Manabu Ikeda

Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan

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Publications (129)269.96 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Caregiver burden (CB) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Taiwan is becoming an urgent social issue as well as that in Japan. The comparison of CB may explain how caregiver feels burden in each country. Methods: The participants were 343 outpatients with AD and their caregivers of Japan (n = 230) and Taiwan (n = 113). We assessed the CB using the Japanese and Chinese version of Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview (ZBI). The initial analysis was an exploratory factor analysis for each group to confirm the factor structure of ZBI. Then, the multiple-group structural equation modeling (MG-SEM) was used to assess the measurement invariance of ZBI such as configural, metric, and scalar invariances. Lastly, we compared the latent factor means of the ZBI between Japan and Taiwan. Results: In both groups, the confirmatory factor analysis extracted 3 factors which were labeled "Impact on caregiver's life", "Embarrassed/anger", and "Dependency". The MG-SEM indicated an acceptable model fit, and established the partial scalar measurement invariance (comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.901, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.066). When we compared the latent factor means, the score of "Impact on caregiver's life" in Taiwanese caregivers was significantly higher than that in Japanese (p = 0.001). However, "Dependency" in Taiwanese caregivers was lower than that in Japanese (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Partial measurement invariance allowed comparing the latent factor mean across two countries. The results of comparisons suggested that there may be differences in the way of feeling CB between Japan and Taiwan.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · International Psychogeriatrics
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    ABSTRACT: Background/aims: To evaluate the adequacy of using the consensus diagnostic criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) to recruit patients with homogeneous characteristics in future clinical trials, where multiple departments of multinational centres are expected to participate with a long enrolment period, and additionally, to contribute to the possible future criteria revision. Methods: Using data from 2 trials of donepezil for DLB, conducted 3 years apart, characteristics in patients with probable DLB were analysed and compared between studies and between psychiatric and neurological centres. Results: In 273 patients (phase II: 135, phase III: 138; psychiatric: 73, neurological: 184), clinical characteristics overall were very similar between studies, and between specialty centres, excluding distinctive parkinsonism in the neurological versus psychiatric centres: incidence of parkinsonism (91.8 vs. 71.2%, p < 0.001), Hoehn and Yahr stage (III: 55.0 vs. 21.2%, p < 0.001), and concomitant anti-Parkinson medication (24.5 vs. 11.0%, p = 0.017). Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, depression, and delusion, suggestive or supportive features, were observed in 35-40%. Additionally, a high prevalence (55.3%) of anxiety was observed. Conclusion: Employing the consensus criteria is adequate to enrol homogeneous DLB patients into future clinical trials regardless of the specialty of centres and time. Further discussion could involve adding anxiety to future criteria.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: The long-term efficacy and safety of donepezil 10 mg in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) were investigated in a 52-week Phase 3 trial. This 52-week study consisted of 16-week randomized placebo-controlled (RCT) and 36-week open-label extension phases. Of 142 DLB patients enrolled in the RCT phase (three arms: placebo, 5 mg, and 10 mg), 110 entered the extension phase. The placebo group of the RCT phase initiated active treatment at week 16, and the active groups maintained allocated treatment and dosages until week 24. After week 24, all patients received 10 mg. Dose reduction to 5 mg for safety concerns was allowed. Efficacy measures included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for cognitive function and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) for behavioral symptoms. Safety evaluations included adverse events (AEs) and the unified Parkinson disease rating scale. In total, 100 subjects completed the study. Cognitive function improvement was sustained for 52 weeks (MMSE at week 52 in 10 mg: 2.8 ± 3.5 (mean ± standard deviation); P <0.001, Student paired t test)). Those who received placebo in the RCT phase showed an improvement after starting active treatment. NPI improved in all the groups throughout the study, including the placebo period. In the subgroup of the 5 mg group without remarkable cognitive or behavioral improvement at week 24, further improvement was observed after a dose increase to 10 mg. After week 24, 21 patients experienced dose reduction. The incidence of any AEs did not increase over time. The long-term administration of donepezil at 10 mg/day improved cognitive function for up to 52 weeks in patients with DLB without increasing the risk of clinically significant safety events. NCT01278407. Trial registration date: January 14, 2011.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Alzheimer's Research and Therapy
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between violence and neurocognitive function in schizophrenia is unclear. We examined the backgrounds and neurocognitive functions of violent and nonviolent patients with schizophrenia to identify factors associated with serious violence. Thirty male patients with schizophrenia who were hospitalized after committing serious violent acts were compared with 24 hospitalized male patients with schizophrenia and no history of violence. We evaluated psychiatric symptoms using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and neurocognitive functions using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS)-Japanese version. Repeated-measures analyses of variance on BACS subcomponents z-scores showed that the violent and control groups had different neuropsychological profiles at trend level (p = 0.095). Post hoc analyses of variance indicated that the violent group had significantly better working memory and executive function than the control group. In post hoc ANOVAs also controlling for the effect of the presence of substance abuse on cognitive function, violent or nonviolent group had a significant main effect on executive function but not on working memory. Patient with violent or non-violent schizophrenia have distinct neuropsychological profiles. These results may help develop improved psychosocial treatments.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Annals of General Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: Various eating-related problems are commonly observed among people with dementia, and these problems place a huge burden on the caregivers. An appropriate classification of these problems is important to understand their underlying mechanisms and to develop a therapeutic approach for managing them. The aim of this study is to develop a possible classification of eating-related problems and to reveal the background factors affecting each of these problems across various conditions causing dementia. Methods: The participants were 208 institutionalized patients with a diagnosis of dementia. Care staff were asked to report all kinds of eating-related problems that they observed. After the nurses' responses were analyzed, 24 items relating to eating-related problems were extracted. A factor analysis of these 24 items was conducted, followed by a logistic regression analysis to investigate the independent variables that most affected each of the eating-related factors. Results: Four factors were obtained. Factor 1 was overeating, factor 2 was swallowing problems, factor 3 was decrease in appetite, and factor 4 was obsession with food. Each factor was associated with different background variables including the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, Clinical Dementia Ratings (CDR), and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Conclusion: This study suggested that eating-related problems are common across conditions causing dementia and should be separately considered in order to understand their underlying mechanisms.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Findings of urban-rural differences in the prevalence of depression have been controversial, and few reports have directly compared the related factors of depression between urban and rural areas. The present study aimed to investigate differences between urban and rural areas in Japan with regards to the prevalence of and related factors of depression in middle-aged adults, in order to further understanding of the features of depression in this demographic. Methods: We used a multistage, random sampling procedure and mailing method. In total, 5000 participants were recruited from urban and rural areas in Kumamoto Prefecture (2500 in each area). Participants were aged from 40 to 64 years. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Results: The prevalence of middle-aged depression was not different between the urban and rural areas. Logistic regression analysis found that being female, living alone, and having a chronic illness were significantly associated with depression in urban-dwelling middle-aged adults. Younger age, sleep disturbance, and financial strain were significantly associated with depression in both urban and rural areas. Limitations: The definition of depression was based on CES-D scores, without corroborating clinical evaluation. Conclusions: We found no marked differences in the prevalence of middle-aged depression between the urban and rural areas. Some related factors of depression in middle-aged adults differed between urban and rural areas in Japan. Effective intervention programs for middle-aged adults with depression should consider regional differences.