Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (36)178.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate interictal, circulating sphingolipids in women migraineurs. Methods: In the fasting state, serum samples were obtained pain-free from 88 women with episodic migraine (EM; n = 52) and from controls (n = 36). Sphingolipids were detected and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry using multiple reaction monitoring. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between serum sphingolipids and EM odds. A recursive partitioning decision tree based on the serum concentrations of 10 sphingolipids was used to determine the presence or absence of EM in a subset of participants. Results: Total ceramide (EM 6,502.9 ng/mL vs controls 10,518.5 ng/mL; p < 0.0001) and dihydroceramide (EM 39.3 ng/mL vs controls 63.1 ng/mL; p < 0.0001) levels were decreased in those with EM as compared with controls. Using multivariate logistic regression, each SD increase in total ceramide (odds ratio [OR] 0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02, 0.22; p < 0.001) and total dihydroceramide (OR 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.21; p < 0.001) levels was associated with more than 92% reduced odds of migraine. Although crude sphingomyelin levels were not different in EM compared with controls, after adjustments, every SD increase in the sphingomyelin species C18:0 (OR 4.28; 95% CI: 1.87, 9.81; p = 0.001) and C18:1 (OR 2.93; 95% CI: 1.55, 5.54; p = 0.001) was associated with an increased odds of migraine. Recursive portioning models correctly classified 14 of 14 randomly selected participants as EM or control. Conclusion: These results suggest that sphingolipid metabolism is altered in women with EM and that serum sphingolipid panels may have potential to differentiate EM presence or absence. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that serum sphingolipid panels accurately distinguish women with migraine from women without migraine.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Neurology
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    J.E. Rico · V.V.R. Bandaru · J.M. Dorskind · N.J. Haughey · J.W. McFadden
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    ABSTRACT: Insulin resistance is a homeorhetic adaptation to parturition in dairy cows transitioning from late pregnancy to early lactation. An increase in prepartum adiposity can predispose periparturient cows to greater lipolysis and insulin resistance, thus increasing the risk for metabolic disease. Mechanisms mediating the development of insulin resistance in overweight peripartal dairy cows may depend on ceramide metabolism. The sphingolipid ceramide accumulates in plasma and tissues of overweight monogastric animals, and facilitates saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Considering this evidence, we hypothesized that plasma ceramides would be elevated in periparturient dairy cattle and that these sphingolipids would correlate with the magnitude of lipolysis and insulin resistance. To test our central hypothesis, multiparous Holstein cows were allocated into 2 groups according to their body condition score (BCS) at d -30 prepartum: lean (BCS <3.0; n = 10) or overweight (BCS >4.0; n = 11). Blood samples were collected at d -45, -30, -15, and -7, relative to expected parturition, and at d 4 postpartum. Plasma glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations were measured, and insulin sensitivity was estimated. The concentrations of individual plasma ceramide and glycosylated ceramide were determined using liquid chromatography-based mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that greater adiposity was associated with a greater loss in body condition during late pregnancy. Overweight cows had greater circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, and NEFA, and lower insulin sensitivity relative to lean cows. We detected 30 different sphingolipids across 6 lipid classes with acyl chains ranging from 16 to 26 carbons. The most abundant plasma sphingolipids detected were C24:0-ceramide, C24:0-monohexosylceramide, and C16:0-lactosylceramide. Plasma concentrations of total ceramide and monohexosylceramide increased as lactation approached, and saturated ceramide and monohexosylceramide were elevated in cows with greater adiposity relative to those with a lean phenotype. Plasma ceramides (e.g., C24:0-ceramide) were positively correlated with plasma NEFA and inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity. Our data demonstrate a remodeled plasma sphingolipidome in dairy cows transitioning from late pregnancy to lactation characterized by a concomitant increase in plasma ceramides with the development of peripartal insulin resistance. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Dairy Science
  • Michelle M Mielke · Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru · Dingfen Han · Yang An · Susan M Resnick · Luigi Ferrucci · Norman J Haughey
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    ABSTRACT: It has been increasingly recognized at the basic science level that perturbations in ceramide metabolism are associated with the development and progression of many age-related diseases. However, the translation of this work to the clinic has lagged behind. Understanding the factors longitudinally associated with plasma ceramides and dihydroceramides (DHCer) at the population level and how these lipid levels change with age, and by sex, is important for the clinical development of future therapeutics and biomarkers focused on ceramide metabolism. We, therefore, examined factors cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with plasma concentrations of ceramides and DHCer among Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging participants (n = 992; 3960 total samples), aged 55 years and older, with plasma at a mean of 4.1 visits (range 2-6). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess the relationships between plasma ceramide and DHCer species and demographics, diseases, medications, and lifestyle factors. Women had higher plasma concentrations of most ceramide and DHCer species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. Ceramides and DHCer were more associated with waist-hip ratio than body mass index. Plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, prediabetes, and diabetes were associated with ceramides and DHCer, but the relationship showed specificity to the acyl chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate the importance of examining the individual species of ceramides and DHCer, and of establishing whether intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes occur in synchrony to disease onset and progression. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Aging cell

