Louis R Pizano

Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida, United States

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Publications (51)98.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Importance: The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is designed to measure progress, applied medical knowledge, and clinical management; results may determine promotion and fellowship candidacy for general surgery residents. Evaluations are mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education but are administered at the discretion of individual institutions and are not standardized. It is unclear whether the ABSITE and evaluations form a reasonable assessment of resident performance. Objective: To determine whether favorable evaluations are associated with ABSITE performance. Design, setting, and participants: Cross-sectional analysis of preliminary and categorical residents in postgraduate years (PGYs) 1 through 5 training in a single university-based general surgery program from July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2014, who took the ABSITE. Exposures: Evaluation overall performance and subset evaluation performance in the following categories: patient care, technical skills, problem-based learning, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, systems-based practice, and medical knowledge. Main outcomes and measures: Passing the ABSITE (≥30th percentile) and ranking in the top 30% of scores at our institution. Results: The study population comprised residents in PGY 1 (n = 44), PGY 2 (n = 31), PGY 3 (n = 26), PGY 4 (n = 25), and PGY 5 (n = 24) during the 4-year study period (N = 150). Evaluations had less variation than the ABSITE percentile (SD = 5.06 vs 28.82, respectively). Neither annual nor subset evaluation scores were significantly associated with passing the ABSITE (n = 102; for annual evaluation, odds ratio = 0.949; 95% CI, 0.884-1.019; P = .15) or receiving a top 30% score (n = 45; for annual evaluation, odds ratio = 1.036; 95% CI, 0.964-1.113; P = .33). There was no difference in mean evaluation score between those who passed vs failed the ABSITE (mean [SD] evaluation score, 91.77 [5.10] vs 93.04 [4.80], respectively; P = .14) or between those who received a top 30% score vs those who did not (mean [SD] evaluation score, 92.78 [4.83] vs 91.92 [5.11], respectively; P = .33). There was no correlation between annual evaluation score and ABSITE percentile (r2 = 0.014; P = .15), percentage correct unadjusted for PGY level (r2 = 0.019; P = .09), or percentage correct adjusted for PGY level (r2 = 0.429; P = .91). Conclusions and relevance: Favorable evaluations do not correlate with ABSITE scores, nor do they predict passing. Evaluations do not show much discriminatory ability. It is unclear whether individual resident evaluations and ABSITE scores fully assess competency in residents or allow comparisons to be made across programs. Creation of a uniform evaluation system that encompasses the necessary subjective feedback from faculty with the objective measure of the ABSITE is warranted.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · JAMA SURGERY
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    ABSTRACT: Only one previous case report has described scald burns secondary to hair braiding in pediatric patients. The present case study is the largest to date of scald burns as a result of hair braiding in children and adults. Charts of all 1609 female patients seen at a single burn center from 2008 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with scald burns attributed to hair braiding. Demographics, injury severity, injury patterns, and complications were analyzed. Twenty-six patients (1.6%) had scald burns secondary to hair braiding with median TBSA 3%. Eighty-five percent of patients were pediatric with median age 8 years. Injury patterns were as follows: back (62%), shoulder (31%), chest (15%), buttocks (15%), abdomen (12%), arms (12%), neck (12%), and legs (4%). No patients required operative intervention. Three patients were admitted to the hospital. Two patients required time off from school for 6 and 10 days post burn for recovery. Complications included functional limitations (n = 2), hypertrophic scarring (n = 1), cellulitis requiring antibiotics (n = 1), and anxiety requiring medical/psychological therapy (n = 2). This peculiar mechanism of injury not only carries inherent morbidity that includes the risks of functional limitations, infection, and psychological repercussions but also increases usage of resources through hospital admissions and multiple clinic visits. Further work in the form of targeted outreach programs is necessary to educate the community regarding this preventable mechanism of injury.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of the American College of Surgeons

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · International Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Importance: The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is designed to measure progress, applied medical knowledge, and clinical management; results may determine promotion and fellowship candidacy for general surgery residents. Evaluations (EVAL) are mandated by the ACGME but are administered at the discretion of individual institutions, and are not standardized. It is unclear if ABSITE and EVAL form a reasonable assessment of resident performance. Objective: To determine whether favorable evaluations correlate with ABSITE performance. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: A single university-based General Surgery Training Program. Participants: Preliminary and categorical residents in postgraduate year (PGY) 1 -5 who took the ABSITE from 2011-2014 (n=150). Exposure: EVAL overall performance and subset EVAL performance in the following categories: Patient Care, Technical Skills, Problem Based Learning, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism, Systems Based Practice, and Medical Knowledge. Outcome: Primary outcomes included passing (≥ 30th percentile) the ABSITE, and ranking in the top 30% of scores at our institution. Results: The study population was comprised of PGY 1 (n=44), PGY 2 (n=31), PGY 3 (n=26), PGY 4 (n=25), PGY 5 (n=24). EVAL had less variation then ABSITE (Std Dev=5.06 vs 28.82). Neither Annual EVAL nor EVAL subset scores were significantly associated with passing the ABSITE (n=102) or receiving a top 30% score (n=45). There was no difference in mean EVAL score between those who passed vs failed the ABSITE or between those who received a top 30% score vs those who did not. There was no correlation between annual EVAL and ABSITE percentile (r2= 0.014, p=0.148), percent correct unadjusted for PGY level (r2= 0.019, p=0.093), or percent correct adjusted for PGY level (r2= 0.429, p=0.913). Conclusions and Relevance: Favorable evaluations do not correlate with ABSITE scores, nor do they predict passing. Evaluations do not show much discriminatory ability. It is unclear if individual resident evaluations and ABSITE scores fully assess competency in residents, or allow comparisons to be made across programs. Creation of a uniform evaluation system that encompasses the necessary subjective feedback from faculty with the objective measure of the ABSITE is warranted.
    No preview · Conference Paper · May 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Popliteal vascular trauma remains a challenging entity, and carries the greatest risk of limb loss among the lower extremity vascular injuries. Operative management of traumatic popliteal vascular injuries continues to evolve. We aim at describing our experience with such complex injuries, with associated patterns of injury, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, and outcomes. From January 2006 to September 2011, 191 adult trauma patients presented to an urban level I trauma center in Miami, Florida with traumatic lower extremity vascular injuries. Variables collected included age, gender, mechanism of injury, and clinical status at presentation. Surgical data included vessel injury, technical aspects of repair, associated complications and outcomes. Forty-seven (24.6%) patients were diagnosed with traumatic popliteal vascular injuries. Mean age was 38.1 ± 16.1 years, and the majority of patients were males (43 patients, 91.4%). There were 21 (44.7%) penetrating injuries, and 26 (55.3%) blunt injuries. Vascular repair with saphenous venous interposition graft and PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) grafting were performed in 36 (70.7%) and 2 (3.9%) patients, respectively. Blunt popliteal injuries were significantly more associated with major tissue loss, and length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays. The risk for amputation is increased with longer ICU stays and the use of PTFE grafting for vascular repair. The overall mortality rate in this series was 8.5%. Blunt popliteal vascular injuries are associated with increased morbidity compared to penetrating trauma. Early restoration of blood perfusion, frequent use of interposition grafts with autogenous saphenous vein, and liberal use of fasciotomies play important role to achieve acceptable outcomes. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · International Journal of Surgery (London, England)
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    ABSTRACT: Secondary abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) can occur in trauma patients without abdominal injuries. Surgical management of patients presenting with secondary ACS after isolated traumatic lower extremity vascular injury (LEVI) continues to evolve, and associated outcomes remain unknown. From January 2006 to September 2011, 191 adult trauma patients presented to the Ryder Trauma Center, an urban level I trauma center in Miami, Florida with traumatic LEVIs. Among them 10 (5.2 %) patients were diagnosed with secondary ACS. Variables collected included age, gender, mechanism of injury, and clinical status at presentation. Surgical data included vessel injury, technical aspects of repair, associated complications, and outcomes. Mean age was 37.4 ± 18.0 years (range 16-66 years), and the majority of patients were males (8 patients, 80 %). There were 7 (70 %) penetrating injuries (5 gunshot wounds and 2 stab wounds), and 3 blunt injuries with mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) 21.9 ± 14.3 (range 9-50). Surgical management of LEVIs included ligation (4 patients, 40 %), primary repair (1 patient, 10 %), reverse saphenous vein graft (2 patients, 20 %), and PTFE interposition grafting (3 patients, 30 %). The overall mortality rate in this series was 60 %. The association between secondary ACS and lower extremity vascular injuries carries high morbidity and mortality rates. Further research efforts should focus at identifying parameters to accurately determine resuscitation goals, and therefore, prevent such a devastating condition.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity negatively affects outcomes after trauma and surgery; results after burns are more limited and controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of obesity on clinical and economic outcomes after thermal injury. The National Inpatient Sample was queried for adults from 2005-2009 with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes for burn injury. Demographics and clinical outcomes of obese and nonobese cohorts were compared. Univariate and multivariate analysis using logistic regression models were performed. Data are expressed as median (interquartile range) or mean ± standard deviation and compared at P < 0.05. In 14,602 patients, 3.3% were obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2)). The rate of obesity increased significantly by year (P < 0.001). Univariate analysis revealed significant differences between obese and nonobese patients in incidence of wound infection (7.2% versus 5.0%), urinary tract infection (7.2% versus 4.6%), deep vein thrombosis in total body surface area (TBSA) ≥10% (3.1% versus 1.1%), pulmonary embolism in TBSA ≥10% (2.3% versus 0.6%), length of stay [6 d (8) versus 5 d (9)], and hospital costs ($10,122.12 [$18,074.72] versus $7892.07 [$17,191.96]) (all P < 0.05). Death occurred less frequently in the obese group (1.9% versus 4%, P = 0.021). Significant predictors of grouped adverse events (urinary tract infection, wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism) on multivariate analysis include obesity, TBSA ≥20%, age, and black race (all P ≤ 0.05). Obesity is an independent predictor of adverse events after burn injury; however, obesity is associated with decreased mortality. Our findings highlight the potential clinical and economic impact of the obesity epidemic on burn patients nationwide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of Surgical Research
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    ABSTRACT: To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review on the subject of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and hypercoagulability in burn patients. Specific changes in coagulability are reviewed using data from thromboelastography and other techniques. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in burn patients is discussed. The incidence and risk factors associated with VTE in burn patients are then examined, followed by the use of low-molecular-weight heparin thromboprophylaxis and monitoring techniques using antifactor Xa levels. The need for large, prospective trials in burn patients is highlighted, especially in the areas of VTE incidence and safe, effective thromboprophylaxis. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
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    ABSTRACT: Femoral vessel injuries are a familiar injury treated in busy urban trauma centers. The majority of peripheral vascular injuries to the lower extremity occur most commonly to the femoral vessels. The increasing incidence of civilian violence provides an opportunity to perform a comprehensive review and management of these injuries.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · The American surgeon
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Infection is the leading cause of death in burn patients. Historically, this was due to burn wound sepsis but pneumonia has now emerged as the most common source. In light of the increasing incidence of multi-drug-resistant organisms, the description of rare infections is paramount in continuing the fight against deadly pathogens. We aim to describe the second case of non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) reported in a burn patient. Difficulties in diagnosis and management will also be highlighted. Methods: A 70-y-old Caucasian female, with a past medical history for type 2 diabetes mellitus, was transferred to our facility after a house fire. She had sustained a 28% total body surface area (TBSA) flame burn to her neck, torso, and all four extremities. She underwent excision and grafting on hospital day five with multiple subsequent attempts at excision and grafting due to graft loss. On hospital day 14, a tracheostomy was performed. Her hospital course was complicated by ongoing respiratory failure, renal injury, and sepsis. Results: Mycobacterium abscessus was found on blood cultures from central venous catheters and arterial line catheters as well as on tracheal aspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) on hospital day 86. Imaging then revealed multiple pulmonary nodular densities with patchy ground-glass opacities. After multiple adjustments to the antibiotic regimen, tigecycline, clarithromycin, and cefoxitin therapy was started. She remained on this regimen for almost 4 wks. Her other infections included Acinetobacter baumanii treated with tobramycin and colistin, as well as Candida albicans for which she received fluconazole. Ultimately, her clinical state worsened leading to withdrawal of care. Conclusions: Sepsis NTM is rare in burn patients with only one other case described in the English-language literature. Both cases reflect differences in diagnosis and management. This highlights the need to discuss rare infections in an attempt to broaden the clinician's awareness of such pathogens, as well as to collaborate to form a consensus about their management.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Surgical Infections
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    ABSTRACT: There continues to be debate about the routine use of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in burn patients. The concern is routine prophylaxis may lead to adverse events. The debate hinges on the incidence of DVT and its relation to the risk-benefit ratio. This study seeks to estimate the true rate of DVT in burn patients, and to evaluate possible risk factors to its development. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for all patients with age ≥18 years with ICD-9 codes for burn injuries. Demographic data, comorbidities, burn data, length of stay, total charges, procedures, presence of central venous catheter, and mortality were recorded. Patients were classified based on the presence of DVT. Student's t-test, χ test, and logistic regression were performed. 36,638 burn patients were identified. DVT rate was 0.8%. Patients with DVT were older, had longer hospitalizations, more procedures, and higher charges. On logistic regression, black race, TBSA ≥20%, history of previous VTE, blood transfusion, and mechanical ventilation were the significant factors associated with DVT. Patients with DVT were almost twice as likely to die during the admission (P = .011). This is the largest series to date examining the risk factors for DVT in burn patients. DVT developed in approximately 0.8% of burn patients. Black race, TBSA ≥20%, blood transfusions, and mechanical ventilation were associated with approximately 2-fold odds of developing DVT. Identification of these additional risk factors may allow targeted patient prophylaxis. Additionally, patients with DVT incurred higher total charges and longer hospitalization.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Traumatic vascular injuries of the lower extremity in the pediatric population are rare but can result in significant morbidity. We aimed at describing our experience with such complex injuries, with associated patterns of injury, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, and outcomes. Methods: From January 2006 to December 2011, 2,844 pediatric trauma patients presented at the Ryder Trauma Center, an urban Level I trauma center in Miami, Florida. Among them, 18 patients (0.6%) were evaluated for lower extremity traumatic vascular injuries. Variables collected included age, sex, mechanism of injury, and clinical status at presentation. Surgical data included vessel injury, technical aspects of repair, associated complications, and outcomes. Results: Mean (SD) age was ± 14.7 (2.6) years (range, 6-17 years), with 17 males (94.4%). Of the 18 traumatic pediatric patients, 32 vascular injuries were identified. All arterial injuries underwent definitive operative repair. Primary repair was performed in two patients (11.1%), six (33.3%) required saphenous vein interposition grafting as initial procedure, and eight (44.4%) underwent polytetrafluoroethylene grafting. Ligation was performed in major venous injuries and deep profunda branches. The overall survival in this series was 94.4%. Conclusion: Peripheral vascular injuries of the lower extremity in the pediatric population can result in acceptable outcomes if managed early and aggressively. Surgical principles of vascular surgery are similar to those applied to an adult. We recommend that these injuries should be managed in a tertiary specialized center with a multidisciplinary team of trauma surgeons, and pediatricians, which can potentially decrease morbidity and mortality. Level of Evidence: Epidemiologic study, level III. © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is an immune-mediated dermatologic condition that is characterized by a widespread eruption of sterile, subcorneal pustules. Cases of GPP may present to the burn intensive care unit (ICU), and they may be confused with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) due to the generalized erythema and desquamation. GPP often benefits from admission to an ICU for management of fluid and electrolyte imbalances and for complications such as pneumonitis, renal dysfunction and sepsis. We present the case of a 42 year-old man who was transferred to the burn unit for presumed TEN where he was diagnosed with GPP and successfully treated with intravenous cyclosporine and supportive care. Our objective is to increase awareness of this condition in the critical care community, discuss clinical and laboratory findings, and to review the treatment guidelines published by the National Psoriasis Foundation in August 2012. We also discuss the latest reports utilizing biological response modifying drugs.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Burns: journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
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    ABSTRACT: Our institution continued to experience a hyperendemic situation with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii despite a bundle of interventions. We aim to describe the effect of the subsequent implementation of electronic dissemination of the weekly findings of a bundle of interventions. This was a quasiexperimental study performed at a 1,500-bed, public, teaching hospital. From January 2011 to March 2012, weekly electronic communications were sent to the hospital leadership and intensive care units (ICUs). These communications aimed to describe, interpret, and package the findings of the previous week's active surveillance cultures, environmental cultures, environmental disinfection, and hand cultures. Additionally, action plans based on these findings were shared with recipients. During 42 months and 1,103,900 patient-days, we detected 438 new acquisitions of carbapenem-resistant A baumannii. Hospital wide, the rate of acquisition decreased from 5.13 ± 0.39 to 1.93 ± 0.23 per 10,000 patient-days, during the baseline and postintervention periods, respectively (P < .0001). This effect was also observed in the medical and trauma ICUs, with decreased rates from 67.15 ± 10.56 to 17.4 ± 4.6 (P < .0001) and from 55.9 ± 8.95 to 14.71 ± 4.45 (P = .0004), respectively. Weekly and systematic dissemination of the findings of a bundle of interventions was successful in decreasing the rates of carbapenem-resistant A baumannii across a large public hospital.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · American journal of infection control
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to determine the association between environmental exposure to carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and the subsequent risk of acquiring this organism. Patients exposed to a contaminated hospital environment had 2.77 times the risk of acquiring carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii than did unexposed patients (relative risk, 2.77 [95% confidence interval, 1.50-5.13]; P = .002).
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
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    ABSTRACT: To characterize the descriptive and molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in our hospital. Longitudinal analysis of electronic microbiology laboratory records and isolates. A 1,500 bed public teaching hospital in the Miami area. Consecutive patients with A. baumannii from January 1994 to December 2011. None MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Data on all A. baumannii isolates were clustered at the patient level, and the first isolate per single patient was determined. Yearly trends were analyzed based on carbapenem susceptibilities and originating units for all first isolates and first blood isolates per unique patient. Additionally, carbapenem nonsusceptible isolates frozen in the microbiology laboratory since 1998 were retrieved and evaluated using polymerase chain reaction and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA techniques. A total of 9,334 A. baumannii isolates were detected, of which 4,484 isolates (48%) were identified as first positive isolates per unique patient. Most of the burden of disease was located in the ICUs (odds ratio, 2.64 [95% CI, 2.17-3.22]; p < 0.0001) and in the adult wards (odds ratio, 3.867 [95% CI, 2.71-5.52]; p < 0.0001). Respiratory specimens constituted the most frequent source (49%; odds ratio, 1.619 [95% CI, 1.391-1.884]; p < 0.0001). Of the 4,484 first isolates, 846 isolates (18.9%) were carbapenem nonsusceptible and 3,638 isolates (81.1%) were carbapenem susceptible. Over the years, the number of carbapenem nonsusceptible isolates increased, whereas the number of carbapenem susceptible decreased (p < 0.0001). The trauma ICU had the highest burden of carbapenem nonsusceptible first isolates (205 of 846; 24.2%). Seven clones were discovered among 144 carbapenem nonsusceptible isolates; one of these clones was found from 1999 to 2005. OXA-23 and OXA-40 were identified in 96 and 13 isolates, respectively. One isolate harbored a novel CTX-M-115 enzyme. This constitutes the largest experience with A. baumannii reported to date from a single center. Half of all isolates were respiratory specimens and were from adult ICUs, especially trauma. Even though this was a polyclonal process, a single clone was identified in the hospital through a 6-year span.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Critical care medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The American Burn Association recommends that patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis-Stevens Johnson syndrome (TEN-SJS) or burn inhalation injuries would benefit from admission or transfer to a burn center (BC). This study examines to what extent those criteria are observed within a regional burn network. Hospital discharge data from 2000 to 2010 was obtained for all hospitals within the South Florida regional burn network. Patients with International Classification of Disease-9th revision discharge diagnoses for TEN-SJS or burn inhalation injury and their triage destination were compared using burn triage referral criteria to determine whether the patients were triaged differently from American Burn Association recommendations. Two hundred ninety-nine TEN-SJS and 131 inhalation injuries were admitted to all South Florida hospitals. Only 25 (8.4%) of TEN-SJS and 27 (21%) of inhalation injuries were admitted to the BC. BC patients had greater length of stay (TEN-SJS 22 vs 10 days; inhalation 13 vs 7) and were more likely to be funded by charity or be self-paid (TEN-SJS 24 vs 9.5%, P = .025; inhalation 44 vs 14%, P < .001), but less likely to hold some form of private or government insurance (TEN-SJS 72 vs 88%, P = .02; inhalation 48 vs 81%, P = .006). TEN-SJS BC patients were more frequently discharged home for self-care (76 vs 50%, P = .006). Non-BC patients were more often discharged to other healthcare facilities (28 vs 0% TEN-SJS, 20 vs 7.4% inhalation). Nonrecommended triage may occur in more than 3 of 4 of the TEN-SJS and inhalation injury patients within our burn network. Unfamiliarity with triage criteria, patient insurance status, and overcoding may play a role. Further studies should fully characterize the problem and implement education or incentives to encourage more appropriate triage.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association
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    ABSTRACT: Hypercoagulability is a homeostatic response to trauma, but relatively little information is available about coagulation changes after burn injury. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that burn patients are hypercoagulable at admission and/or during recovery. A prospective observational trial was conducted at an American Burn Association verified Burn Center. Thromboelastography (TEG) was performed on blood drawn from indwelling catheters upon admission and weekly for those who remained hospitalized. Routine and special coagulation tests were performed on stored samples. Data are expressed as median (interquartile range). Twenty-four patients (88% male) were enrolled, with a median age of 49 (20) years and a median total body surface area burn of 29% (23%); 21 experienced thermal burns (4 inhalational injuries), and 3 had electrical burns. There were no significant differences in TEG or coagulation assays between patients with thermal versus electrical burn injury, but there were significant differences between men versus women and between those with or without inhalational injury. Sixteen patients had repeat samples 1 week after intensive care unit admission. The repeat TEG was more hypercoagulable (all p < 0.05). Fibrinogen and natural anticoagulation proteins (protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III) were also increased (all p < 0.05). Two patients (8%) developed venous thromboembolism (VTE); TEG reaction time, fibrinogen, and partial thromboplastin time were decreased (all p < 0.05) at admission compared with those with no VTE. All changes occurred despite pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. There was no significant correlation between TEG and total body surface area or between TEG and fluid balance. In general, burn patients have normal coagulation parameters at admission but become hypercoagulable during recovery. However, those who are hypercoagulable at admission may have an increased risk of VTE. Additional monitoring and/or thromboprophylaxis may be indicated. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:: To establish the presence of air contamination with Acinetobacter baumannii in the trauma ICU. DESIGN:: Point prevalence microbiological surveillances. SETTINGS:: A 1,500-bed public teaching hospital in the Miami metro area. PATIENTS:: Trauma ICU patients. MEASUREMENTS:: Pulsed field electrophoresis was performed on environmental and clinical isolates to determine the association of any isolates from the air with clinical isolates. MAIN RESULTS:: Out of 53 patient areas cultured, 12 (22.6%) had their air positive for A. baumannii. The presence of an A. baumannii-positive patient (underneath the plate) was associated with positive air cultures for A. baumannii (11 of 21 [52.4%] vs 0 of 25 [0%]; p < 0.0001). However, we were not able to find differences in air contamination based on the presence of A. baumannii in respiratory secretions vs absence (p = 1.0). Air and clinical isolates were found to be clonally related. CONCLUSIONS:: Aerosolization of A. baumannii in the ICUs is a concern, and its role in the transmission of this organism among patients should be further clarified.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Critical care medicine

Publication Stats

308 Citations
98.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Jackson Memorial Hospital
      Miami, Florida, United States
  • 2004-2015
    • University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
      • • Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care
      • • Department of Surgery
      Miami, Florida, United States
  • 2003-2015
    • University of Miami
      • Department of Surgery
      كورال غيبلز، فلوريدا, Florida, United States
  • 2014
    • Intelligent Hearing Systems, Miami, FL USA
      Miami, Florida, United States