Xianghua Fang

Xuanwu hospital, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (40)126.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess whether body mass index (BMI) modifies the associations of lipids with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods: In the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration, total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured for 333,297, 71,777 and 84,015 participants, respectively. All participants had measured BMI, categorized into underweight, normal, high-normal, overweight and obese, using standard definitions. For each BMI subgroup the effects of lipids on CHD were estimated per 1 standard deviation (SD) increase using Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by study and sex, adjusted for age and smoking. They were compared across the BMI groups, testing for interactions. Results: In the analyses for TC, HDLC and TG, there were 3121, 714 and 808 CHD events during a mean follow-up of 6.7 years. The risk of CHD increased monotonically with increasing TC and decreasing HDLC in all BMI subgroups without evidence of heterogeneity (p for interaction > 0.4). In contrast, the hazard ratio for CHD for a one SD increase in log-transformed TG increased from 1.07 (95%CI 0.72-1.59) in underweight, 1.26 (1.10-1.44) in normal weight, 1.27 (1.08-1.49) in high-normal weight, 1.37 (1.22-1.55) in overweight, to 1.61(1.30-1.99) in obesity (p = 0.01 for interaction trend). These associations were attenuated (p = 0.07 for interaction) but remained significant in the overweight and obese after further adjustment for TC and HDLC. Conclusions: Greater excess body weight exacerbated the effects of TG, but not TC or HDLC, on CHD, suggesting that additional effort is required to reduce TG in the overweight and obese.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2016
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The pieces of evidence regarding whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a better predictor than its individual components, especially diabetes, for recurrent stroke are limited. This study aimed to examine these associations. Methods: A total of 1087 ischemic stroke patients were recruited consecutively from 2003 to 2004. They were followed up until the end of 2008. Baseline clinical and laboratory characteristics and new stroke event during follow-up were recorded. MetS was defined by the definition issued by the Chinese Medical Association/Chinese Diabetes Society. Results: One hundred forty-three new stroke cases were recorded. After adjusting for baseline age, gender, education, marriage status, subtype stroke, length of index stroke to baseline assessment, history of cardiac diseases, smoking status, drinking status, clinics, aspirin treatment, and fibrinogen by Cox regression models, the risk of recurrent stroke was 43% higher in MetS patients than in non-MetS patients (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.01). The strength of this association is weaker than MetS individual components such as elevated glycemia (adjusted HR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.26-2.52), elevated blood pressure (adjusted HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.11-3.30), or low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (adjusted HR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.08-2.51). Compared with the group with neither MetS nor diabetes, the adjusted risk of recurrent stroke was highest in the group with diabetes (HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.66-4.63), followed by those with both MetS and diabetes (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.94). The risk of recurrent stroke in patients with MetS in the absence of diabetes was similar to those with neither. Conclusion: MetS is not superior to its individual components in predicting future recurrent stroke in patients who experience mild-to-moderate ischemic stroke.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases: the official journal of National Stroke Association
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the association between kidney dysfunction and carotid atherosclerosis in community-based older adults. This study consisted of 1257 participants, aged 55 years and older and free of cardiovascular disease. Kidney dysfunction was classified as mild, moderate, and severe (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 45-59, 30-44, and <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively). We found that the mean common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) progressively increased with decrement in kidney function (P < .001). Even mild kidney dysfunction was significantly associated with CCA-IMT thickening (CCA-IMT ≥1.0 mm; odds ratio [OR] 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-1.99) compared to normal kidney function. A significantly increased presence of heterogeneous plaque was observed in relation to decreased kidney function (P for trend = .011), that is, even a mild kidney dysfunction was a potential independent risk factor for heterogeneous plaque (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.04-1.98). Mild kidney dysfunction may be a predictor of early or accelerated carotid atherosclerosis in older adults. © The Author(s) 2015.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Angiology