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Ceramide is a bioactive lipid that plays an important role in stress responses leading to apoptosis, cell growth arrest and differentiation. Ceramide production is due in part to sphingomyelin hydrolysis by sphingomyelinases. In brain, neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) is expressed in neurons and increases in its activity and expression have been associated with pro-inflammatory conditions observed in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) patients. Increased nSMase2 activity translates into higher ceramide levels and neuronal cell death, which can be prevented by chemical or genetic inhibition of nSMase2 activity or expression. However, to date, there are no soluble, specific and potent small molecule inhibitor tool compounds for in vivo studies or as a starting point for medicinal chemistry optimization. Moreover, the majority of the known inhibitors were identified using bacterial, bovine or rat nSMase2. In an attempt to identify new inhibitor scaffolds, two activity assays were optimized as screening platform using the recombinant human enzyme. First, active hits were identified using a fluorescence-based high throughput compatible assay. Then, hits were confirmed using a 14C sphingomyelin-based direct activity assay. Pharmacologically active compounds and approved drugs were screened using this strategy which led to the identification of cambinol as a novel uncompetitive nSMase2 inhibitor (Ki = 7 μM). The inhibitory activity of cambinol for nSMase2 was approximately 10-fold more potent than for its previously known target, silence information regulator 1 and 2 (SIRT1/2). Cambinol decreased tumor necrosis factor-α or interleukin-1 β-induced increases of ceramide and cell death in primary neurons. A preliminary study of cambinol structure and activity allowed the identification of the main structural features required for nSMase2 inhibition. Cambinol and its analogs may be useful as nSMase2 inhibitor tool compounds to prevent ceramide-dependent neurodegeneration.
    Preview · Article · May 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru · Norman J Haughey
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    ABSTRACT: Background Cholesterol metabolism is important for the maintenance of myelin and neuronal membranes in the central nervous system. Blood concentrations of the brain specific cholesterol metabolite 24S-hydroxysterol to the peripheral metabolite 27-hydroxycholesterol may be useful surrogate markers for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer¿s disease, Huntington¿s disease, HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, and Multiple Sclerosis. However, current methods to isolate hydroxycholesterols are labor intensive, prone to produce variable extraction efficiencies and do not discriminate between free and esterfied forms of hydroxycholesterols. Since free hydroxycholesterols are the biologically active form of these sterols, separating free from esterfied forms may provide a sensitive measure to identify disease-associated differences in brain sterol metabolism.Methods Here we report simple liquid-liquid extraction method coupled with high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry that is a sensitive, specific and robust method to detect and quantify levels of free 24S-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydrosxycholesterol in serum.ResultsWe found that average human serum concentrations were 12.3¿±¿4.79 ng/ml for free 24(s)-hydroxycholesterol and 17.7¿±¿8.5 ng/ml for 27-hydroxycholesterol.Conclusions Plasma measurements of these biologically active oxysterols may be useful surrogate measures for brain health in a variety of neurodegenerative conditions.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2014 · BMC Neuroscience
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    ABSTRACT: Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Aging cell
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes major disruption to peripheral organ innervation and regulation. However, relatively little work has investigated these post-SCI systemic changes despite considerable evidence that multiple organ system dysfunction contributes to chronic impairments in health. Since metabolic dysfunction is common after SCI, and the liver is a pivotal site for metabolic homeostasis, we sought to determine if liver pathology occurs as a result of SCI in a rat spinal contusion model. Histologic evidence showed excess lipid accumulation in the liver for at least 21d post-injury after cervical or mid-thoracic SCI. Lipidomic analysis revealed an acute increase in hepatic ceramides as well as chronically elevated lactosylceramide. Post-SCI hepatic changes also included increased pro-inflammatory gene expression, including IL-1α, IL-1β, CCL2, and TNFα mRNA. These were coincident with increased CD68+ macrophages in the liver through 21d post-injury. Serum alanine transaminase, used clinically to detect liver damage, was significantly increased at 21d post-injury, suggesting that early metabolic and inflammatory damage preceded overt liver pathology. Surprisingly, liver inflammation was even detected after lumbar SCI. Collectively, these results suggest that SCI produces chronic liver injury with symptoms strikingly similar to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (fatty liver disease). These clinically significant hepatic changes after SCI are known to contribute to systemic inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, all of which are more prevalent in individuals with SCI. Targeting acute and prolonged hepatic pathology may improve recovery and reduce long-term complications following SCI.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Neurotrauma
  • Mihyun Bae · Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru · Neha Patel · Norman J. Haughey
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    ABSTRACT: Binge drinking is a common form of alcohol abuse that involves repeated rounds of intoxication followed by withdrawal. The episodic effects of binge drinking and withdrawal on brain resident cells are thought to contribute to neural remodeling and neurological damage. However, the molecular mechanisms for these neurodegenerative effects are not understood. Ethanol (EtOH) regulates the metabolism of ceramide, a highly bioactive lipid that is enriched in brain. We used a mouse model of binge drinking to determine the effects of EtOH intoxication and withdrawal on brain ceramide metabolism. Intoxication and acute alcohol withdrawal were each associated with distinct changes in ceramide regulatory genes and metabolic products. EtOH intoxication was accompanied by decreased concentrations of multiple ceramides, coincident with reductions in the expression of enzymes involved in the production of ceramides, and increased expression of ceramide degrading enzymes. EtOH withdrawal was associated with specific increases in ceramide C16:0, C18:0 and C20:0 and increased expression of enzymes involved with ceramide production. These data suggest that EtOH intoxication may evoke a ceramide phenotype that is neuroprotective, while EtOH withdrawal results in a metabolic shift that increases the production of potentially toxic ceramide species.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Neurochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Axonal damage is a prominent cause of disability and yet its pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Using a xenogeneic system, here we define the bioenergetic changes induced in rat neurons by exposure to cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with multiple sclerosis compared to control subjects. A first discovery cohort of cerebrospinal fluid from 13 patients with multiple sclerosis and 10 control subjects showed that acute exposure to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis induced oxidative stress and decreased expression of neuroprotective genes, while increasing expression of genes involved in lipid signalling and in the response to oxidative stress. Protracted exposure of neurons to stress led to neurotoxicity and bioenergetics failure after cerebrospinal fluid exposure and positively correlated with the levels of neurofilament light chain. These findings were validated using a second independent cohort of cerebrospinal fluid samples (eight patients with multiple sclerosis and eight control subjects), collected at a different centre. The toxic effect of cerebrospinal fluid on neurons was not attributable to differences in IgG content, glucose, lactate or glutamate levels or differences in cytokine levels. A lipidomic profiling approach led to the identification of increased levels of ceramide C16:0 and C24:0 in the cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis. Exposure of cultured neurons to micelles composed of these ceramide species was sufficient to recapitulate the bioenergetic dysfunction and oxidative damage induced by exposure to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with multiple sclerosis. Therefore, our data suggest that C16:0 and C24:0 ceramides are enriched in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis and are sufficient to induce neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and axonal damage.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Brain
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with verbal memory decline, although deterioration may be mitigated in individuals undertaking exercise interventions. Ceramide sphingolipids, suggested to play a role in pathological neurodegeneration, have been associated with the development and progression of CAD but their relationship with cognitive response to exercise has not been assessed. In this study, concentrations of very long chain ceramides (C22:0 and C24:0) were assessed as predictors of changes in verbal memory performance over 1 year in subjects with CAD undertaking cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Verbal memory was measured using the California Verbal Learning Test 2nd Ed. (CVLT-II), from which Z-scores were calculated based on age, gender and education matched norms. Baseline plasma C22:0 and C24:0 ceramide concentrations were measured from fasting blood samples using high performance liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Repeated measures general linear models were used to determine the association between baseline plasma ceramides and the change in verbal memory performance over 1 year of CR controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). In patients with CAD (n = 33, mean age = 62 +/- 9 years, 84.8% male, years of education = 17 +/- 3 years), higher baseline plasma C22:0 (F1, 29 = 5.30, p = 0.03) and C24:0 (F1, 29 = 4.04, p = 0.05) concentrations significantly predicted less improvement in verbal memory performance over 1 year of CR controlling for age and BMI. Plasma ceramide concentrations should be further examined as potential predictors of cognitive response to exercise and worse cognitive outcomes in patients with CAD.Trial registration: NCT01625754.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · BMC Geriatrics
  • Norman J Haughey · Xiaomao Zhu · Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru
