Stefania Curti

University of Bologna, Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

Are you Stefania Curti?

Claim your profile

Publications (57)140.77 Total impact

  • Stefania Curti · David Coggon · Harald Hannerz · Stefano Mattioli
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To investigate the relationship between rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and frequent heavy lifting in a Danish working population through national register data. Methods: A dynamic cohort of all men aged 20-59 years in Denmark was followed through the Danish Occupational Hospitalisation Register from 1995 to 2010 for diagnosed RRD. Occupational categories were classified according to their potential for heavy lifting in 4 main groups: heavy lifters, manual workers unlikely to be heavy lifters, other manual workers and non-manual workers unlikely to be heavy lifters. The age-standardised rate of diagnosed RRD for heavy lifting occupations was compared with that experienced by the other 3 occupational categories. Rate ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated through a Poisson regression model adjusted for calendar period and age group. Results: The highest age-standardised rate of diagnosed RRD was recorded among non-manual workers performing occupational activities unlikely to be associated with heavy lifting (18.0 cases per 100 000 person-years). The RR for workers in jobs expected to entail a high frequency of heavy lifting compared with manual workers whose occupation was unlikely to be associated with heavy lifting was 0.91 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.14), while in comparison with other manual workers, it was 0.93 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.11). The RR compared with non-manual workers in occupations unlikely to entail heavy lifting was 0.51 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.60). Conclusions: These findings do not support an association of occupational heavy lifting with diagnosed RRD. The epidemiological evidence for this association is still inconclusive. Future studies should use a more specific measure of exposure to resolve the outstanding uncertainties.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Occupational and environmental medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Under-reporting of occupational diseases is an important issue worldwide. The collection of reliable data is essential for public health officials to plan intervention programmes to prevent occupational diseases. Little is known about the effects of interventions for increasing the reporting of occupational diseases. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of interventions aimed at increasing the reporting of occupational diseases by physicians. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, OSH UPDATE, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), OpenSIGLE, and Health Evidence until January 2015.We also checked reference lists of relevant articles and contacted study authors to identify additional published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. Selection criteria: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster-RCTs (cRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies, and interrupted time series (ITS) of the effects of increasing the reporting of occupational diseases by physicians. The primary outcome was the reporting of occupational diseases measured as the number of physicians reporting or as the rate of reporting occupational diseases. Data collection and analysis: Pairs of authors independently assessed study eligibility and risk of bias and extracted data. We expressed intervention effects as risk ratios or rate ratios. We combined the results of similar studies in a meta-analysis. We assessed the overall quality of evidence for each combination of intervention and outcome using the GRADE approach. Main results: We included seven RCTs and five CBA studies. Six studies evaluated the effectiveness of educational materials alone, one study evaluated educational meetings, four studies evaluated a combination of the two, and one study evaluated a multifaceted educational campaign for increasing the reporting of occupational diseases by physicians. We judged all the included studies to have a high risk of bias.We did not find any studies evaluating the effectiveness of Internet-based interventions or interventions on procedures or techniques of reporting, or the use of financial incentives. Moreover, we did not find any studies evaluating large-scale interventions like the introduction of new laws, existing or new specific disease registries, newly established occupational health services, or surveillance systems. Educational materialsWe found moderate-quality evidence that the use of educational materials did not considerably increase the number of physicians reporting occupational diseases compared to no intervention (risk ratio of 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74 to 1.67). We also found moderate-quality evidence showing that sending a reminder message of a legal obligation to report increased the number of physicians reporting occupational diseases (risk ratio of 1.32, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.66) when compared to a reminder message about the benefits of reporting.We found low-quality evidence that the use of educational materials did not considerably increase the rate of reporting when compared to no intervention. Educational materials plus meetingsWe found moderate-quality evidence that the use of educational materials combined with meetings did not considerably increase the number of physicians reporting when compared to no intervention (risk ratio of 1.22, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.81).We found low-quality evidence that educational materials plus meetings did not considerably increase the rate of reporting when compared to no intervention (rate ratio of 0.77, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.41). Educational meetingsWe found very low-quality evidence showing that educational meetings increased the number of physicians reporting occupational diseases (risk ratio at baseline: 0.82, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.41 and at follow-up: 1.74, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.74) when compared to no intervention.We found very low-quality evidence that educational meetings did not considerably increase the rate of reporting occupational diseases when compared to no intervention (rate ratio at baseline: 1.57, 95% CI 1.22 to 2.02 and at follow-up: 1.92, 95% CI 1.48 to 2.47). Educational campaignWe found very low-quality evidence showing that the use of an educational campaign increased the number of physicians reporting occupational diseases when compared to no intervention (risk ratio at baseline: 0.53, 95% CI 0.19 to 1.50 and at follow-up: 11.59, 95% CI 5.97 to 22.49). Authors' conclusions: We found 12 studies to include in this review. They provide evidence ranging from very low to moderate quality showing that educational materials, educational meetings, or a combination of the two do not considerably increase the reporting of occupational diseases. The use of a reminder message on the legal obligation to report might provide some positive results. We need high-quality RCTs to corroborate these findings.Future studies should investigate the effects of large-scale interventions like legislation, existing or new disease-specific registries, newly established occupational health services, or surveillance systems. When randomisation or the identification of a control group is impractical, these large-scale interventions should be evaluated using an interrupted time-series design.We also need studies assessing online reporting and interventions aimed at simplifying procedures or techniques of reporting and the use of financial incentives.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to construct PubMed search strings that could efficiently retrieve studies on manual therapy (MT), especially for time-constrained clinicians. Our experts chose 11 Medical Subject Heading terms describing MT along with 84 additional potential terms. For each term that was able to retrieve more than 100 abstracts, we systematically extracted a sample of abstracts from which we estimated the proportion of studies potentially relevant to MT. We then constructed 2 search strings: 1 narrow (threshold of pertinent articles ≥40%) and 1 expanded (including all terms for which a proportion had been calculated). We tested these search strings against articles on 2 conditions relevant to MT (thoracic and temporomandibular pain). We calculated the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to identify 1 potentially pertinent article in the context of these conditions. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of the proposed PubMed search strings to identify relevant articles included in a systematic review on spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain. Fifty-five search terms were able to extract more than 100 citations. The NNR to find 1 potentially pertinent article using the narrow string was 1.2 for thoracic pain and 1.3 for temporomandibular pain, and the NNR for the expanded string was 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. The narrow search strategy retrieved all the randomized controlled trials included in the systematic review selected for comparison. The proposed PubMed search strings may help health care professionals locate potentially pertinent articles and review a large number of MT studies efficiently to better implement evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics
  • Source
    A Farioli · S Mattioli · S Curti · F S Violante
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The BJC is owned by Cancer Research UK, a charity dedicated to understanding the causes, prevention and treatment of cancer and to making sure that the best new treatments reach patients in the clinic as quickly as possible. The journal reflects these aims. It was founded more than fifty years ago and, from the start, its far-sighted mission was to encourage communication of the very best cancer research from laboratories and clinics in all countries. The breadth of its coverage, its editorial independence and it consistent high standards, have made BJC one of the world's premier general cancer journals. Its increasing popularity is reflected by a steadily rising impact factor.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2014 · British Journal of Cancer
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To identify optimal cutoff values for body, hand, and wrist measurements in order to correctly identify individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.Methods We enrolled patients with CTS and control subjects at a 1:2 ratio, regardless of age and sex. The diagnosis of CTS was based on clinical findings and delayed distal conduction velocity of the median nerve. The anthropometric measurements included weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumferences, wrist depth/width, third digit length, and palm length/width. Obesity indicators and hand/wrist ratios were calculated. Area under the ROC curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated separately according to sex. To assess the role of multiple anthropometric measurements, we fit multivariable logistic regression models including age, wrist ratio, shape index, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio.ResultsThe study group comprised 1,117 subjects (250 female patients and 474 female controls; 120 male patients and 273 male controls). In women, the accuracy of all anthropometric measures was low (AUC ≤0.64). In men, the accuracy of the hand ratio, shape index, and wrist-to-palm ratio was moderate (AUC = 0.75). The estimates from the multivariable models confirmed the well-known associations between the selected variables and the risk of CTS, but the use of multiple predictors did not dramatically improve the diagnostic performance observed for single anthropometric indexes.Conclusion In clinical practice, the cutoff values for many anthropometric measurements have limited value as tools for the diagnosis of CTS.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Arthritis Care and Research
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives Several optimised search strategies have been developed in Medicine, and more recently in Occupational Medicine. Aim of this study is to identify efficient PubMed search strategies for the study of putative environmental determinants of a disease. Method We compiled a list of search terms (either Medical Subjects Heading [MeSH] or non-MeSH) seeming pertinent to exposure to pollutants as determinants of diseases in general population. We estimated proportions of potentially pertinent articles to formulate two search strategies (one “more specific”, one “more sensitive”). We applied these strategies to retrieve information on the putative environmental determinants of three diseases: autoimmune disease, sudden death and congenital heart defects. We evaluated the number of needed to read (NNR) abstracts to identify one potentially pertinent article in the context of these pathologies. Results The “more specific” search string was based on the combination of terms that yielded the highest proportion (≥ 40%) of potentially pertinent abstracts, including the MeSH terms ‘air pollutants’, ‘air pollution’, ‘disorders of environmental origin’, ‘environmental exposure’ and ‘particulate matter’. The “more sensitive” string was based on use of broader search fields and additional coverage provided by other search terms under study. Using the “more specific” string, the NNR to find one potentially pertinent article were: 2.7 for autoimmune disease; 3.2 for sudden death; 1.1 for congenital heart defects. Using the sensitive strategy, the NNR were 4.0, 6.1 and 3.4, respectively. Conclusions The proposed strings could help health care professionals investigate environmental determinants of medical conditions that could be related to pollution.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Several optimized search strategies have been developed in Medicine, and more recently in Occupational Medicine. The aim of this study was to identify efficient PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles regarding putative occupational determinants of agricultural workers' diseases. We selected the Medical Subjects Heading (MeSH) term agricultural workers' diseases and six MeSH terms describing farm work (agriculture, agrochemicals NOT pesticides, animal husbandry, pesticides, rural health, rural population) alongside 61 other promising terms. We estimated proportions of articles containing potentially pertinent information regarding occupational etiology to formulate two search strategies (one "more specific," one "more sensitive"). We applied these strategies to retrieve information on the possible occupational etiology among agricultural workers of kidney cancer, knee osteoarthritis, and multiple sclerosis. We evaluated the number of needed to read (NNR) abstracts to identify one potentially pertinent article in the context of these pathologies. The "more specific" search string was based on the combination of terms that yielded the highest proportion (40%) of potentially pertinent abstracts. The "more sensitive" string was based on use of broader search fields and additional coverage provided by other search terms under study. Using the "more specific" string, the NNR to find one potentially pertinent article were: 1.1 for kidney cancer; 1.4 for knee osteoarthritis; 1.2 for multiple sclerosis. Using the sensitive strategy, the NNR were 1.4, 3.6, and 6.3, respectively. The proposed strings could help health care professionals explore putative occupational etiology for agricultural workers' diseases (even if not generally thought to be work related). Am. J. Ind. Med. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2013 · American Journal of Industrial Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Musculoskeletal disorders are a relevant issue among farmers. From the literature it emerges a convincing evidence for an association of arthritis of the hip and work in the agricultural sector, while there is a less evidence when studying knee osteoarthritis and farming. For what concerns cervicobrachial pain, current available epidemiological data are not sufficient to define farmers at risk. Moreover, there is uncertainty about the role of hand-arm vibration as a strong risk factor among farmers. Overall, the high occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders among farmers highligths the need for more specific studies in order to assess the various tasks performed by agricultural workers from which to derive appropriate prevention interventions.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Giornale italiano di medicina del lavoro ed ergonomia
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in European countries varies considerably. We analyzed data from the fifth European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) to explore the role of personal, occupational, and social risk factors in determining the national prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. Over the course of 2010, 43 816 subjects from 34 countries were interviewed. We analyzed the one-year prevalence of back and neck/upper-limb pain. Individual-level risk factors studied included: sex; age; educational level; socioeconomic status; housework or cooking; gardening and repairs; somatizing tendency; job demand-control; six physical occupational exposures; and occupational group. Data on national socioeconomic variables were obtained from Eurostat and were available for 28 countries. We fitted Poisson regression models with random intercept by country. The main analysis comprised 35 550 workers. Among individual-level risk factors, somatizing tendency was the strongest predictor of the symptoms. Major differences were observed by country with back pain more than twice as common in Portugal (63.8%) than Ireland (25.7%), and prevalence rates of neck/upper-limb pain ranging from 26.6% in Ireland to 67.7% in Finland. Adjustment for individual-level risk factors slightly reduced the large variation in prevalence between countries. For back pain, the rates were more homogenous after adjustment for national socioeconomic variables. Our analysis indicates substantial variation between European countries in the prevalence of back and neck/upper-limb pain. This variation is unexplained by established individual risk factors. It may be attributable in part to socioeconomic differences between countries, with higher prevalence where there is less risk of poverty or social exclusion.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Candidate risk factors for idiopathic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) include heavy manual handling (requiring Valsalva's maneuver). We assessed incidence rates of surgically treated idiopathic RRD among manual workers, non-manual workers and housewives resident in Tuscany, Italy. We retrieved all hospital discharge records bearing a principal diagnosis corresponding to RRD coupled with retinal surgery for any resident of Tuscany during 1997-2009. After elimination of repeated admissions and patients with coexistent, associated conditions (including recent trauma), subjects aged 25-59 years were classified as manual workers, non-manual workers or housewives. Population data were extracted from the 2001 census. We identified 1,946 eligible cases (1,142 men). Among men, manual workers experienced a 1.8-fold higher age-standardized rate per 100,000 person-years than non-manual workers [17.4 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 16.1-18.7) vs. 9.8 (95 % CI 8.8-10.8)]. Age-standardized rates among women were 1.9-fold higher for manual workers [11.1 (95 % CI 9.8-12.3)] and 1.7-fold higher for housewives [9.5 (95 % CI 8.3-10.8)] than in non-manual workers [5.7 (95 % CI 4.8-6.6)]. This large population-based study suggests that manual workers are affected by idiopathic RRD requiring surgical treatment more often than non-manual workers. The higher rates of surgically treated RRD experienced by manual workers are in accord with the hypothesis that heavy manual handling may have a causal role.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and mesothelioma using data from the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries. Methods: We analyzed data from the SEER database (1973-2009). We compared EBRT versus no radiotherapy. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of mesothelioma among prostate cancer patients were estimated with multilevel Poisson models adjusted by race, age, and calendar year. Confounding by asbestos was investigated using relative risk of mesothelioma in each case's county of residence as a proxy for asbestos exposure. Results: Four hundred and seventy-one mesothelioma cases (93.6 % pleural) occurred in 3,985,991 person-years. The IRR of mesothelioma was increased for subjects exposed to EBRT (1.28; 95 % CI 1.05, 1.55) compared to non-irradiated patients, and a population attributable fraction of 0.49 % (95 % CI 0.11, 0.81) was estimated. The IRR increased with latency period: 0-4 years, IRR 1.08 (95 % CI 0.81, 1.44); 5-9 years, IRR 1.31 (95 % CI 0.93, 1.85); ≥10 years, IRR 1.59 (95 % CI 1.05, 2.42). Despite the fairly strong evidence of association with EBRT, the population attributable rate of mesothelioma was modest-3.3 cases per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of mesothelioma attributable to EBRT was 4.0/100,000 over 5 years, 24.5/100,000 over 10 years, and 65.0/100,000 over 15 years. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that EBRT for prostate cancer is a small but detectable risk factor for mesothelioma. Patients should be advised of risk of radiation-induced second malignancies.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Cancer Causes and Control
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purposes We conducted a case–control analysis to explore the association between occupational exposure to asbestos and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Methods The study was based on historical data from 155 consecutive patients with CC [69 intrahepatic CC (ICC) and 86 extrahepatic CC (ECC)] referred to Sant’Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital between 2006 and 2010. The cases were individually matched by calendar period of birth, sex, and region of residence to historical hospital and population controls. Occupational exposure to asbestos was retrospectively assessed considering job titles obtained from work histories. Separate conditional logistic regression models were applied for ECC and ICC. Estimates were adjusted for smoking status and socioeconomic class. Results We matched 149 controls (median birth year: 1947; males: 56 %) to 41 cases of ICC (median birth year: 1946; males: 56 %) and 212 controls (median birth year: 1945; males: 48 %) to 59 cases of ECC (median birth year: 1945; males 51 %); 53 cases were not matched due to residence or birth year. We found an increased risk of ICC in workers exposed to asbestos (adjusted OR 4.81, 95 % CI 1.73–13.33); we also observed suggestive evidence that asbestos exposure might be associated with ECC (adjusted OR 2.09, 95 % CI 0.83–5.27). Sensitivity analysis restricted to patients from the Province of Bologna produced confirmatory figures. Conclusions Our findings suggest that ICC could be associated with asbestos exposure; a chronic inflammatory pathway is hypothesized. Exposure to asbestos could be one of the determinants of the progressive rise in the incidence of ICC during the last 30 years.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Cancer Causes and Control
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: We investigated a possible association between pharyngeal/tonsillar carcinoma and mixed carcinogen exposures in an asphalt roll company in Italy that used asbestos until 1979, when a new factory was built using a different production process. Methods: We evaluated all workers involved in the entire production history of the company, divided into two subcohorts based on exposure status (workers in the original factory, 1964-1979, and those who worked only in the new factory, 1980-1997). We ascertained the vital status of the study population in February 2001. Results: Among the subset of workers in the earlier subcohort, there were five deaths from pharyngeal/tonsillar carcinoma for a standardized mortality ratio of 21 (95% confidence interval = 8.8-51). No cases were recorded among workers hired after 1979. Conclusion: The increased standardized mortality ratio for this relatively rare cancer among workers exposed before 1979 may have been due to carcinogenic exposures at the plant.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.)
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare the yield of hand-searching with optimised electronic search strategies in retrieving occupational health (OH) intervention studies published in a language other than English. The authors systematically hand-searched and screened reports of OH intervention studies published in Italian in peer-reviewed scientific journals between 1990 and 2008. The authors evaluated how many of them met the Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Groups (OSHRG) definition of being an OH intervention study and how many potentially relevant studies retrieved by hand-searching would not be found by PubMed alone using the OSHRG's most specific and most sensitive search strings. Hand-searching retrieved 25 articles (reporting 27 studies), including nine not indexed in MEDLINE. Most studies (81%, 22/27) had a before-after design and only one was a randomised trial. The OSHRG's most sensitive search string retrieved all 16 articles published in the Italian language journals that were indexed in MEDLINE, while the most specific search strategy retrieved nine articles (56%, 9/16). The most specific search string showed a lower 'number needed to read' value than the most sensitive one (60 vs 132). These findings suggest that a sensitive electronic search strategy may be able to find most of the OH interventions published in languages other than English that are indexed in MEDLINE. Hand-searching of important national journals not indexed in MEDLINE should be considered when conducting particularly in-depth research.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Occupational and environmental medicine
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lifting heavy weights involves the Valsalva manoeuvre, which leads to intraocular pressure spikes. We used data from a case-control study to further investigate the hypothesis that occupational lifting is a risk factor for retinal detachment. The study population included 48 cases (patients operated for retinal detachment) and 84 controls (outpatients attending an eye clinic). The odds ratios (OR) of idiopathic retinal detachment were estimated with a logistic regression model (adjusted for age, sex and body mass index). Three indexes were used to examine exposure to lifting; 1) maximum load lifted, 2) average weekly lifting, 3) lifelong cumulative lifting. For all indexes, the most exposed subjects showed an increased risk of retinal detachment compared with the unexposed (index 1: OR 3.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-10.48; index 2: OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.32-7.97; index 3: OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.27-8.74) and dose-response relationships were apparent. These results reinforce the hypothesis that heavy occupational lifting may be a relevant risk factor for retinal detachment.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Safety and Health at Work

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2011 · Occupational and Environmental Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2011 · Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives The aim of the study was to identify efficient PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles regarding putative occupational determinants of farmers' diseases. Methods Based on Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) definitions and expert knowledge, we selected the MeSH term agricultural workers' disease and, as candidate search terms, five MeSH terms describing farm work (pesticides, agriculture, rural population, rural health, agrochemicals NOT pesticides) alongside 25 other promising terms. Using random samples of abstracts retrieved by each term, we estimated proportions of articles containing potentially pertinent information regarding occupational aetiology in order to formulate two search strategies (one more “specific”, one more “sensitive”). We applied these strategies to retrieve information on possible occupational aetiology among farmers of knee osteoarthritis, multiple sclerosis and kidney cancer. We evaluated the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to identify one potentially pertinent article in the context of these pathologies. Results The more “specific” search string was based on the combination of terms that yielded the highest proportion (40%) of potentially pertinent abstracts. The more “sensitive” string was based on use of broader search fields and additional coverage provided by other search terms under study. Using the specific string, the NNR to find one potentially pertinent article were: 1.3 for knee osteoarthritis; 1.3 for multiple sclerosis; 1.1 for kidney cancer. Using the sensitive strategy, the NNR were 1.8, 2.4 and 1.4, respectively. Conclusions The proposed strings could help healthcare professionals explore putative occupational aetiology for farmers' diseases (even if not generally thought to be work-related).
    No preview · Article · Oct 2011 · Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Housework is a form of regular manual work that is often performed by women. Little is known about the entity of biomechanical exposure to the upper limbs during typical housework tasks. This study aims to make an initial quantitative estimate of some such exposures. We conducted objective assessments of biomechanical exposure to the upper limbs during nine frequent housework tasks performed by 12 women without domestic help. For the main evaluations, we implemented five instruments: the OCRA (Occupational Repetitive Actions) checklist; OREGE (Outil de Repérage et d'Evaluation des Gestes); the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) assessment of hand activity levels (HAL); RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment); and the full checklist of the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries. The ACGIH evaluation suggested light/moderate biomechanical exposure levels, as did the RULA. For the OCRA checklist and OREGE, time-weighted average scores (not adjusted by a duration multiplier because women may also routinely undergo biomechanical loads in other domestic or professional settings) were: OCRA checklist, 12.0 ("mild risk", light red) and OREGE, 10.2 ("not recommended"). The full checklist of Washington State Department of Labor and Industries showed that repetitive/similar movements (for >2 h/day) accompanied by other risk factors such as ≥30° bending of the wrists, ≥45° stretched wrists, ≥30° ulnar stretches, and manual force. Housework commonly entails light-moderate biomechanical loads that nevertheless could conceivably contribute to the genesis/worsening of musculoskeletal disorders. Biomechanical loads experienced by women during housework deserve greater consideration in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2011

Publication Stats

437 Citations
140.77 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2015
    • University of Bologna
      • Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences DIMEC
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
    • Karolinska Institutet
      Solna, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2006
    • Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy