Rika Umemiya-Shirafuji

Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obibiro, Hokkaido, Japan

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Publications (36)141.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Acaricide failure has been on the rise in the western and central cattle corridor of Uganda. In this study, we identified the tick species associated with acaricide failure and determined their susceptibility to various acaricide molecules used for tick control in Uganda. Methods: In this cross sectional study, tick samples were collected and identified to species level from 54 purposively selected farms (from 17 districts) that mostly had a history of acaricide failure. Larval packet test was used to screen 31 tick populations from 30 farms for susceptibility at discriminating dose (DD) and 2 x DD of five panels of commercial acaricide molecules belonging to the following classes; amidine, synthetic pyrethroid (SP), organophosphate (OP) and OP-SP co-formulations (COF). Resistance was assessed based on World Health Organization criteria for screening insecticide resistance. Results: Of the 1357 ticks identified, Rhipicephalus (Rhipicephalus) appendiculatus and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus were the major (95.6 %) tick species in farms sampled. Resistance against SP was detected in 90.0 % (27/30) of the tick populations tested. Worryingly, 60.0 % (18/30) and 63.0 % (19/30) of the above ticks were super resistant (0 % mortality) against 2 x DD cypermethrin and deltamethrin, respectively. Resistance was also detected against COF (43.3 %), OP chlorfenvinphos (13.3 %) and amitraz (12.9 %). In two years, 74.1 % (20/27) of the farms had used two to three acaricide molecules, and 55.6 % (15/27) rotated the molecules wrongly. Multi-acaricide resistance (at least 2 molecules) was detected in 55.2 % (16/29) of the resistant Rhipicephalus ticks and significantly associated with R. decoloratus (p = 0.0133), use of both SP and COF in the last 2 years (p < 0.001) and Kiruhura district (p = 0.0339). Despite emergence of amitraz resistance in the greater Bushenyi area, it was the most efficacious molecule against SP and COF resistant ticks. Conclusion: This study is the first to report emergence of super SP resistant and multi-acaricide resistant Rhipicephalus ticks in Uganda. Amitraz was the best acaricide against SP and COF resistant ticks. However, in the absence of technical interventions, farmer-led solutions aimed at troubleshooting for efficacy of multitude of acaricides at their disposal are expected to potentially cause negative collateral effects on future chemical tick control options, animal welfare and public health.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2016 · Parasites & Vectors
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    Daniel J Klionsky · Kotb Abdelmohsen · Akihisa Abe · Md Joynal Abedin · Hagai Abeliovich · Abraham Acevedo Arozena · Hiroaki Adachi · Christopher M Adams · Peter D Adams · Khosrow Adeli · [...] · Xiao-Feng Zhu · Yuhua Zhu · Shi-Mei Zhuang · Xiaohong Zhuang · Elio Ziparo · Christos E Zois · Teresa Zoladek · Wei-Xing Zong · Antonio Zorzano · Susu M Zughaier ·
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. For example, a key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process including the amount and rate of cargo sequestered and degraded). In particular, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation must be differentiated from stimuli that increase autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. It is worth emphasizing here that lysosomal digestion is a stage of autophagy and evaluating its competence is a crucial part of the evaluation of autophagic flux, or complete autophagy. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. Along these lines, because of the potential for pleiotropic effects due to blocking autophagy through genetic manipulation, it is imperative to target by gene knockout or RNA interference more than one autophagy-related protein. In addition, some individual Atg proteins, or groups of proteins, are involved in other cellular pathways implying that not all Atg proteins can be used as a specific marker for an autophagic process. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Autophagy
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    ABSTRACT: Iron is an indispensable element for most microorganisms, including many pathogenic bacteria. Iron-withholding is a known component of the innate immunity, particularly of vertebrate hosts. Ticks are vectors of multiple pathogens and reports have shown that they naturally harbor several bacterial species. Thus, tick innate immunity must be crucial in limiting bacterial population to tolerable level that will not cause adverse effects. We have previously characterized two types of the iron-binding protein ferritin (HlFER) in the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis, known to be a vector of some protozoan parasites and rickettsiae, and showed their antioxidant function and importance in blood feeding and reproduction. Here we examined the possible role of HlFERs in tick immunity against bacterial infection. After silencing Hlfer genes, adult ticks were injected with live enhanced green fluorescence protein-expressing Escherichia coli, and then monitored for survival rate. Hemolymph that included hemocytes was collected for microscopic examination to observe cellular immune response, and for E. coli culture to determine bacterial viability after injection in the ticks. The expression of some antimicrobial peptides in whole ticks was also analyzed by RT-PCR. Hlfer-silenced ticks had a significantly lower survival rate than control ticks after E. coli injection. Greater number of bacteria inside and outside the hemocytes and higher bacterial colony counts after culture with hemolymph were also observed in Hlfer-silenced ticks. However, no difference on the expression of antimicrobial peptides was observed. These results suggest that ferritin molecules might be important in the cellular immune response of ticks to some bacteria.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Parasitology International
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    ABSTRACT: C-type lectins (CLecs) play an important role in innate immunity against invaders. In this study, a novel CLec was identified from Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks (HlCLec). HlCLec contains a signal peptide and a transmembrane region. Interestingly, HlCLec possesses three dissimilar carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Each CRD contains the mutated motif of Ca(2+)-binding site 2. HlCLec mRNA was up-regulated during blood feeding, and had highest expression in the midgut and ovary. HlCLec localization was also confirmed by immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). HlCLec was found on the cell membrane and basal lamina of midgut and ovary. In addition, the recombinant HlCLec and individual CRDs demonstrated direct binding activity to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus; however, no growth inhibition activity was observed. Furthermore, E. coli injection after silencing of HlCLec caused drastic reduction in survival rate of ticks. These results strongly suggest the key role of HlCLec in tick innate immunity against Gram-negative bacteria.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Developmental and comparative immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Murine Eimeria spp. have been used as effective models of disease instead of large mammalian hosts such as cattle. We attempted to establish in vivo and in vitro assays using a murine intestinal protozoan, Eimeria krijgsmanni, which we previously isolated, to test anti-parasitic agents. Consequently, when mice were treated with sulfur drugs or toltrazuril, which are commercially available for livestock. Furthermore, sporulated oocysts and excysted sporozoites of E. krijgsmanni were treated with naturally occurring substances (lactoferrin, longicin, and curcumin). Although exposure to these substances did not affect oocyst infectivity, sporozoite viability decreased by 60% with longicin. However, direct injection of sporozoites treated with longicin into mice ceca did not result in any changes in the oocyst shedding pattern compared with control mice. The results suggest that E. krijgsmanni could be resistant to these anti-parasitic agents and might therefore have different characteristics to other apicomplexan parasites.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Acta Parasitologica
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    ABSTRACT: Ticks are notorious parasitic arthropods, known for their completely host-blood-dependent lifestyle. Hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) feed on their hosts for several days and can ingest blood more than a hundred times their unfed weight. Their blood-feeding habit facilitates the transmission of various pathogens. It is remarkable how hard ticks cope with the toxic nature of their blood meal, which contains several molecules that can promote oxidative stress including iron. While it is required in several physiological processes, high amounts of iron can be dangerous because iron can also participate in the formation of free radicals that may cause cellular damage and death. Here we review the current knowledge on heme and inorganic iron metabolism in hard ticks and compare it with that in vertebrates and other arthropods. We briefly discuss the studies on heme transport, storage and detoxification, and the transport and storage of inorganic iron, with emphasis on the functions of tick ferritins. This review points out other aspects of tick iron metabolism that warrant further investigation, as compared to mammals and other arthropods. Further understanding of this physiological process may help in formulating new control strategies for tick infestation and the spread of tick-borne diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Parasitology International
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    ABSTRACT: Background Tick control is an essential aspect of controlling the spread of tick-borne diseases affecting humans and animals, but it presently faces several challenges. Development of an anti-tick vaccine is aimed at designing cost-effective and environmentally friendly protection against ticks and tick-borne diseases as an alternative to the use of chemical acaricides. A single vaccine from the tick midgut protein Bm86 is currently available for field applications, but its efficacy is limited to only some tick species. Identification of candidate vaccine antigens that can affect multiple tick species is highly desirable. The hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis has two kinds of the iron-binding protein ferritin (HlFER), an intracellular HlFER1 and a secretory HlFER2, and RNA interference experiments showed that these are physiologically important in blood feeding and reproduction and in protection against oxidative stress. Here we investigated the potential of targeting HlFERs for tick control by immunizing the host with recombinant HlFERs (rHlFER1 and rHlFER2).Methods Rabbits were immunized with rHlFERs three times subcutaneously at two-week intervals. Antisera were collected before the first immunization and a week after each immunization to confirm the antigen-specific serum antibody titer by serum ELISA. Two weeks after the final immunization, the rabbits were challenged with tick infestation. After dropping, tick feeding and reproduction parameters were evaluated to determine vaccine efficacy. To demonstrate the effects of antibodies, oxidative stress was detected in the eggs and larvae.ResultsThe antibody titer of rHlFER-immunized rabbits greatly increased after the second immunization. Antibodies exhibited cross-reactivity with rHlFERs and reacted with tick native HlFERs in Western blot analysis. Significantly lower bodyweight was observed in the ticks infested from the rHlFER2-immunized rabbit compared to those from the control rabbit. Reduced oviposition and hatching rate were observed in both rHlFER-immunized groups. rHlFER2 showed a higher vaccine efficacy. The antibodies against rHlFERs were detected in the eggs, and higher levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in the eggs and larvae, of ticks from rHlFER vaccinated rabbits.Conclusion Collectively, these results showed that HlFER2 has a good potential as an anti-tick vaccine antigen that may affect multiple tick species.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Parasites & Vectors
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, infection experiments of E. krijgsmanni using various hosts were conducted to elucidate the host specificity among some animals and the infectivity to mouse strains. According to the results, the infection was not found in most animals, except for rats, in which some oocyst shedding was detected, and there was no significant difference in infectivity among mouse strains. Additionally, oocyst shedding was hardly detectable in a secondary infection to immunocompetent mice, although it was found in immunodeficient mice. These results indicated that only immunocompetent mice could develop adaptive immunity against reinfection by stimuli of the primary infection. Furthermore, the infection experiments were performed with splenic macrophage (Mφ)-depleted mice with a reagent and Beige (Bg) mice known to be a strain of mice with low NK cell activity. No significant effect was found in primary or secondary infections in the Mφ-depleted mice, whereas the mortality rate was clearly increased in Bg mice inoculated with a large number of oocysts. Their oocyst shedding was similar to that of immunocompetent hosts. Taken together, these results suggested that Mφ has only a minor role in the immune response, but the NK cell has an important function in resistance to primary infection of E. krijgsmanni.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Acta Parasitologica
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    ABSTRACT: Ticks are obligate hematophagous parasites that have successfully developed counteractive means against their hosts' immune and hemostatic mechanisms, but their ability to cope with potentially toxic molecules in the blood remains unclear. Iron is important in various physiological processes but can be toxic to living cells when in excess. We previously reported that the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis has an intracellular (HlFER1) and a secretory (HlFER2) ferritin, and both are crucial in successful blood feeding and reproduction. Ferritin gene silencing by RNA interference caused reduced feeding capacity, low body weight and high mortality after blood meal, decreased fecundity and morphological abnormalities in the midgut cells. Similar findings were also previously reported after silencing of ferritin genes in another hard tick, Ixodes ricinus. Here we demonstrated the role of ferritin in protecting the hard ticks from oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative stress in Hlfer-silenced ticks was performed after blood feeding or injection of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) through detection of the lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein oxidation product, protein carbonyl. FAC injection in Hlfer-silenced ticks resulted in high mortality. Higher levels of MDA and protein carbonyl were detected in Hlfer-silenced ticks compared to Luciferase-injected (control) ticks both after blood feeding and FAC injection. Ferric iron accumulation demonstrated by increased staining on native HlFER was observed from 72 h after iron injection in both the whole tick and the midgut. Furthermore, weak iron staining was observed after Hlfer knockdown. Taken together, these results show that tick ferritins are crucial antioxidant molecules that protect the hard tick from iron-mediated oxidative stress during blood feeding.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    Tomohide Matsuo · Yasuko Tsuge · Rika Umemiya-Shirafuji · Takashi Fujino · Toshihiro Matsui
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    ABSTRACT: The adaptation and immunogenisity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Siberian chipmunks (SC1 strain) in immunocompetent (ICR) mice were examined. The oocysts were received to the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice by repeated passage. The oocysts collected from the 18(th) SCID mice were inoculated to 5 ICR mice. The mice began to shed oocysts from 6 days after inoculation, the patency was 5 days, and the maximum oocysts per gram of feces (OPG) value was 10(4). The maximum of OPG value was gradually increased by successive passage, and finally that in the 22(nd) mice reached 10(6) (patency: 11 days). It is considered that these results indicate completion of their adaptation to ICR mice. To examine the immunogenicity of C. parvum to ICR mice, 8 groups of 5 mice each were inoculated with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts of SC1 strain, which were collected after adaptation to SCID mice. All groups shed oocysts from 6(th) day, and their patency was from 8 to 12 days. On the 21(st) day after the primary infection, these mice were challenged with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts. No oocysts shed from any groups, although 2 control groups shed oocysts from the 6(th) day, and their OPG values were more than 10(6). These results suggest that this strain has strong immunogenicity against ICR mice. Therefore, the immunological healthy mice were considered a useful experimental model to investigate immunological and drug treatments in the strain of C. parvum.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Acta Parasitologica
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    ABSTRACT: Ticks are obligate hematophagous arthropods with unique life cycles characterized by relatively short feeding periods and long non-feeding periods. They ambush a suitable host animal while staying in a pasture without any food source for up to several months. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying their exceptional viability, we focused on autophagy, a proteolysis system via the lysosomes that is induced by starvation in eukaryotes. We hypothesized that starved conditions facilitate autophagy during host-seeking periods in the life cycle of the tick. To date, homologues of five autophagy-related (ATG) genes, ATG3, ATG4, ATG6, ATG8, and ATG12, have been identified from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. We showed previously that the mRNA levels of H. longicornis ATG (HlATG) genes were higher during the non-feeding period than the feeding period in the nymphal to adult stages. In addition, the expressions of HlATG3, HlATG4, HlATG8 and HlATG12 were highest in the egg compared to the other developmental stages in the same tick. In the present study, we used real-time polymerase chain reaction to examine the expression profiles of HlATG genes in the embryonic stage, larval to nymphal stages, and in internal organs of female ticks. We found that the HlATG genes were expressed at the highest levels in developing eggs on day 0 after oviposition. The levels of HlATG4 and HlATG8 were higher during the non-feeding period than the feeding period in the larval to nymphal stages. In the adults, the unfed condition appeared to be associated with the increased expression of HlATG genes in the fat body and midgut, which are nutrient storage organs; however, the expression patterns of HlATG genes varied in other organs. These results suggest that an up-regulation of HlATG genes is not always induced in different organs of unfed female ticks. Taken together, our findings raise the new possibility that HlATG genes play distinct biological roles in eggs, unfed ticks, engorged ticks (metamorphosis), and in each organ.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Veterinary Parasitology
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    ABSTRACT: Haemaphysalis longicornis is known as one of the most important ticks transmitting Babesia parasites in East Asian countries, including Babesia ovata and Babesia gibsoni, as well as Theileria parasites. H. longicornis is not the natural vector of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. Vector ticks and transmitted parasites are thought to have established unique host-parasite interaction for their survival, meaning that vector ticks may have defensive molecules for the growth control of parasites in their bodies. However, the precise adaptation mechanism of tick-Babesia parasites is still unknown. Recently, cyclophilin A (CyPA) was reported to be important for the development of Babesia parasites in ticks. To reveal a part of their adaptation mechanism, the current study was conducted. An injection of B. bovis-infected RBCs into adult female H. longicornis ticks was found to upregulate the expression profiles of the gene and protein of CyPA in H. longicornis (HlCyPA). In addition, recombinant HlCyPA (rHlCyPA) purified from Escherichia coli exhibited significant inhibitory growth effects on B. bovis and B. bigemina cultivated in vitro, without any hemolytic effect on bovine RBCs at all concentrations used. In conclusion, our results suggest that HlCyPA might play an important role in the growth regulation of Babesia parasites in H. longicornis ticks, during natural acquisition from an infected host. Furthermore, rHlCyPA may be a potential alternative chemotherapeutic agent against babesiosis.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · Parasitology Research
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    ABSTRACT: Ticks are obligate hematophagous parasites and important vectors of diseases. The large amount of blood they consume contains great quantities of iron, an essential but also toxic element. The function of ferritin, an iron storage protein, and iron metabolism in ticks need to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the function a newly identified secreted ferritin from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlFER2), together with the previously identified intracellular ferritin (HlFER1). Recombinant ferritins, expressed in Escherichia coli, were used for anti-serum preparation and also assayed for iron-binding activity. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses of different organs and developmental stages of the tick during blood feeding were performed. The localization of ferritins in different organs was demonstrated through an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. RNA interference (RNAi) was performed to evaluate the importance of ferritin on blood feeding and reproduction of ticks. The midgut was also examined after RNAi using light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). RT-PCR showed differences in gene expression in some organs and developmental stages. Interestingly, only HlFER2 was detected in the ovary during oviposition and in egg despite the low mRNA transcript. RNAi induced reduced post-blood meal body weight, high mortality, and decreased fecundity. The expression of vitellogenin genes were affected by silencing of ferritin. Abnormalities in digestive cells, including disrupted microvilli, and alteration of digestive activity were also observed. Taken altogether, our results showed that the iron storage and protective functions of ferritin are critical to successful blood feeding and reproduction of H. longicornis.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Journal of Experimental Biology
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    ABSTRACT: Transferrin is known to be an iron transporter in vertebrates and several arthropods. Iron from host blood is essential for ovarian development in blood-sucking arthropods. However, tick transferrin has been identified in only a few species, and its function has yet to be elucidated, resulting in incomplete understanding of iron metabolism in ticks. Here, we investigated the transfer of host-derived transferrin in the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis using immunological methods. Western blot showed that host-derived transferrin was maintained in all developmental stages of ticks up to 28 days after engorgement and was detected in the midgut and the ovary of adult females following blood feeding. However, no host-derived transferrin was detected in eggs after laying or in larvae after hatching, indicating that host-derived transferrin is not transferred to offspring transovarially. Indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing showed the localization of host-derived transferrin in digestive cells of the midgut and oocytes of the ovary from engorged adult females. These results suggest that host-derived transferrin is transferred to the ovary through the midgut and the hemolymph, and raise the possibility of the function of host-derived transferrin as an iron source in the ovary, providing additional insight on iron metabolism in ticks.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Vitellogenin (Vg) synthesis, vitellogenesis, is an essential process for the development and reproduction of ticks. Our previous finding led to the hypothesis that target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway is important for vitellogenesis in the hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. The TOR pathway controls cellular activity according to nutrient availability in eukaryotes. TOR, a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase family, is a central player in this pathway. Here, we present preliminary evidence that H. longicornis TOR (HlTOR) controls vitellogenesis via activation of S6 kinase (S6K) in the fat body. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing of HlTOR was undertaken to elucidate the involvement of HlTOR in the vitellogenesis of the tick. HlTOR-RNAi caused inhibition of S6K phosphorylation in the fat body. HlTOR-RNAi also altered not only the expression levels of GATA mRNA and protein but also the intracellular localisation of GATA in the fat body. The expression levels of Vg mRNA and protein in the fat body of HlTOR-RNAi ticks were significantly lower than those in control ticks. In the pre-ovipositional stage, the ovaries of control ticks had brown oocytes developing, but those of HlTOR-RNAi ticks were white and immature. The haemolymph colour indicated that the amount of Vg was lower in HlTOR-RNAi ticks than in the controls. Furthermore, rapamycin inhibited S6K phosphorylation and reduced the expression levels of Vg mRNA and protein in the fat bodies. Vg proteins were not detected in rapamycin-treated fat bodies in the presence of 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results suggest that HlTOR activity is critical for vitellogenesis stimulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · International journal for parasitology
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    ABSTRACT: 4E-BP, an eIF4E-binding protein, is well known as a cap-dependent translation inhibitor. Here, the 4E-BP homolog, Hl4E-BP, was isolated and identified from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Hl4E-BP transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in the active stages, including the larvae, nymphs, and female adults, and the transcription levels were found to be higher in unfed than engorged ticks. In contrast, the expression levels of non-phosphorylated Hl4E-BP, which is a 13.4-kDa protein detected by the anti-recombinant Hl4E-BP antibody, were the highest in engorged ticks and significantly decreased progressively during the unfed starvation period of ticks. The functional role of Hl4E-BP as a metabolic brake was verified by histochemical observations on the lipid storage in midguts and fat bodies during the starvation period using ticks injected with dsHl4E-BP. The results indicate that Hl4E-BP is highly relevant to the lipid storage of ticks during the non-feeding starvation period. Our results suggest, for the first time, that Hl4E-BP may have a crucial role in the starvation resistance of ticks in an off-host condition via lipid metabolism control, although it was unclear whether Hl4E-BP might be involved in lipid synthesis regulation and/or lipid consumption inhibition.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012 · Parasitology Research
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Autophagy
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Autophagy
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Autophagy
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    ABSTRACT: Ixodid ticks transmit various pathogens of deadly diseases to humans and animals. However, the specific molecule that functions in the recognition and control of pathogens inside ticks is not yet to be identified. Class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) participates in internalization of apoptotic cells, certain bacterial and fungal pathogens, and modified low-density lipoproteins. Recently, we have reported on recombinant HlSRB, a 50-kDa protein with one hydrophobic SRB domain from the hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. Here, we show that HlSRB plays vital roles in granulocyte-mediated phagocytosis to invading Escherichia coli and contributes to the first-line host defense against various pathogens. Data clearly revealed that granulocytes that up-regulated the expression of cell surface HlSRB are almost exclusively involved in hemocyte-mediated phagocytosis for E. coli in ticks, and post-transcriptional silencing of the HlSRB-specific gene ablated the granulocytes' ability to phagocytose E. coli and resulted in the mortality of ticks due to high bacteremia. This is the first report demonstrating that a scavenger receptor molecule contributes to hemocyte-mediated phagocytosis against exogenous pathogens, isolated and characterized from hematophagous arthropods.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · PLoS ONE

Publication Stats

2k Citations
141.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2016
    • Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine
      • National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases
      Obibiro, Hokkaido, Japan
  • 2008-2014
    • Kagoshima University
      • • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
      • • Faculty of Agriculture
      • • Department of Veterinary Medicine
      Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 2012
    • University of Michigan
      • Life Sciences Institute
      Ann Arbor, MI, United States