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    ABSTRACT: In Western countries, lower socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and premature mortality. These associations may plausibly differ in Asian populations, but data are scarce and direct comparisons between the two regions are lacking. We, thus, aimed to compare such associations between Asian and Western populations in a large collaborative study, using the highest level of education attained as our measure of social status. Cohort studies in general populations conducted in Asia or Australasia. 303 036 people (71% from Asia) from 24 studies in the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration. Studies had to have a prospective cohort study design, have accumulated at least 5000 person-years of follow-up, recorded date of birth (or age), sex and blood pressure at baseline and date of, or age at, death during follow-up. We used Cox regression models to estimate relationships between educational attainment and CVD (fatal or non-fatal), as well as all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. During more than two million person-years of follow-up, 11 065 deaths (3655 from CVD and 4313 from cancer) and 1809 CVD non-fatal events were recorded. Adjusting for classical CVD risk factors and alcohol drinking, hazard ratios (95% CIs) for primary relative to tertiary education in Asia (Australasia) were 1.81 (1.38, 2.36) (1.10 (0.99, 1.22)) for all-cause mortality, 2.47(1.47, 4.17) (1.24 (1.02, 1.51)) for CVD mortality, 1.66 (1.00, 2.78) (1.01 (0.87, 1.17)) for cancer mortality and 2.09 (1.34, 3.26) (1.23 (1.04, 1.46)) for all CVD. Lower educational attainment is associated with a higher risk of CVD or premature mortality in Asia, to a degree exceeding that in the Western populations of Australasia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · BMJ Open
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    ABSTRACT: Background Most of what is known regarding the epidemiology of mortality from heart failure (HF) comes from studies within Western populations with few data available from the Asia-Pacific region where the burden of heart failure is increasing. Methods Individual level data from 543694 (85% Asian; 36% female) participants from 32 cohorts in the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration were included in the analysis. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for mortality from HF were estimated separately for Asians and non-Asians for a quintet of cardiovascular risk factors: systolic blood pressure, diabetes, body mass index, cigarette smoking and total cholesterol. All analyses were stratified by sex and study. Results During 3,793,229 person years of follow-up there were 614 HF deaths (80% Asian). The positive associations between elevated blood pressure, obesity, and cigarette smoking were consistent for Asians and non-Asians. There was evidence to indicate that diabetes was a weaker risk factor for death from HF for Asians compared with non-Asians: HR 1.26 (95% CI: 0.74-2.13) versus 3.04 (95% CI 1.76-5.25) respectively; p for interaction = 0.022. Additional adjustment for covariates did not materially change the overall associations. There was no good evidence to indicate that total cholesterol was a risk factor for HF mortality in either population. Conclusions Most traditional cardiovascular risk factors including elevated blood pressure, obesity and cigarette smoking appear to operate similarly to increase the risk of death from HF in Asians and non-Asians populations alike.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To observe the association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level and rate of ischemic stroke recurrence. Methods: A total of 1 059 patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled from 5 community health centers and underwent baseline surveys during the period of January 2003 to December 2006. After baseline surveys, patients were followed up every 6 months until December 31, 2008. The new stroke events were recorded as the primary study endpoint. The association between HDL-C, HDL-C/TC and ischemic stroke recurrence was analyzed by Cox regression analysis. Results: The proportions of stroke patients with high ( ≥ 1.55 mmol/L), moderate (1.04-1.54 mmol/L) and low (<1.04 mmol/L) HDL-C levels were 15.58% (165/1 059) , 54.58% (578/1 059) and 29.84% (316/1 059) respectively. During a mean of (3.21 ± 1.04) years follow-up, recurrent ischemic stroke was recorded in 137 patients. Compared with HDL-C ≥ 1.40 mmol/L group, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that stroke recurrence rates of patients with HDL-C ≤ 1.00 mmol/L and ranged from 1.01 to 1.19 mmol/L increased by 0.944 (HR = 1.944, 95%CI:1.033-3.659, P = 0.039) and 1.027 (HR = 2.027, 95%CI:1.116-3.682, P = 0.020)fold , respectively. Recurrence rates increased 1.237 (HR = 2.237, 95%CI:1.208-4.144, P = 0.010) fold in patients with HDL-C/TC ≤ 0.19 mmol/L compared to patients with HDL-C/TC ≥ 0.28 mmol/L. Conclusion: The risk of ischemic stroke recurrence increases with decreasing HDL-C level or HDL-C/TC ratio.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · Zhonghua xin xue guan bing za zhi [Chinese journal of cardiovascular diseases]
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To evaluate transitions in health status and risk of death in older adults in relation to baseline health deficits and protective factors.DesignProspective cohort study with reassessments at 5, 8, and 15 years.SettingSecondary analysis of data from the Beijing Longitudinal Study on Aging.ParticipantsUrban and rural community-dwelling people aged 55 and older at baseline (n = 3,275), followed from 1992 to 2007, during which time 51% died.MeasurementsHealth status was quantified using the deficit accumulation–based frailty index (FI), constructed from 30 intrinsic health measures. A protection index was constructed using 14 extrinsic items (e.g., exercise, education). The probabilities of health changes, including death, were evaluated using a multistate transition model.ResultsWomen had more health deficits (mean baseline FI 0.13 ± 0.11) than did men (mean baseline FI 0.11 ± 0.10). Although health declined on average (mean FIs increased), improvement and stability were common. Baseline health significantly affected health transitions and survival over various follow-up durations (odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17–1.37 for men; OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.16–1.33 for women for each increment of deficits). Each protective factor reduced the risk of health decline and the risk of death in men and women by 13% to 25%.Conclusion Deficit accumulation–based transition modeling demonstrates persisting effects of baseline health status on age-related health outcomes. Some mitigation by protective factors can be demonstrated, suggesting that improving physical and social conditions might be beneficial.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
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    Zachary Zimmer · Xianghua Fang · Zhe Tang
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine disability trends among men and women aged 70+ in Beijing, China; determine whether trends are impacted upon by changes in population composition; and investigate whether trends are experienced similarly across socio-demographic subgroups. Fifteen-year panel data were used to model probability of reporting activities of daily living (ADLs) disability adjusting for age, sex, marital status, residence, and education. Predicted probabilities and average annual percent change in probabilities are reported. The results showed increasing disability trends experienced by men, and stable or decreasing trends by women. Trends would be less favorable had education of older population not increased over time. Trends are much worse when bathing is excluded as an ADLs item. This is because trends in bathing were favorable whereas trends in other activities were not. On balance, results are not overly encouraging for reductions in population-level disability given population aging and increasing life expectancy in China. But, future increasing education could mitigate some increases in disability rates.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Journal of Aging and Health
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    ABSTRACT: Mild to moderate ischemic stroke is a common presentation in the outpatient setting. Among the various subtypes of stroke, lacunar infarction (LI) is generally very common. Currently, little is known about the long-term prognosis and factors associated with the prognosis between LI and non-LI. This study aims to compare the risk of death and acute cardiovascular events between patients with LI and non-LI, and identify potential risk factors associated with these outcomes. A total of 710 first-ever ischemic stroke patients (LI: 474, non-LI: 263) from 18 clinics were recruited consecutively from 2003 to 2004. They were prospectively followed-up until the end of 2008. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. After a 5-year follow up, 54 deaths and 96 acute cardiovascular events occurred. Recurrent stroke was the most common cause of death (19 cases, 35.18%) and new acute cardiovascular events (75 cases, 78.13%). There were no significant differences between patients with LI and non-LI in their risks of death, new cardiovascular events, and recurrent stroke after adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, cardiac diseases, body mass index, dyslipidemia, smoking, alcohol consumption, ADL dependence, and depressive symptoms. Among the modifiable risk factors, diabetes, hypertension, ADL dependency, and symptoms of depression were independent predictors of poor outcomes in patients with LI. In non-LI patients, however, no modifiable risk factors were detected for poor outcomes. Long-term outcomes did not differ significantly between LI and non-LI patients. Detecting and managing vascular risk factors and depression as well as functional rehabilitation may improve the prognoses of LI patients.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The risk of stroke is high in men among both Asian and non-Asian populations, despite differences in risk factor profiles; whether risk factors act similarly in these populations is unknown. To study the associations between five major risk factors and stroke risk, comparing Asian with non-Asian men. We obtained data from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration, a pooled analysis of individual participant data from 44 studies involving 386 411 men with 9·4 years follow-up. Using cohorts from Asia and Australia/New Zealand Cox models were fitted to estimate risk factor associations for ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We identified significant, positive associations between all five risk factors and risk of ischemic stroke. The associations between body mass index, smoking, and diabetes with ischemic stroke were comparable for men from Asia and Australia/New Zealand. The association between systolic blood pressure and ischemic stroke was stronger for Asian than Australia/New Zealand cohorts, whereas the reverse was true for total cholesterol. For haemorrhagic stroke, only systolic blood pressure and smoking were associated with increased risk, although the relationship with systolic blood pressure was significantly stronger for men from Asia than Australia/New Zealand (P interaction = 0·03), whereas the reverse was true for smoking (P interaction = 0·001). There was an inverse trend of total cholesterol with haemorrhagic stroke, significant only for Asian men. Men from the Asia-Pacific region share common risk factors for stroke. Strategies aimed at lowering population levels of systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, body mass index, smoking, and diabetes are likely to be beneficial in reducing stroke risk, particularly for ischemic stroke, across the region.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · International Journal of Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: On average, as people age, they accumulate more health deficits and have an increased risk of death. The deficit accumulation-based frailty index (FI) can quantify health and its outcomes in aging. Previous studies have suggested that women show higher FI values than men and that the highest FI score (the "limit to frailty") occurs at a value of FI ~ 0.7. Even so, gender differences in the limit to frailty have not been reported. Data for this analysis were obtained from the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging that involved 3,257 community-dwelling Chinese people, aged 55+ years at baseline. The main outcome measure was 5-year mortality. An FI consisting of 35 health-related variables was constructed. The absolute and 99% FI limits were calculated for different age groups and analyzed by sex. The mean level of the FI increased with age and was lower in men than in women (F = 67.87, p < .001). The 99% FI limit leveled off slightly earlier with a relatively lower value in men (60 years; 0.44 ± 0.02) compared with that in women (65 years; 0.52 ± 0.04). The highest absolute FI value was 0.61 in men and 0.69 in women. In both groups, people with an FI greater than or equal to the 99% limit showed close to 100% mortality by 5 years. Compared with men, women appeared to better tolerate deficits in health, yielding both relatively lower mortality and higher limit values to the FI. Even so, the FI did not exceed 0.7 in any individual.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, with higher rates among men than women. Relatively few studies on risk factor associations are available from the Asia-Pacific region, especially with regard to sex differences. Our objective was to compare the relationships between modifiable risk factors and IHD in men and women from the Asia-Pacific region. Methods: Data from 600,445 individuals from 44 studies from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration, an individual patient data overview, were used. Cox models were used to evaluate the effects of risk factors on fatal and non-fatal IHD separately in men and women from Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) and Asia. Results: Over a median follow-up of 6.7 years, 5695 IHD events were documented. The hazard ratio for IHD, comparing men with women, was 2.14 (95% CI 1.97-2.33) in ANZ and 1.88 (95% CI 1.54-2.29) in Asia. The age-adjusted prevalence of major risk factors was generally higher in men than women, especially in ANZ. Risk factors acted broadly similarly between men and women in both Asia and ANZ, with any indications of differences tending to favor men, rather than women. Conclusion: The excess risk of IHD observed in men compared with women in both Asia and ANZ may be, at least in part, a result of a more hazardous risk profile in men compared with women. The contribution of sex differences in the magnitude of the risk factor-disease associations is unlikely to be a contributing factor.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: all cardiometabolic disorders become more common with age. Frailty and increased vulnerability to adverse outcomes are also common with aging. Even so, how commonly elderly people who are affected by cardiometabolic disorders are also frail remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: (i) to evaluate the prevalence of cardiometabolic disorders in relation to frailty. (ii) To estimate to which extent cardiometabolic diseases, when compared with frailty, affects mortality. METHODS: this is a secondary analysis of the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a population-based representative cohort study (n = 3,257) assembled in 1992 and followed to 2007. The baseline frailty index (FI) considered 35 potential health deficits. People with an FI >0.22 were considered frail. The relationships between frailty and cardiometabolic disorders and mortality outcomes were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for baseline age, sex and education. RESULTS: the mean FI was 0.11 in men (SD = 0.10) and 0.14 (SD = 0.11) in women. On average, the FI increased with each cardiometabolic disorder (e.g. in men, mean ± SD = 0.16 ± 0.11 with hypertension, 0.23 ± 0.14 with stroke). As the number of disorders increased, so did the mean FI, and the proportion with the FI >0.22. For each condition, people with the FI >0.22 had a higher mortality, even after adjusting for sex, age and education. CONCLUSION: cardiometabolic disorders do not occur in isolation and commonly increase not just together, but in the presence of other health deficits. Healthcare providers who work with older adults with such problems need to develop methods to adapt their treatments to the needs of frail older adults.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Age and Ageing
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: all cardiometabolic disorders become more common with age. Frailty and increased vulnerability to adverse outcomes are also common with aging. Even so, how commonly elderly people who are affected by cardiometabolic disorders are also frail remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: (i) to evaluate the prevalence of cardiometabolic disorders in relation to frailty. (ii) To estimate to which extent cardiometabolic diseases, when compared with frailty, affects mortality. METHODS: this is a secondary analysis of the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a population-based representative cohort study (n = 3,257) assembled in 1992 and followed to 2007. The baseline frailty index (FI) considered 35 potential health deficits. People with an FI >0.22 were considered frail. The relationships between frailty and cardiometabolic disorders and mortality outcomes were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for baseline age, sex and education. RESULTS: the mean FI was 0.11 in men (SD = 0.10) and 0.14 (SD = 0.11) in women. On average, the FI increased with each cardiometabolic disorder (e.g. in men, mean ± SD = 0.16 ± 0.11 with hypertension, 0.23 ± 0.14 with stroke). As the number of disorders increased, so did the mean FI, and the proportion with the FI >0.22. For each condition, people with the FI >0.22 had a higher mortality, even after adjusting for sex, age and education. CONCLUSION: cardiometabolic disorders do not occur in isolation and commonly increase not just together, but in the presence of other health deficits. Healthcare providers who work with older adults with such problems need to develop methods to adapt their treatments to the needs of frail older adults.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Age and Ageing
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Colorectal cancer has several modifiable behavioural risk factors but their relationship to the risk of colon and rectum cancer separately and between countries with high and low incidence is not clear. Methods: Data from participants in the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration (APCSC) were used to estimate mortality from colon (International Classification of Diseases, revision 9 (ICD-9) 153, ICD-10 C18) and rectum (ICD-9 154, ICD-10 C19-20) cancers. Data on age, body mass index (BMI), serum cholesterol, height, smoking, physical activity, alcohol and diabetes mellitus were entered into Cox proportional hazards models. Results: 600,427 adults contributed 4,281,239 person-years follow-up. The mean ages (SD) for Asian and Australia/New Zealand cohorts were 44.0 (9.5) and 53.4 (14.5) years, respectively. 455 colon and 158 rectum cancer deaths were observed. Increasing age, BMI and attained adult height were associated with increased hazards of death from colorectal cancer, and physical activity was associated with a reduced hazard. After multiple adjustment, any physical activity was associated with a 28% lower hazard of colon cancer mortality (HR 0.72, 95%CI 0.53-0.96) and lower rectum cancer mortality (HR 0.75, 95%CI 0.45-1.27). A 2cm increase in height increased colon and all colorectal cancer mortality by 7% and 6% respectively. Conclusions: Physical inactivity and greater BMI are modifiable risk factors for colon cancer in both Western and Asian populations. Further efforts are needed to promote physical activity and reduce obesity while biological research is needed to understand the mechanisms by which they act to cause cancer mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP
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    ABSTRACT: The Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration (APCSC) was established in the late 1990s when there was a distinct shortfall in evidence of the importance of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Asia. With few exceptions, most notably from Japan, most of the published reports on cardiovascular disease in the last century were from Western countries, and there was uncertainty how far etiological associations found in the West could be assumed to prevail in the East. Against this background, APCSC was set up as a pooling project, combining individual participant data (about 600,000 subjects) from all available leading cohort studies (36 from Asia and 8 from Australasia) in the region, to fill the knowledge gaps. In the past 10 years, APCSC has published 50 peer-reviewed publications of original epidemiological research, primarily concerned with coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. This work has established that Western risk factors generally act similarly in Asia and in Australasia, just as they do in other parts of the world. Consequently, strategies to reduce the prevalence of elevated blood pressure, obesity, and smoking are at least as important in Asia as elsewhere- and possibly more important when the vast size of Asia is considered. This article reviews the achievements of APCSC in the past decade, with an emphasis on coronary heart disease. Copyright © 2012 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence rate of overweight and obese has been escalating over the past two decades in China. Even so, the association between obesity and stroke still remains unclear to some extent. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between body mass index and stroke in a large Chinese population cohort. A cohort of 26 607 Chinese people, aged over 35 years, was investigated in 1987. Baseline information of body weight and height was used to calculate BMI (weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared, kg/m2). Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to estimate hazard ratios of stroke adjusted for age, educational level, smoking and alcohol consumption. The 11-year follow-up revealed (241 149 person-years) a total of 1108 stroke events (614 ischemic, 451 hemorrhagic, and 44 undefined stroke). Body mass index ≥ 30·0 was an independent risk factor for stroke both in men and women. Compared with normal weight, hazard ratios for total stroke were 0·74 in men underweight (95% confidence interval: 0·53∼1·03), 1·63 overweight (95% confidence interval: 1·35∼1·96), and 2·20 with obesity (95% confidence interval: 1·47∼3·30); and with ischemic stroke, hazard ratios were 0·52 in those underweight (95% confidence interval: 0·30∼0·89), 2·08 overweight (95% confidence interval: 1·65∼2·62), and 3·80 with obesity (95% confidence interval: 2·47∼5·86). In women, the corresponding hazard ratios for total stroke were 0·79 underweight (95% confidence interval: 0·58∼1·07), 1·42 overweight (95% confidence interval: 1·16∼1·73), and 1·57 with obesity (95% confidence interval: 1·06∼2·31); and for those with ischemic stroke, 0·92 underweight (95% confidence interval: 0·59∼1·43), 1·90 overweight (95% confidence interval: 1·44∼2·50), and 2·42 with obesity (95% confidence interval: 1·50∼3·93). There appeared an evident dose-response relationship between body mass index and the risk of developing stroke, which still appeared, however, adjusted low for hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Decreased risk for stroke in the leanest group was confined to men only. No association was found between body mass index and hemorrhagic stroke in both genders. Our data suggest that body mass index was an independent risk factor for total and ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke in both genders. Association between body mass index and stroke was extremely mediated by hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Decreased risk for the leanest group was confined to men.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · International Journal of Stroke
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Smoking is common in China, where the population is aging rapidly. This study evaluated the relationship between smoking and frailty and their joint association with health and survival in older Chinese men and women. Methods: Data came from the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging, a representative cohort study with a 15-year follow-up. Community-dwelling people (n = 3257) aged more than 55 years at baseline were followed between 1992 and 2007, during which time 51% died. A frailty index (FI) was constructed from 28 self-reported health deficits. Results: Almost half (1,485 people; 45.6%) of the participants reported smoking at baseline (66.8% men, 25.3% women). On average, male smokers were frailer (FI = 0.17±0.13) than male nonsmokers (FI = 0.13±0.10; p = .038). No such differences were seen in women. Men who smoked had the lowest survival probability; female nonsmokers had the highest. Compared with female nonsmokers, the risk of death for male smokers was 1.58 (95% CI = 1.41-1.95; p < .001), adjusted for age and education. Across all FI values, female smokers and male nonsmokers had comparable survival rates. Conclusion: Smoking was associated with an increased rate of both worsening health and mortality. At all levels of health status, as defined by deficit accumulation, women who smoked lost the survival advantage conferred by their sex.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Multiple studies have examined the relationship between heart rate and mortality; however, there are discrepancies in results. Our aim was to describe the relationship between resting heart rate (RHR) and both major cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, as well as all-cause mortality in the Asia-Pacific region. Design and methods: Individual data from 112,680 subjects in 12 cohort studies were pooled and analysed using Cox models, stratified by study and sex, and adjusted for age and systolic blood pressure. Results: During a mean 7.4 years follow-up, 6086 deaths and 2726 fatal or nonfatal CV events were recorded. There was a continuous, increasing association between having a RHR above approximately 65 beats/min and the risk of both CV and all-cause mortality, yet there was no evidence of associations below this threshold. The hazard ratio (95% CI) comparing the extreme quarters of RHR (80+ v <65 beats/min) was 1.44 (1.29-1.60) for CV and 1.54 (1.43-1.66) for total mortality. These associations were not materially changed by adjustment for other risk factors and exclusion of the first 2 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios of a similar magnitude were found for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, but the hazard ratio for heart failure was higher (2.08, 95% CI 1.07-4.06) and for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) was lower (1.11, 95% CI 0.93-1.31) than for stroke. Conclusions: RHR of above 65 beats/min has a strong independent effect on premature mortality and stroke, but a lesser effect on CHD. Lifestyle and pharmaceutical regimens to reduce RHR may be beneficial for people with moderate to high levels of RHR.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012
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    ABSTRACT: The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure defined blood pressure (BP) levels of 120 to 139/80 to 89 mm Hg as prehypertension and those of ≥ 140/90 mm Hg as hypertension. Hypertension can be divided into 3 categories, isolated diastolic (IDH; systolic BP <140 mm Hg and diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg), isolated systolic (systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg and diastolic BP <90 mmHg), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg and diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg). Although there is clear evidence that isolated systolic hypertension and systolic-diastolic hypertension increase the risks of future vascular events, there remains uncertainty about the effects of IDH. The objective was to determine the effects of prehypertension and hypertension subtypes (IDH, isolated systolic hypertension, and systolic-diastolic hypertension) on the risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Asia-Pacific Region. The Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration is an individual participant data overview of cohort studies in the region. This analysis included a total of 346570 participants from 36 cohort studies. Outcomes were fatal and nonfatal CVD. The relationship between BP categories and CVD was explored using a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, cholesterol, and smoking and stratified by sex and study. Compared with normal BP (<120/80 mmHg), hazard ratios (95% CIs) for CVD were 1.41 (1.31-1.53) for prehypertension, 1.81 (1.61-2.04) for IDH, 2.18 (2.00-2.37) for isolated systolic hypertension, and 3.42 (3.17-3.70) for systolic-diastolic hypertension. Separately significant effects of prehypertension and hypertension subtypes were also observed for coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke. In the Asia-Pacific region, prehypertension and all hypertension subtypes, including IDH, thus clearly predicted increased risks of CVD.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Hypertension

Publication Stats

529 Citations
126.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002-2016
    • Xuanwu hospital
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2014
    • University of Queensland
      • School of Population Health
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • 2008-2014
    • Capital Medical University
      • Department of Neurobiology
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2009
    • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
      Borough of Manhattan, New York, United States
  • 2007
    • Yonsei University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea