. In oocytes injected with cRNAs coding AMPA receptor (GluR1) and stargazin, quercetin inhibited IGlu in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The IC50 was 84.9+/-15.0 microM. Quercetin action on IGlu was attenuated by increasing glutamate concentration, and was membrane holding potential-dependent. These results show a possibility that quercetin interacts with AMPA receptor, which was heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and that quercetin action on IGlu of AMPA receptor could be one of contributions of quercetin-mediated neuroprotections.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of 7-O-butyl naringenin (BN), a chemically synthesized derivative of naringenin, was tested on the proliferation of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. BN inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in dosedependent manner (IC50: 67.5±2.1 μM), resulting in an increase in the sub-G1 phase cell population. BN induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were reduced by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). BN also increased the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH4-terminal kinase 1/2 (SAPK/JNK1/2), c-Jun, and p38. However, the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) was decreased in BN-treated cells. Pretreatment of cells with the specific inhibitors SP600125 and SB203580 diminished the BN-induced activation of SAPK/JNK1/2 and p38, respectively. These results indicate that the BN-induced cytotoxicity of MCF-7 cells is mediated by the generation of ROS as well as through the p38, SAPK/JNK1/2, and c-Jun activation signaling pathways. BN may therefore possess chemotherapeutic potential as an anti-proliferative agent.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2010 · Food science and biotechnology
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    ABSTRACT: We developed a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) strategy using Dronpa, a new fluorescent protein with reversible photoswitching activity and fast responsibility to light, to monitor protein-protein interactions in cells. Dronpa was split at residue Glu164 in order to generate two Dronpa fragments [Dronpa N-terminal: DN (Met1-Glu164), Dronpa C-terminal: DC (Gly165-Lys224)]. DN or DC was separately fused with C terminus of hHus1 or N terminus of hRad1. Flexible linker [(GGGGS)×2] was introduced to enhance Dronpa complementation by hHus1-hRad1 interaction. Furthermore, we developed expression vectors to visualize the interaction between hMYH and hHus1. Gene fragments corresponding to the coding regions of hMYH and hHus1 were N-terminally or C-terminally fused with DN and DC coding region. Complemented Dronpa fluorescence was only observed in HEK293 cells cotransfected with hHus1-LDN and DCL-hRad1 expression vectors, but not with hHus1-LDN or DCL-hRad1 expression vector alone. Western blot analysis of immunoprecipitated samples using anti-c-myc or anti-flag showed that DN-fused hHus1 interacted with DC-fused hRad1. Complemented Dronpa fluorescence was also observed in cells cotransfected with hMYH-LDN and DCL-hHus1 expression vectors or hMYH-LDN and hHus1-LDC expression vectors. Furthermore, complemented Dronpa, induced by the interaction between hMYH-LDN and DCL-hHus1, showed almost identical photoswitching activity as that of native Dronpa. These results demonstrate that BiFC using Dronpa can be successfully used to investigate protein-protein interaction in live cells. Furthermore, the fact that complemented Dronpa has a reversible photoswitching activity suggests that it can be used as a tool for tracking protein-protein interaction.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2010 · Molecular imaging and biology: MIB: the official publication of the Academy of Molecular Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) is a checkpoint protein complex playing roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair or apoptosis. Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is the major DNA glycosylase responsible for repairing a specific aberrantly oxidized nucleotide, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). In this study, we identified a novel interaction between hOGG1 and human 9-1-1, and investigated the functional consequences of this interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation assays using transiently transfected HEK293 cells demonstrated an interaction between hOGG1 and the 9-1-1 proteins. Subsequently, GST pull-down assays using bacterially expressed and purified hOGG1-His and GST-fused 9-1-1 subunits (GST-hRad9, GST-hRad1, and GST-hHus1) demonstrated that hOGG1 interacted directly with the individual subunits of the human 9-1-1 complex. In vitro excision assay, which employed a DNA duplex containing an 8-oxoG/C mismatch, showed that hRad9, hRad1, and hHus1 enhanced the 8-oxoG excision and beta-elimination activities of hOGG1. In addition, the presence of hRad9, hRad1, and hHus1 enhanced the formation of covalently cross-linked hOGG1-8-oxoG/C duplex complexes, as determined by a trapping assay using NaBH(4). A trimeric human 9-1-1 complex was purified from Escherichia coli cell transformed with hRad9, His-fused hRad1, or His-fused hHus1 expressing vectors. It also showed the similar activity to enhance in vitro hOGG1 glycosylase activity, compared with individual human 9-1-1 subunits. Detection of 8-oxoG in HEK293 cells using flow cytometric and spectrofluorometric analysis revealed that over-expression of hOGG1 or human 9-1-1 reduced the formation of 8-oxoG residues following the H(2)O(2) treatment. The highest 8-oxoG reduction was observed in HEK293 cells over-expressing hOGG1 and all the three subunits of human 9-1-1. These indicate that individual human 9-1-1 subunits and human 9-1-1 complex showed almost the same abilities to enhance the in vitro 8-oxoG excision activity of hOGG1, but that the greatest effect to remove 8-oxoG residues in H(2)O(2)-treated cells was derived from the 9-1-1 complex as a whole.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2009 · DNA repair
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    ABSTRACT: Human ribosomal protein S3 (hRpS3) is a small ribosomal subunit showing apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lyase activity and has been suggested to play a role in the cellular DNA-damage response pathway. However, the functional interactions between hRpS3 and other base excision repair (BER) DNA glycosylases have not been reported. We identified, for the first time, the interaction between hRpS3 and human uracil-DNA glycosylase (hUNG) and investigated the functional consequences of this interaction. hRpS3 was shown to interact with hUNG in co-immunoprecipitation assay using transiently transfected HEK293 cells and GST pull-down assay using microbial expression systems. In an assay using a 5'-end-radiolabeled 39-mer oligonucleotide duplex containing a U/G mismatch, hRpS3 dramatically stimulated the uracil-excision activity of hUNG, whereas hRpS3 alone had no cleavage activity. Pre-incubation of hRpS3 with the U/G mismatch containing DNA duplex also increased the hUNG uracil-excision activity; however, hRpS3 did not increase the DNA binding activity of hUNG in a trapping assay of hUNG and the U/G mismatch containing DNA duplex using UV cross-linking. hRpS3 has been suggested to stimulate the uracil-excision activity of hUNG by enhancing its dissociation from AP sites and increasing its turn-over rate. The disruption of hRpS3 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA-hRpS3) transfection reduced the uracil-excision activity preserved in cell extracts, whereas the supplement of purified hRpS3 retained uracil-excision activity. These results strongly suggest that hRpS3 may be involved in the uracil-excision pathway, probably by participating in the DNA repair mechanism to remove uracil generated by the deamination of cytosine in DNA, and by preventing C/G-->T/A transition mutations.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2008 · Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
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    ABSTRACT: In order to study the currently unknown cellular signaling pathways of Ca(v)3.1 T-type Ca(2+) channels (Ca(v)3.1 channels), we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening using intracellular domains of Ca(v)3.1 alpha1 subunit as bait. After screening the human brain cDNA library, several proteins, including RanBPM, were identified as interacting with Ca(v)3.1 channels. RanBPM was found to bind to the cytoplasmic intracellular loop between transmembrane domains I and II of Ca(v)3.1 channels. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, we found that Ca(v)3.1 currents were increased by the expression of RanBPM in HEK293/Ca(v)3.1 cells. We next examined whether RanBPM affected the biophysical properties and plasma membrane expression of Ca(v)3.1 channels. Furthermore, we showed that the PKC activator inhibited Ca(v)3.1 currents, an effect that was abolished by the expression of RanBPM. These results suggest that RanBPM could be a key regulator of Ca(v)3.1 channel-mediated signaling pathways.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2008 · Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

Publication Stats

785 Citations
119.15 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2015
    • Konkuk University
      • • Division of Interdisciplinary Studies
      • • Department of Advanced Technology Fusion (ATF)
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2007
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1997-2003
    • Korea Institute of Science and Technology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea