Christian Slomianny

Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France

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Publications (133)543.92 Total impact

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    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), has anticancer effects. In vitro studies suggest that curcumin inhibits cancer cell growth by activating apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms leading to apoptosis in curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causing calcium release, with a destabilization of the mitochondrial compartment resulting in apoptosis. These events were also associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and of caspase-8 activation, mediated by cathepsins and calpains, leading to Bid cleavage. Truncated tBid disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and enhance apoptosis. We followed the induction of autophagy, marked by the formation of autophagosomes, by staining with acridine orange in cells exposed curcumin. At this concentration, only the early events of apoptosis (initial mitochondrial destabilization with any other manifestations) weredetectable. Western blotting demonstrated the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II (light chain 3), a marker of active autophagosome formation. We also found that the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of autophagosomes following curcumin treatment was almost completely blocked by N-acetylcystein, the mitochondrial specific antioxidants MitoQ10 and SKQ1, the calcium chelators, EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM, and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor, ruthenium red. Curcumin-induced autophagy failed to rescue all cells and most cells underwent type II cell death following the initial autophagic processes. All together, these data imply a fail-secure mechanism regulated by autophagy in the action of curcumin, suggesting a therapeutic potential for curcumin. Offering a novel and effective strategy for the treatment of malignant cells.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Curcumin, a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), has anticancer effects. In vitro studies suggest that curcumin inhibits cancer cell growth by activating apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms leading to apoptosis in curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causing calcium release, with a destabilization of the mitochondrial compartment resulting in apoptosis. These events were also associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and of caspase-8 activation, mediated by cathepsins and calpains, leading to Bid cleavage. Truncated tBid disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and enhance apoptosis. We followed the induction of autophagy, marked by the formation of autophagosomes, by staining with acridine orange in cells exposed curcumin. At this concentration, only the early events of apoptosis (initial mitochondrial destabilization with any other manifestations) were detectable. Western blotting demonstrated the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II (light chain 3), a marker of active autophagosome formation. We also found that the production of reactive oxygen species and formation of autophagosomes following curcumin treatment was almost completely blocked by N-acetylcystein, the mitochondrial specific antioxidants MitoQ10 and SKQ1, the calcium chelators, EGTA-AM or BAPTA-AM, and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor, ruthenium red. Curcumin-induced autophagy failed to rescue all cells and most cells underwent type II cell death following the initial autophagic processes. All together, these data imply a fail-secure mechanism regulated by autophagy in the action of curcumin, suggesting a therapeutic potential for curcumin. Offering a novel and effective strategy for the treatment of malignant cells. Curcumin, extracted from the plant Curcuma Longa, has long been recognized as a very promising anticancer drug because of its many beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activities.1,2 Curcumin is a potent bioactive compound that is used to treat cancer,3 atherosclerosis4 and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s4,5 and Parkinson’s disease.6 Curcumin is particularly appealing as a therapeutic agent because of its low toxicity, although its intracellular bioavailability is quite low.7 Curcumin has antiproliferative and anti-carcinogenic properties and may be useful for cancer prevention. The mechanisms underlying curcumininduced cancer cell death have not been clearly defined, although available evidence suggests that curcumin downregulates NF-κB signaling, which suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis.8,9 Although both caspase 8-mediated and/or caspase 9-dependent apoptosis have been reported to occur upon the exposure of cancer cells to curcumin,10,11 discrepant results exist for caspase- 8.12 Indeed, it is still unclear which caspase functions as the initiator caspase. Curcumin induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis13,14 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in this process.15 Complex interplay between autophagy and apoptosis
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Deviation of the ambient temperature is one of the most ubiquitous stimuli that continuously affect mammals' skin. Although the role of the warmth receptors in epidermal homeostasis (EH) was elucidated in recent years, the mystery of the keratinocyte mild-cold sensor remains unsolved. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a new functional epidermal isoform of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) mild-cold receptor, dubbed epidermal TRPM8 (eTRPM8), which is localized in the keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controls mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m). In turn, [Ca2+]m modulates ATP and superoxide ([Formula: see text]) synthesis in a cold-dependent manner. We report that this fine tuning of ATP and [Formula: see text] levels by cooling controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Finally, to ascertain eTRPM8's role in EH in vivo we developed a new functional knockout mouse strain by deleting the pore domain of TRPM8 and demonstrated that eTRPM8 knockout impairs adaptation of the epidermis to low temperatures.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Unlike mammals, the CNS of the medicinal leech can regenerate damaged neurites, thus restoring neural functions after lesion. We previously demonstrated that the injured leech nerve cord is able to mount an immune response promoting the regenerative processes. Indeed neurons and microglia express sensing receptors like Hm-TLR1, a leech TLR ortholog, associated with chemokine release in response to a septic challenge or lesion. To gain insights into the TLR signaling pathways involved during these neuroimmune responses, members of the MyD88 family were investigated. In the present study, we report the characterization of Hm-MyD88 and Hm-SARM. The expression of their encoding gene was strongly regulated in leech CNS not only upon immune challenge but also during CNS repair, suggesting their involvement in both processes. This work also showed for the first time that differentiated neurons of the CNS could respond to LPS through a MyD88-dependent signalling pathway, while in mammals, studies describing the direct effect of LPS on neurons and the outcomes of such treatment are scarce and controversial. In the present study, we established that this PAMP induced the relocalization of Hm-MyD88 in isolated neurons.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Scientific Reports
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    ABSTRACT: Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii have complex life cycles within different hosts and their infectivity relies on their capacity to regulate gene expression. However, little is known about the nuclear factors that regulate gene expression in these pathogens. Here, we report that T. gondii enolase TgENO2 is targeted to the nucleus of actively replicating parasites, where it specifically binds to nuclear chromatin in vivo. Using a ChIP-Seq technique, we provide evidence for TgENO2 enrichment at the 5' untranslated gene regions containing the putative promoters of 241 nuclear genes. Ectopic expression of HA-tagged TgENO1 or TgENO2 led to changes in transcript levels of numerous gene targets. Targeted disruption of TgENO1 gene results in a decrease in brain cyst burden of chronically infected mice and in changes in transcript levels of several nuclear genes. Complementation of this knockout mutant with ectopic TgENO1-HA fully restored normal transcript levels. Our findings reveal that enolase functions extend beyond glycolytic activity and include a direct role in coordinating gene regulation in T. gondii.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to establish the presence and function of the mucous layer surrounding spores of Bacillus subtilis. First, an external layer of variable thickness and regularity was often observed on B. subtilis spores. Further analyses were performed on B. subtilis 98/7 spores surrounded by a thick layer. The mechanical removal of the layer did not affect their resistance to heat or their ability to germinate but rendered the spore less hydrophilic, more adherent to stainless steel, and more resistant to cleaning. This layer was mainly composed of 6-deoxyhexoses, ie rhamnose, 3-O-methyl-rhamnose and quinovose, but also of glucosamine and muramic lactam, known also to be a part of the bacterial peptidoglycan. The specific hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan using lysozyme altered the structure of the required mucous layer and affected the physico-chemical properties of the spores. Such an outermost mucous layer has also been seen on spores of B. licheniformis and B. clausii isolated from food environments.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Biofouling
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    ABSTRACT: ORAI family channels have emerged as important players in malignant transformation, yet the way in which they reprogram cancer cells remains elusive. Here we show that the relative expression levels of ORAI proteins in prostate cancer are different from that in noncancerous tissue. By mimicking ORAI protein remodeling observed in primary tumors, we demonstrate in in vitro models that enhanced ORAI3 expression favors heteromerization with ORAI1 to form a novel channel. These channels support store-independent Ca(2+) entry, thereby promoting cell proliferation and a smaller number of functional homomeric ORAI1-based store-operated channels, which are important in supporting susceptibility to apoptosis. Thus, our findings highlight disrupted dynamic equilibrium of channel-forming proteins as an oncogenic mechanism.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Cancer Cell
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    ABSTRACT: Bacillus strains are often isolated from biofilms in the food industries. Previous works have demonstrated that sporulation could occur in biofilms, suggesting that biofilms would be a significant source of food contamination with spores. In this study, we investigated the properties of mono-species and mixed Bacillus biofilms and the ability of Bacillus strains to sporulate inside biofilms. Bacillus strains were able to form mono-species biofilms on stainless steel coupons, with up to 90% spores after a 48 h-incubation. These spores were highly resistant to cleaning but were easily transferred to agar, mimicking the cross-contamination of food, thereby suggesting that biofilms would be of particular concern due to a potential for Bacillus spore food contamination. This hypothesis was strengthened by the fact that Bacillus strains were able to form mixed biofilms with resident strains and that sporulation still occurred easily in these complex structures.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Food Microbiology
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    ABSTRACT: The growing number of studies suggested that inhibition of autophagy enhances the efficacy of Akt kinase inhibitors in cancer therapy. Here, we provide evidence that ML-9, a widely used inhibitor of Akt kinase, myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), represents the 'two-in-one' compound that stimulates autophagosome formation (by downregulating Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway) and inhibits their degradation (by acting like a lysosomotropic agent and increasing lysosomal pH). We show that ML-9 as a monotherapy effectively induces prostate cancer cell death associated with the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. Further, ML-9 enhances the anticancer activity of docetaxel, suggesting its potential application as an adjuvant to existing anticancer chemotherapy. Altogether, our results revealed the complex effect of ML-9 on autophagy and indentified ML-9 as an attractive tool for targeting autophagy in cancer therapy through dual inhibition of both the Akt pathway and the autophagy.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Cell Death & Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric mucosa is a necessary prerequisite for the pathogenesis of H. pylori–related diseases. In this study, we investigated the GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc motif (also known as N,N’-diacetyllactosediamine [lacdiNAc]) carried by MUC5AC gastric mucins as the target for bacterial binding to the human gastric mucosa. The expression of LacdiNAc carried by gastric mucins was correlated with H. pylori localization, and all strains tested adhered significantly to this motif. Proteomic analysis and mutant construction allowed the identification of a yet uncharacterized bacterial adhesin, LabA, which specifically recognizes lacdiNAc. These findings unravel a target of adhesion for H. pylori in addition to moieties recognized by the well-characterized adhesins BabA and SabA. Localization of the LabA target, restricted to the gastric mucosa, suggests a plausible explanation for the tissue tropism of these bacteria. These results pave the way for the development of alternative strategies against H. pylori infection, using adherence inhibitors.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · The Journal of Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: We study the aggregation of a fragment of the neuronal protein Tau that contains part of the proline rich domain and of the microtubule binding repeats. When incubated at 37°C with heparin, the fragment readily forms fibers as witnessed by Thioflavin T fluorescence. Electron microscopy and NMR spectroscopy show bundled ribbon like structures with most residues rigidly incorporated in the fibril. Without its cysteines, this fragment still forms fibers of a similar morphology, but with lesser Thioflavin T binding sites and more mobility ifor the C-terminal residues.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Bisphenol A (BPA), the principal constituent of reusable water bottles, metal cans, and plastic food containers, has been shown to be involved in human prostate cancer (PCa) cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of BPA on PCa cell migration and the pathways involved in these processes. Using the transwell technique, we clearly show for the first time that the pre-treatment of the cells with BPA (1-10 nM) induces human PCa cell migration. Using a calcium imaging technique, we show that BPA pre-treatment induces an amplification of Store-Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) in LNCaP cells. RT-PCR and Western blot experiments allowed the identification of the ion channel proteins which are up-regulated by BPA pre-treatments. These include the Orai1 protein, which is known as an important SOCE actor in various cell systems, including human PCa cells. Using a siRNA strategy, we observed that BPA-induced amplification of SOCE was Orai1-dependent. Interestingly, the BPA-induced PCa cell migration was suppressed when the calcium entry was impaired by the use of SOCE inhibitors (SKF96365, BTP2), or when the extracellular calcium was chelated. Taken together, the results presented here show that BPA induces PCa cells migration via a modulation of the ion channel protein expression involved in calcium entry and in cancer cell migration. The present data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of an environmental factor on cancer cells and suggest both the necessity of preventive measures and the possibility of targeting ion channels in the treatment of PCa cell metastasis.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · SpringerPlus
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    ABSTRACT: In screening indigenous soil filamentous fungi for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation, an isolate of the Fusarium solani was found to incorporate benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) into fungal hyphae before degradation and mineralization. The mechanisms involved in BaP uptake and intracellular transport remain unresolved. To address this, the incorporation of two PAHs, BaP, and phenanthrene (PHE) were studied in this fungus. The fungus incorporated more BaP into cells than PHE, despite the 400-fold higher aqueous solubility of PHE compared with BaP, indicating that PAH incorporation is not based on a simple diffusion mechanism. To identify the mechanism of BaP incorporation and transport, microscopic studies were undertaken with the fluorescence probes Congo Red, BODIPY®493/503, and FM®4-64, targeting different cell compartments respectively fungal cell walls, lipids, and endocytosis. The metabolic inhibitor sodium azide at 100 mM totally blocked BaP incorporation into fungal cells indicating an energy-requirement for PAH uptake into the mycelium. Cytochalasins also inhibited BaP uptake by the fungus and probably its intracellular transport into fungal hyphae. The perfect co-localization of BaP and BODIPY reveals that lipid bodies constitute the intracellular storage sites of BaP in F. solani. Our results demonstrate an energy-dependent uptake of BaP and its cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport by F. solani.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Environmental Science and Pollution Research
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    ABSTRACT: In screening indigenous soil filamentous fungi for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation, an isolate of the Fusarium solani was found to incorporate benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) into fungal hyphae before degradation and mineralization. The mechanisms involved in BaP uptake and intracellular transport remain unresolved. To address this, the incorporation of two PAHs, BaP, and phenanthrene (PHE) were studied in this fungus. The fungus incorporated more BaP into cells than PHE, despite the 400-fold higher aqueous solubility of PHE compared with BaP, indicating that PAH incorporation is not based on a simple diffusion mechanism. To identify themechanismof BaP incorporation and transport, microscopic studies were undertaken with the fluorescence probes Congo Red, BODIPY®493/503, and FM®4-64, targeting different cell compartments respectively fungal cell walls, lipids, and endocytosis. The metabolic inhibitor sodium azide at 100 mM totally blocked BaP incorporation into fungal cells indicating an energy-requirement for PAH uptake into the mycelium. Cytochalasins also inhibited BaP uptake by the fungus and probably its intracellular transport into fungal hyphae. The perfect co-localization of BaP and BODIPY reveals that lipid bodies constitute the intracellular storage sites of BaP in F. solani. Our results demonstrate an energy-dependent uptake of BaP and its cytoskeletondependent intracellular transport by F. solani
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Environmental Science and Pollution Research
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    ABSTRACT: Autophagy, or cellular self-eating, is a tightly regulated cellular pathway the main purpose of which is lysosomal degradation and subsequent recycling of cytoplasmic material to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Defects in autophagy are linked to a variety of pathological states, including cancer. Cancer is the disease associated with abnormal tissue growth following an alteration in such fundamental cellular processes as apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, migration and autophagy. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex, as it can promote both tumor prevention and survival/treatment resistance. It's now clear that modulation of autophagy has a great potential in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings identified intracellular calcium as an important regulator of both basal and induced autophagy. Calcium is a ubiquitous secondary messenger which regulates plethora of physiological and pathological processes such as aging, neurodegeneration and cancer. The role of calcium and calcium-permeable channels in cancer is well-established, whereas the information about molecular nature of channels regulating autophagy and the mechanisms of this regulation is still limited. Here we review existing mechanisms of autophagy regulation by calcium and calcium-permeable ion channels. Furthermore, we will also discuss some calcium-permeable channels as the potential new candidates for autophagy regulation. Finally we will propose the possible link between calcium permeable channels, autophagy and cancer progression and therapeutic response.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · Frontiers in Physiology
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    Stanislas Tomavo · Christian Slomianny · Markus Meissner · Vern B Carruthers
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    ABSTRACT: Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis) and Plasmodium (malaria) use unique secretory organelles for migration, cell invasion, manipulation of host cell functions, and cell egress. In particular, the apical secretory micronemes and rhoptries of apicomplexan parasites are essential for successful host infection. New findings reveal that the contents of these organelles, which are transported through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi, also require the parasite endosome-like system to access their respective organelles. In this review, we discuss recent findings that demonstrate that these parasites reduced their endosomal system and modified classical regulators of this pathway for the biogenesis of apical organelles.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · PLoS Pathogens
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    ABSTRACT: It is strongly suspected that potassium (K(+)) channels are involved in various aspects of prostate cancer development, such as cell growth. However, the molecular nature of those K(+) channels implicated in prostate cancer cell proliferation and the mechanisms through which they control proliferation are still unknown. This study uses pharmacological, biophysical and molecular approaches to show that the main voltage-dependent K(+) current in prostate cancer LNCaP cells is carried by large-conductance BK channels. Indeed, most of the voltage-dependent current was inhibited by inhibitors of BK channels (paxillin and iberiotoxin) and by siRNA targeting BK channels. In addition, we reveal that BK channels constitute the main K(+) channel family involved in setting the resting membrane potential in LNCaP cells at around -40 mV. This consequently promotes a constitutive calcium entry through T-type Cav3.2 calcium channels. We demonstrate, using single-channel recording, confocal imaging and co-immunoprecipitation approaches, that both channels form macromolecular complexes. Finally, using flow cytometry cell cycle measurements, cell survival assays and Ki67 immunofluorescent staining, we show that both BK and Cav3.2 channels participate in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Biology Open
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    ABSTRACT: Metal health: Ferroquine is a ferrocene-based analogue of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. In addition to the primary mechanism of quinoline action, fluorescent probe studies in infected red blood cells show another mechanism is at work. It is based on the production of HO(.) in the acidic and oxidizing environment of the digestive vacuole of the malaria parasite and implies that with ferroquine reinvasion can be inhibited.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Publication Stats

4k Citations
543.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001-2015
    • Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1
      • Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire (PhyCel)
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2010-2014
    • University of Lille Nord de France
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1997-2014
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 1996-2013
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007
    • Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2004
    • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1998
    • Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1995
    • Institut Pasteur
      • Department of Parasitology and Mycology
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France