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) manifest various impairments in eating behavior. However, few previous studies have directly investigated the gustatory function of AD patients, and results have been inconsistent. Methods: Thirty-two AD patients (Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) 0.5/1/2, respectively 11/15/6 patients) and 22 normal control participants were examined to measure detection and recognition thresholds of the four elemental tastes (sweet, salty, sour, and bitter), and their ability to discriminate between tastes. Effects of demographic and clinical factors (age, sex, histories of alcohol and tobacco consumption, and CDR grade) on gustatory threshold were examined using ordinal logistic regression analysis. Performance was compared between AD and control groups. Results: Total threshold values (the sum of threshold grades for the four tastes) for detection and recognition of tastes were significantly higher in the AD group. Detection thresholds for sweet, salty, and bitter, and recognition thresholds for sweet and sour, were also significantly higher in the AD group. Ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that CDR grade was the only factor that significantly affected both total threshold values. Regarding taste discrimination, there were no significant differences between the AD group and control group. Conclusions: These findings suggest that progression of dementia severity accompanies gustatory decline. Although it seemingly paradoxical, weight loss and preference for sweet tastes are frequently, often simultaneously, observed in AD. Gustatory dysfunction may be partially involved in these symptoms. Thus, the nutritional care of patients with AD could be improved by making the taste of meals stronger, while controlling calorie and mineral intake.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International Psychogeriatrics
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    ABSTRACT: Presenteeism refers to impaired performance attributed to attending work with health problems. There has been no study examining the state of presenteeism with objective measures. We compared cerebral hemodynamic changes, measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), during neuropsychological tests conducted by university students with presenteeism and healthy controls. Twenty-two university students participated in the study; 11 of them with impaired performance caused by mental health problem were allocated to the presenteeism group and 11 without health problems to the control group. Presenteeism was assessed by the Presenteeism Scale for Students. To evoke hemodynamics changes, the participants completed a Word Fluency Test (WFT) and a Trail Making Test (TMT). The NIRS probes were located over the bilateral prefrontal area. Students with presenteeism had significantly higher incidences of depression than controls. However , there was no significant difference in behavioral performance examinations between the two groups. With regard to hemodynamics changes, the repeated measures analysis of covariance of the NIRS signals revealed significant interactions between group and task activation. Although we observed a significant increase in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration during the WFT among controls (simple main effect; left channel, F(1, 19) = 27.34, P < 0.001; right channel, F(1, 19) = 22.05, P < 0.001), no changes were found in students with presenteeism during either the WFT (simple main effect; left channel, F(1, 19) = 0.12, P < 0.732; right channel, F(1, 19) = 0.08, P < 0.778) or TMT tasks (left channel, t = −0.94, P with Bonferroni correction = 0.745; right channel, t = −2.19, P with Bon-ferroni correction < 0.113). This is the first study to reveal differences in activity in the cerebral cortex associated with presenteeism. The fact that students with presenteeism have prefrontal dysfunction might reinforce the concept of presenteeism.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science
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    ABSTRACT: Eating is one of the most important daily activities in managing patients with dementia. Although various eating disturbance occur as dementia progresses, to our knowledge, most of the studies focused on a part of eating disturbance such as swallowing and appetite. There have been few comprehensive studies including eating habits and food preference in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aims of this study were to investigate almost all eating disturbance and to examine the relationship of eating disturbance to dementia stage in AD. A total of 220 patients with AD and 30 normal elderly (NE) subjects were recruited. Eating disturbance was assessed by a comprehensive questionnaire that had been previously validated. Potential relationships between the characteristics of eating disturbance and dementia stage as classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) were assessed. Overall, 81.4% of patients with AD showed some eating and swallowing disturbance, whereas only 26.7% of the NE subjects had such a disturbance. Even in an early stage, patients with AD had many types of eating disturbance; "Appetite change" was shown in nearly half of the mild AD patients (49.5%). In the moderate stage, the scores of "change of eating habits and food preference" were highest, and in the severe stage "swallowing disturbance" became critical. In AD, the relationship of dementia stage to eating disturbance differs according to the type of eating disturbance. The relationships between various eating disturbance and the severity of dementia should be considered.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of donepezil on extrapyramidal symptoms in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Using pooled datasets from phase 2 and 3, 12-week randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCT, n = 281) and 52-week open-label long-term extension trials (OLE, n = 241) of donepezil in DLB, the effects of donepezil on the incidence of extrapyramidal adverse events (AEs) and on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III were assessed, and potential baseline factors affecting the AEs were explored. The RCT analysis did not show significant differences between the placebo and active (3, 5, and 10 mg donepezil) groups in extrapyramidal AE incidence (3.8 and 6.5%, p = 0.569) and change in the UPDRS (mean ± SD: -0.2 ± 4.3 and -0.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.562). In the OLE analysis (5 and 10 mg donepezil), the incidence did not increase chronologically; all AEs leading to a dose reduction or discontinuation except one were relieved. The UPDRS was unchanged for 52 weeks. An exploratory multivariate logistic regression analysis of the RCTs revealed that donepezil treatment was not a significant factor affecting the AEs. Baseline severity of parkinsonism was a predisposing factor for worsening of parkinsonism without significant interactions between donepezil and baseline severity. DLB can safely be treated with donepezil without relevant worsening of extrapyramidal symptoms, but treatment requires careful attention to symptom progression when administered to patients with relatively severe parkinsonism. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: It is generally thought that people with dementia are not able to attempt suicide because of impaired executive function. Little research is available about suicidal ideation among dementia patients. The present study examines 1) the sociodemographic and clinical features of dementia patients with suicidal ideation and 2) the effect of suicidal ideation on caregiver burden. A total of 634 dementia outpatients and their family caregivers participated in this study. Comparisons of variables were made among three groups: patients with suicidal ideation, patients with depression without suicidal ideation, and patients with neither suicidal ideation nor depression. Data were collected between April 2007 and July 2013. Suicidal ideation was seen in 64 patients (10.1%). Patients with suicidal ideation had a significantly higher rate of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) (P<0.001). Caregivers of patients with suicidal ideation felt a higher caregiver burden, even after adjusting for BPSD score (P<0.01). Suicidal ideation was assessed by interview with caregivers, so we may have overlooked people who had suicidal ideation but did not express it to their caregivers. Suicidal ideation among dementia patients should receive greater attention. Adequate assessment of suicidal ideation and psychological support for both patients with suicidal ideation and their caregivers are needed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common in the clinical manifestation of dementia. Although most patients with dementia exhibit some BPSD during the course of the illness, the association of BPSD with the stage of dementia remains unclear. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the impact of severity of dementia on the expression of BPSD in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ninety-seven patients with DLB and 393 patients with AD were recruited from 8 dementia clinics across Japan. BPSD were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). A relationship between BPSD and dementia stage classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) in each type of dementia was assessed. No significant difference was seen in NPI total score across CDR staging in the DLB group. On the other hand, the NPI total score significantly increased with dementia stage in the AD group. The relationship of dementia stage with the expression of BPSD was different according to the type of dementia. BPSD and dementia stage were correlated in AD subjects, in whom psychiatric symptoms increase as the disease progresses, but not in DLB subjects.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015
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    Mamoru Hashimoto · Shinichi Sakamoto · Manabu Ikeda
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    ABSTRACT: Delusional jealousy is a psychotic syndrome characterized by a belief in the infidelity of one's spouse that reaches delusional intensity. Although delusional jealousy has been described in relation to organic psychosis, little is known concerning the actual role of delusional jealousy in dementia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of delusional jealousy and possible mechanisms whereby delusional jealousy arises in patients with dementia. We studied 208 consecutive outpatients with dementia (diagnosis based on DSM-III-R criteria; mean [SD] age of 77.0 [8.0] years; study period: September 2011-August 2012). Delusional jealousy was defined as a false belief derived from a pathological jealousy that makes the patient believe that his or her spouse is unfaithful. The prevalence of delusional jealousy was compared between Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and vascular dementia. Patients with and without delusional jealousy were compared in terms of general characteristics. In addition, each patient with delusional jealousy and their primary caregivers were interviewed about the clinical features of the syndrome. Of the 208 patients with dementia, 18 (8.7%) showed delusional jealousy. The prevalence of delusional jealousy in patients who had dementia with Lewy bodies (26.3%) was significantly higher than that in patients with Alzheimer's disease (5.5%) (P < .01). There were no significant differences between patients with and without delusional jealousy in regard to gender (P = 1.00), age (P = .81), educational attainment (P = .29), presence of other persons living with the couple (P = .22), and Mini-Mental State Examination score (P = .47). On the other hand, delusional jealousy was preceded by the onset of serious physical diseases in nearly half of the patients. Delusional jealousy resolved within 12 months after treatment in 15 of 18 patients (83%). Although delusional jealousy is a considerable problem in dementia, the prognosis of delusional jealousy in demented patients appears to be relatively benign. In dementia, delusional jealousy may develop more easily in patients who have dementia with Lewy bodies and those with coexisting serious physical disorders. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015 · The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
  • Mamoru Hashimoto · Manabu Ikeda
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), including subcortical lacunar infarcts (lacunes) and white matter hyperintensities (WMH), is commonly observed on MRI of elderly individuals with and without dementia. SVD is frequently observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the association between SVD and clinical symptoms exhibited by patients with AD remains unclear. Our recent studies suggest that cerebral SVD observed on CT/MRI of patients with AD is associated with delusions and delirium as well as depression. Mechanisms underlying these psychiatric symptoms in patients with AD remain unclear.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyū no shinpo
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study was conducted to clarify the utility of patient-held records as an integrated care approach for patients with dementia in the community. Method: We analyzed the family-held/patient-held records of patients with dementia in the community. The inclusion criteria in the study were as follows: 1) patient-held/family member-held records of patients with dementia in the community; 2) patient-held records designed to share information across different professionals, direct-care staff members, and local government staff; and 3) the continuous participation of psychiatrists in the development and use of the patient-held records. Results: We identified eight sets of family-held/patient-held records in Japanese communities of various sizes, all of which were aimed at integrating information from various services, including information provided by medical and psychiatric professionals to the family and patient. Innovative tools have been available in the areas of the hopes and preferences of the patient, medication and monitoring, sharing information, and the use of information technology. Conclusion and Discussion: Family-held/patient-held records have potential as a tool to enhance the integrated care of people with dementia in the community.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Open Journal of Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: The features of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are influenced by dementia stage. In early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), the association between BPSD and dementia stage remains unclear because of the difficulty of recruiting subjects with a wide range of disease severity. We used a combination of community-based and hospital-based approaches to investigate the relationship between dementia severity and BPSD in EOAD patients. Sixty-three consecutive EOAD outpatients and 29 EOAD patients from a community-based survey were divided into three dementia severity groups according to the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR): mild (CDR 0.5-1, n = 55), moderate (CDR 2, n = 17), and severe (CDR 3, n = 20). BPSD were rated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Scores of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory subscales agitation, euphoria, apathy, disinhibition, irritability, and aberrant motor behaviour increased significantly with increased dementia severity. Hallucinations were greater in the moderate group than in the mild group. For delusions, depression, and anxiety, no significant differences were observed among the three severity groups. The pattern of apathy, agitation, disinhibition, irritability, and aberrant motor behaviour worsening with severity progression in EOAD is similar to the pattern in late-onset Alzheimer's disease. In contrast, hallucinations, depression, and anxiety showed different patterns in EOAD. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Psychogeriatrics
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    ABSTRACT: Assessing driving aptitude in dementia patients is critically important for both patient and public safety. However, there have been only a few reports on the driving behaviours and accident risk of patients with dementia, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Therefore, we compared the characteristics of driving behaviours in patients with FTLD and those with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The subjects were 28 FTLD and 67 AD patients who visited the Department of Psychiatry, Kochi Medical School Hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews with their families and caregivers about traffic accident history and changes in patient driving behaviours after dementia onset and then compared the findings between the two groups. Overall changes in driving behaviours were reported in 89% (25/28) and 76% (51/67) of the FTLD and AD patients, respectively (P = 0.17). In the FTLD group, difficulty in judging inter-vehicle distances, ignoring road signs and traffic signals, and distraction were reported in 50% (14/28), 61% (17/28), and 50% (14/28) of patients, respectively, and 75% (21/28) patients had caused a traffic accident after dementia onset. The risk of causing an accident was higher in the FTLD group than in the AD group (odds ratio = 10.4, 95% confidence interval = 3.7-29.1). In addition, the mean duration between dementia onset and a traffic accident was 1.35 years in the FTLD group compared with 3.0 years in the AD group (P < 0.01). Patients with FTLD were more likely to show dangerous driving behaviours than those with AD, and the risk of causing a traffic accident may be higher in patients with FTLD from an early disease stage. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Psychogeriatrics
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    ABSTRACT: Post-stroke depression (PSD) is a serious and common complication of stroke. In this prospective study on the relationship between clinical PSD and physical recovery, we focused on (1) distinguishing between depression and apathy, (2) issues in assessment of PSD, and (3) timing of assessment. Japanese stroke patients (n=117) were studied. We used self-rating scales [Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) for depression; Apathy Scale (AS) for apathy] and observer-rating scales [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) for depression; Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home (NPI-NH) for apathy] to assess psychological state. We assessed physical disability using the Functional Independence Measurement (FIM). Two-way analysis of covariance was used to determine effects of depression and apathy on functional outcome. We evaluated PSD twice, within 10 days after hospitalization and four weeks later. Objective scales gave higher prevalence than subjective scales for both depression and apathy. A significant effect of apathy on FIM recovery was seen with objective scale assessment during hospitalization; there was a marginal effect of depression at the same time. We did not consider the stroke size and location. In addition, we excluded patients with severe comprehension deficits or with a history of stroke. Our findings indicate that depression and apathy could occur independently after stroke and could individually influence functional recovery. We obtained more accurate estimates of functional recovery using objective measures. Furthermore, our findings suggest that depression and apathy should be assessed not only at admission but also during hospitalization to estimate and enhance the functional recovery of stroke patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is widely associated with cognitive impairment and language problems. KS patients may also exhibit psychiatric symptoms. We present the case of an 18-year-old man with KS who experienced rapidly repeating relapses of manic episodes. He was unresponsive to the usual pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorders such as mood stabilizers and second-generation antipsychotics. Mood was eventually improved with testosterone therapy in addition to pharmacotherapy, with no relapse of manic episodes for 3years after discharge. Testosterone therapy may prevent relapsing manic episodes of bipolar disorder in patients with KS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · General Hospital Psychiatry
  • Mamoru Hashimoto · Ryuji Fukuhara · Manabu Ikeda
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Hirotaka Tanabe was a Japanese neuropsychiatrist engaged in neuropsychological research on cerebrovascular disease and dementia. He contributed widely to the symptomatology of dementia, especially in the field of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). He focused on clarifying the clinical features of a language disturbance, termed Gogi-aphasia by Imura (1943), in 7 patients with anterior temporal circumscribed atrophy. He attributed the nature of Gogi-aphasia to a selective impairment of semantic memory for words and proposed that the pathological process of lobar atrophy with temporal predominance might affect the semantic memory system. In addition, he described in detail the behavioral symptoms of FTD. In his later years, he adovocated a neuropsychological approach to psychiatry.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyū no shinpo

Publication Stats

1k Citations
269.96 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Kumamoto University
      • • Department of Neuropsychiatry
      • • Department of Psychiatry and Neuropathobiology
      Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan
  • 2000-2007
    • Ehime University
      • Department of Neuropsychiatry
      Matuyama, Ehime, Japan