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    ABSTRACT: The development and application of biomarkers to neurodegenerative diseases has become increasingly important in clinical practice and therapeutic trials. While substantial progress has been made at the basic science level in understanding the pathophysiology of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), there are significant limitations in our current ability to predict the onset or trajectory of disease, and to accurately determine the effects of therapeutic interventions. Thus, the development of objective biomarkers is critical to further our understanding and treatment of HAND. In recent years, biomarker discovery efforts have largely been driven forward through the implementation of multiple "omics" approaches that include (but are not restricted to): Lipidomics, proteomics, metabolomics, genomics, transcriptomics, and advances in brain imaging approaches such as functional connectomics. In this paper we summarize our progress to date on lipidomic approaches to biomarker discovery, discuss how these data have influenced basic research on the neuropathology of HAND, and implications for the development of therapeutics that target metabolic pathways involved in lipid handling.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: In this multicenter cohort study, we sought to identify prognostic and associative metabolic indicators for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). A quantitative lipidomic analysis was conducted on 524 longitudinal CSF samples collected from 7 different performance sites across the mainland United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Subjects included HIV-infected individuals with longitudinal clinical and cognitive testing data and cognitively normal HIV-negative healthy controls. At baseline, HIV+ subjects could be differentiated from HIV- controls by reductions in a single ceramide species and increases in multiple forms of cholesterol. Perturbations in cholesterol metabolism and ceramide were influenced by combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) use. There were no cross-sectional baseline differences in any lipid metabolite when HIV+ subjects were grouped according to cognitive status. However, a single sphingolipid metabolite and reduced levels of esterified cholesterols were prognostic indicators of incident cognitive decline. Longitudinal patterns of these disturbances in sphingolipid and sterol metabolism suggest that a progressive disorder of lipid metabolism that is similar to disorders of lipid storage may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. These findings suggest that HIV infection and cART are independently associated with a CNS metabolic disturbance, identify surrogate markers that are prognostic for cognitive decline, and implicate a lipid storage-like disorder in the progression of HAND.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Despite wide spread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in developed countries, approximately half of HIV-infected patients will develop impairments in cognitive function. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction can be precipitated by HIV-infection of macrophages by mechanisms that involve alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV-infection of macrophages is known to increase the release of soluble neurotoxins. However, the composition of products released from infected macrophages is complex and not fully known. In this study we provide evidence that ATP and other immuno-/neuromodulatory nucleotides are exported from HIV-infected macrophages and modify neuronal structure. Supernatants collected from HIV-infected macrophages (HIV/MDM) contained large amounts of ATP, ADP, AMP and small amounts of adenosine, in addition to glutamate. Dilutions of these supernatants that were sub-threshold for glutamate receptor activation evoked rapid calcium flux in neurons that were completely inhibited by the enzymatic degradation of ATP, or by blockade of calcium permeable purinergic receptors. Applications of these highly diluted HIV/MDM onto neuronal cultures increased the amount of extracellular glutamate by mechanisms dependent on purinergic receptor activation, and downregulated spine density on neurons by mechanisms dependent on purinergic and glutamate receptor activation. We conclude from these data that ATP released from HIV-infected macrophages downregulates dendritic spine density on neurons by a mechanism that involves purinergic receptor mediated modulation of glutamatergic tone. These data suggest that neuronal function may be depressed in HIV infected individuals by mechanisms that involve macrophage release of ATP that triggers secondary effects on glutamate handling.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: In a xenograft model wherein, live renal cancer cells were implanted under the kidney capsule in mice, revealed a 30-fold increase in tumor volume over a period of 26 days and this was accompanied with a 32-fold increase in the level of lactosylceramide (LacCer). Mice fed D- threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP), an inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase and lactosylceramide synthase (LCS: β-1,4-GalT-V), showed marked reduction in tumor volume. This was accompanied by a decrease in the mass of lactosylceramide and an increase in glucosylceramide (GlcCer) level. Mechanistic studies revealed that D-PDMP inhibited cell proliferation and angiogenesis by inhibiting p44MAPK, p-AKT-1 pathway and mammalian target for rapamycin (mTOR). By linking glycosphingolipid synthesis with tumor growth, renal cancer progression and regression can be evaluated. Thus inhibiting glycosphingolipid synthesis can be a bonafide target to prevent the progression of other types of cancer.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    Gijs Kooij · Jack van Horssen · Veera Venkata Ratnam Bandaru · Norman J Haughey · Helga E de Vries
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    ABSTRACT: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are highly expressed by brain endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These efflux pumps play an important role in maintaining brain homeostasis as they actively hinder the entry of unwanted blood-derived compounds into the central nervous system (CNS). Consequently, their high activity at the BBB has been a major hurdle for the treatment of several brain diseases, as they prevent numerous drugs to reach their site of action within the brain. Importantly, recent data indicate that endogenous substrates for ABC transporters may include inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive lipids, suggesting a potential role for ABC transporters in immunological responses, and more specifically in inflammatory brain disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we will give a comprehensive overview of recent findings that illustrate this novel role for ABC transporters in neuro-inflammatory processes. Moreover, we will provide first insights into underlying mechanisms and focus on the importance for bioactive lipids, in particular platelet-activating factor, herein. A thorough understanding of these events may form the basis for the development for selective treatment modalities to dampen the neuro-inflammatory attack in MS and thereby reducing tissue damage.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Frontiers in Pharmacology

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Several proteins that play key roles in cholesterol synthesis, regulation, trafficking and signaling are united by sharing the phylogenetically conserved 'sterol-sensing domain' (SSD). The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma possesses at least one gene coding for a protein containing the canonical SSD. We investigated the role of this protein to provide information on lipid regulatory mechanisms in the parasite. The protein sequence predicts an uncharacterized Niemann-Pick, type C1-related protein (NPC1) with significant identity to human NPC1, and it contains many residues implicated in human NPC disease. We named this NPC1-related protein, TgNCR1. Mammalian NPC1 localizes to endo-lysosomes and promotes the movement of sterols and sphingolipids across the membranes of these organelles. Miscoding patient mutations in NPC1 cause overloading of these lipids in endo-lysosomes. TgNCR1, however, lacks endosomal targeting signals, and localizes to flattened vesicles beneath the plasma membrane of Toxoplasma. When expressed in mammalian NPC1 mutant cells and properly addressed to endo-lysosomes, TgNCR1 restores cholesterol and GM1 clearance from these organelles. To clarify the role of TgNCR1 in the parasite, we genetically disrupted NCR1; mutant parasites were viable. Quantitative lipidomic analyses on the ΔNCR1 strain reveal normal cholesterol levels but an overaccumulation of several species of cholesteryl esters, sphingomyelins and ceramides. ΔNCR1 parasites are also characterized by abundant storage lipid bodies and long membranous tubules derived from their parasitophorous vacuoles. Interestingly, these mutants can generate multiple daughters per single mother cell at high frequencies, allowing fast replication in vitro, and they are slightly more virulent in mice than the parental strain. These data suggest that the ΔNCR1 strain has lost the ability to control the intracellular levels of several lipids, which subsequently results in the stimulation of lipid storage, membrane biosynthesis and parasite division. Based on these observations, we ascribe a role for TgNCR1 in lipid homeostasis in Toxoplasma.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · PLoS Pathogens
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    ABSTRACT: Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Although the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for this effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. gp120 enlarged and stabilized the structure of lipid microdomains on dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that accelerated the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by a PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced by threefold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from accelerating the surface localization of NMDA receptors. Disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains after gp120 treatments restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV infection by interfering with NMDA receptor trafficking.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2011 · The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
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    ABSTRACT: Plasma sphingolipids have been shown to predict cognitive impairment and hippocampal volume loss, but there is little research in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we sought to determine whether plasma ceramides, dihydroceramides (DHCer), sphingomyelins (SM), or dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM) levels and ratios of SM/ceramide or DHSM/DHCer were predictive of progression in AD. Probable AD patients (n = 120) were enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Disorders Center at Baylor College of Medicine. Plasma sphingolipids were assessed using ESI/MS/MS. Linear mixed effects models were used to examine the relation between baseline plasma sphingolipid levels and cross-sectional and longitudinal performance on the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog), and Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-Sum). Participants were followed a mean of 4.2 visits and 2.3 years. There were no cross-sectional associations. In longitudinal analyses, high levels of DHCer and ceramide were associated with greater progression, but findings did not reach significance (p > 0.05). In contrast, higher plasma levels of SM, DHSM, SM/ceramide, and DHSM/DHCer ratios were associated with less progression on the MMSE and ADAS-Cog; the ratios were the strongest predictors of clinical progression. Compared to the lowest tertiles, the highest tertiles of DHSM/DHCer and SM/ceramide ratios declined 1.35 points (p = 0.001) and 1.19 (p = 0.004) points less per year on the MMSE and increased 3.18 (p = 0.001) and 2.42 (p = 0.016) points less per year on the ADAS-Cog. These results suggest that increased SM/ceramide and DHSM/DHCer ratios dose-dependently predict slower progression among AD patients and may be sensitive blood-based biomarkers for clinical progression.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD