Stephen Tisch

St. Vincent's Hospital Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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Publications (45)219.47 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Laryngeal dystonia is a movement disorder of the muscles within the larynx, which most commonly manifests as spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Rarer reported manifestations include dystonic respiratory stridor and dyscoordinate breathing. Laryngeal dystonia has been treated successfully with botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) injections since 1984. We reviewed prospectively collected data in a consecutive series of 193 patients with laryngeal dystonia who were seen at St. Vincent's Hospital between 1991 and 2011. Patient data were analyzed in Excel, R, and Prism. Laryngeal dystonia manifested as SD (92.7%), stridor (11.9%), dystonic cough (6.2%), dyscoordinate breathing (4.1%), paroxysmal hiccups (1.6%), and paroxysmal sneezing (1.6%). There were more women (68.4%) than men (31.6%), and the average age at onset was 47 years. A positive family history of dystonia was present in 16.1% of patients. A higher incidence of extra-laryngeal dystonia (ie, torticollis and blepharospasm) and concurrent manifestations of laryngeal dystonia were present in patients with dystonic cough, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal sneezing, and hiccups than in other patients (P = 0.003 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The average starting dose of BTX decreased from 2.3 to 0.5 units between 1991 and 2011. The median treatment rating was excellent across all subgroups. Patients with adductor SD, stridor, extra-laryngeal dystonia and male patients had relatively better treatment outcomes. Technical failures were rare (1.1%). Dysphonia secondary to vocal cord paresis followed 38.7% of treatments. Laryngeal dystonia manifests predominantly as SD, but other manifestations include stridor, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal cough, hiccups, and sneezing. BTX injections are very effective across all subgroups. Severe adverse events are rare. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Movement Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Functional Popliteal Entrapment Syndrome (FPES) is caused by compression of neurovascular structures in the popliteal fossa by hypertrophic muscles, provoking severe leg pain with exercise. Treatment is limited to myotomy of hypertrophic musculature. 8 FPES patients underwent imaging and exercise studies, before receiving botulinum toxin A injections (BTX-A) into the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. 81.3 % of patients reported clinical improvement on follow-up, and pathological ankle-brachial indices were normalized. BTX-A injection may present a new, safe, effective and non-invasive approach to FPES.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Journal of Neural Transmission
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    Timothy Ross Lukins · Stephen Tisch · Benjamin Jonker
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    ABSTRACT: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most promising neuromodulatory techniques to gain momentum over the last 20years, with significant evidence showing the benefit of DBS for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, many questions still exist pertaining to the optimal placement of stimulation contacts. This paper aims to review the latest and most relevant studies evaluating subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) stimulation. Additionally, it aims to shine a light on several of the lesser-known targets with mounting evidence of efficacy. Referenced literature for the main body of the article was gathered from Medline and PubMed databases. Results were limited to "full text", "English language" and publications from 1999 onwards. Case reports were excluded. The current evidence irrefutably demonstrates the benefits of both STN and GPi DBS on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III motor scores, with very similar outcomes seen after 1-2years. Currently, it appears the greatest differences lie in the associated adverse effects. STN DBS was associated with a greater reduction in dopamine replacement therapy, but also appeared to have more negative effects on speech and mood. Meanwhile, in regards to alternative targets, the pedunculopontine nucleus has shown promising improvement in axial symptoms, while the ventral intermediate nucleus has demonstrated significant efficacy at suppressing tremor, and the caudal zona incerta may be superior to the STN and GPi in improving UPDRS-III scores. Due to the complexity of Parkinson's disease, an individual disease profile must be determined in a patient-by-patient fashion such that appropriate targets can be selected accordingly.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of Clinical Neuroscience
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effect of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in dystonia on cognition, mood, and quality of life and also assessed if DYT1 gene status influenced cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Fourteen patients with primary generalized dystonia (PGD) were assessed, measuring their estimated premorbid and current IQ, memory for words and faces, and working memory, language, executive function, and sustained attention, one month before and one year or more after surgery. Changes in mood and behaviour and quality of life were also assessed. There was a significant improvement of dystonia with GPi-DBS (69 % improvement in Burke-Fahn-Marsden score, p < 0.0001). Performance on five cognitive tests either improved or declined at post-surgical follow-up. Calculation of a reliable change index suggested that deterioration in sustained attention on the PASAT was the only reliable change (worse after surgery) in cognition with GPi-DBS. DYT1 gene status did not influence cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Depression, anxiety and apathy were not significantly altered, and ratings of health status on the EQ5D remained unchanged. In our sample, GPi-DBS was only associated with an isolated deficit on a test of sustained attention, confirming that GPi-DBS in PGD is clinically effective and safe, without adverse effects on the main domains of cognitive function. The dissociation between GPi-DBS improving dystonia, but not having a significant positive impact on the patients' QoL, warrants further investigation.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: To better define the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the development of the novel facial-onset sensory and motor neuronopathy (FOSMN) syndrome and, in particular, to determine whether neurodegenerative processes, mediated by excitotoxicity, or autoimmune mechanisms contribute to the development of FOSMN syndrome. Clinical, laboratory, neurophysiologic, and pathologic assessments were undertaken for 5 patients with FOSMN syndrome (3 male and 2 female), the largest cohort of FOSMN syndrome reported to date. In addition to conventional neurophysiologic studies, novel threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques were undertaken to assess for the presence of cortical excitability. Clinically, all patients exhibited the typical FOSMN syndrome phenotype, heralded by facial-onset sensory deficits with subsequent development of motor deficits evolving in a rostral-caudal direction. Pathologic studies, including an autopsy, disclosed widespread degeneration of sensory and motor neurons with no evidence of inflammation, amyloid deposition, or intraneuronal inclusions, such as TDP-43, Bunina bodies, or ubiquitin inclusions. Conventional neurophysiologic studies revealed abnormalities of blink reflexes, along with features of motor and sensory neuronopathy. Threshold tracking TMS disclosed normal cortical excitability in patients with FOSMN syndrome, with preserved short-interval intracortical inhibition, resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential amplitude, and cortical silent period duration. Patients with FOSMN syndrome failed to respond to immunomodulatory approaches. Findings from the present study suggest that FOSMN syndrome is a primary neurodegenerative disorder of sensory and motor neurons, with distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012 · Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Studies of deep brain stimulation for dystonia have shown significant motor improvement. However, patients' perceptions of surgery and its effects have been less studied. We aimed to explore perceptions of changes in life in patients with primary dystonia after deep brain stimulation. Thirteen patients underwent thematic interviews 8-60 months after pallidal deep brain stimulation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with grounded theory. Patients described a profound impact of dystonia on daily life. After surgery, physical changes with a more upright posture and fewer spasms translated into an easier, more satisfying life with greater confidence. Notwithstanding this positive outcome, the transition from a limited life before surgery to opportunities for a better life exhibited obstacles: The "new life" after deep brain stimulation was stressful, including concern about being dependent on the stimulator as well as having to deal with interfering side effects from deep brain stimulation. The whole coping process meant that patients had to quickly shift focus from struggling to adapt to a slowly progressive disorder to adjustment to a life with possibilities, but also with new challenges. In this demanding transition process, patients wished to be offered better professional guidance and support. Even though deep brain stimulation provides people with primary dystonia with a potential for better mobility and more confidence, patients experienced new challenges and expressed the need for support and counseling after surgery. Grounded theory is a useful method to highlight patients' own experience and contributes to a deeper understanding of the impact of deep brain stimulation on patients with dystonia.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Movement Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Deep brain stimulation to the internal globus pallidus is an effective treatment for primary dystonia. The optimal clinical effect often occurs only weeks to months after starting stimulation. To better understand the underlying electrophysiological changes in this period, we assessed longitudinally 2 pathophysiological markers of dystonia in patients prior to and in the early treatment period (1, 3, 6 months) after deep brain stimulation surgery. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to track changes in short-latency intracortical inhibition, a measure of excitability of GABA(A) -ergic corticocortical connections and long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity (as a response to paired associative stimulation). Deep brain stimulation remained on for the duration of the study. Prior to surgery, inhibition was reduced and plasticity increased in patients compared with healthy controls. Following surgery and commencement of deep brain stimulation, short-latency intracortical inhibition increased toward normal levels over the following months with the same monotonic time course as the patients' clinical benefit. In contrast, synaptic plasticity changed rapidly, following a nonmonotonic time course: it was absent early (1 month) after surgery, and then over the following months increased toward levels observed in healthy individuals. We postulate that before surgery preexisting high levels of plasticity form strong memories of dystonic movement patterns. When deep brain stimulation is turned on, it disrupts abnormal basal ganglia signals, resulting in the absent response to paired associative stimulation at 1 month. Clinical benefit is delayed because engrams of abnormal movement persist and take time to normalize. Our observations suggest that plasticity may be a driver of long-term therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation in dystonia.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · Movement Disorders
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    Neil G Simon · Stephen Tisch · Joga Chaganti · Romesh Markus
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    ABSTRACT: Lasting taste disturbance has been previously reported as a consequence of brainstem infarction, but there are no previous reports of transient gustatory sensations preceding the onset of stroke. Ophthalmodynia, presenting as "salt-and-pepper" eye pain, has been reported rarely. We present a 58-year-old right-handed woman who had fluctuating ophthalmodynia and taste disturbance immediately preceding a left paramedian pontine infarction. We discuss the neuroanatomical basis of taste in reference to this presentation.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2011 · Journal of Clinical Neuroscience
  • Stephen Tisch · Bruce J Brew

    No preview · Article · Oct 2010 · Movement Disorders
  • Patric Blomstedt · Ulrika Sandvik · Stephen Tisch
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the posterior subthalamic area (PSA) as a target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of essential tremor (ET). The ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus is the traditional target for DBS in the treatment of ET. Recent studies have presented beneficial effects of DBS in the PSA in the treatment of tremor. Twenty-one patients with ET were included in this study. All patients were evaluated before and 1 year after surgery, on and off stimulation, using the essential tremor rating scale (ETRS). A marked microlesional effect was noticed in 83%, in some cases obviating the need for electrical stimulation for many months. The total ETRS was reduced from 46.2 at baseline to 18.7 (60%). Item 5/6 (tremor of the upper extremity) was improved from 6.2 to 0.3 (95%), and items 11 to 14 (hand function) from 9.7 to 1.3 (87%) concerning the contralateral hand. Activities of daily living were improved by 66%. No severe complication occurred. Eight patients presented a postoperative mild dysphasia that regressed within days to weeks. DBS in the PSA resulted in a marked reduction of tremor.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2010 · Movement Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty with speech and swallowing, pain and respiratory distress. Several case reports and one case series have been published concerning therapeutic outcome of pallidal deep brain stimulation in dystonia caused by neurodegeneration with brain iron degeneration, reporting mostly favourable outcomes. However, with case studies, there may be a reporting bias towards favourable outcome. Thus, we undertook this multi-centre retrospective study to gather worldwide experiences with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. A total of 16 centres contributed 23 patients with confirmed neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation. Patient details including gender, age at onset, age at operation, genetic status, magnetic resonance imaging status, history and clinical findings were requested. Data on severity of dystonia (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale-Motor Scale, Barry Albright Dystonia Scale), disability (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale-Disability Scale), quality of life (subjective global rating from 1 to 10 obtained retrospectively from patient and caregiver) as well as data on supportive therapy, concurrent pharmacotherapy, stimulation settings, adverse events and side effects were collected. Data were collected once preoperatively and at 2-6 and 9-15 months postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was change in severity of dystonia. The mean improvement in severity of dystonia was 28.5% at 2-6 months and 25.7% at 9-15 months. At 9-15 months postoperatively, 66.7% of patients showed an improvement of 20% or more in severity of dystonia, and 31.3% showed an improvement of 20% or more in disability. Global quality of life ratings showed a median improvement of 83.3% at 9-15 months. Severity of dystonia preoperatively and disease duration predicted improvement in severity of dystonia at 2-6 months; this failed to reach significance at 9-15 months. The study confirms that dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation improves with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation, although this improvement is not as great as the benefit reported in patients with primary generalized dystonias or some other secondary dystonias. The patients with more severe dystonia seem to benefit more. A well-controlled, multi-centre prospective study is necessary to enable evidence-based therapeutic decisions and better predict therapeutic outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2010 · Brain
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate pallidal DBS in a non-DYT1 form of hereditary dystonia. We present the results of pallidal DBS in a family with non-DYT1 dystonia where DYT5 to 17 was excluded. The dystonia is following an autosomal dominant pattern. Ten members had definite dystonia and five had dystonia with minor symptoms. Four patients received bilateral pallidal DBS. Mean age was 47 years. The patients were evaluated before surgery, and "on" stimulation after a mean of 2.5 years (range 1-3) using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden scale (BFM). Mean BFM score decreased by 79 % on stimulation, from 42.5 +/- 24 to 9 +/- 6.5 at the last evaluation. Cervical involvement improved by 89%. The 2 patients with oromandibular dystonia and blepharospasm demonstrated a reduction of 95% regarding these symptoms. The present study confirms the effectiveness of pallidal DBS in a new family with hereditary primary segmental and generalized dystonia.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2009 · Movement Disorders
  • Stephen Tisch · Bruce Brew

    No preview · Article · Sep 2009 · Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: The introduction of thalamotomy in 1954 led naturally to exploration of the underlying subthalamic area, with the development of such procedures as campotomy and subthalamotomy in the posterior subthalamic area. The most popular of these procedures was the subthalamotomy, which was performed in thousands of patients for various movement disorders. Today, in the deep brain stimulation (DBS) era, subthalamic nucleus DBS is the treatment of choice for Parkinson's disease, whereas thalamic and pallidal DBS are mainly used for nonparkinsonian tremor and dystonia, respectively. The interest in DBS in the posterior subthalamic area has been quite limited, however, with a total of 95 patients presented in 14 articles. During recent years, interest has increased, and promising results have been published concerning both Parkinson's disease and nonparkinsonian tremor. We reviewed the literature to investigate the development of surgery in the posterior subthalamic area from the lesional era to the present.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2009 · Neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: Data regarding the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery on the dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS), impulse control disorders (ICDs) and punding in Parkinson's disease (PD) are limited. We present a case series of 21 operated PD patients who had exhibited DDS, ICDs or punding at some stage during the disease. DDS remained unimproved or worsened post-operatively in 12/17 patients with pre-operative DDS (71%) (nine bilateral subthalamic nucleus [STN], one right-sided STN, two bilateral globus pallidus internus [GPi] DBS). DDS improved or resolved after bilateral STN DBS in 5/17 patients with pre-operative DDS. DDS apparently developed for the first time after bilateral STN DBS in two patients, although only after a latency of eight years in one case. One patient without reported pre-operative DDS or ICDs developed pathological gambling post-STN DBS. One patient had pathological gambling which resolved pre-operatively, and did not recur post-DBS. Thus, DDS, ICDs and punding may persist, worsen or develop for the first time after DBS surgery, although a minority of patients improved dramatically. Predictive factors may include physician vigilance, motor outcome and patient compliance.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2009 · Journal of Clinical Neuroscience

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2009 · Journal of Clinical Neuroscience
  • P Blomstedt · A Fytagoridis · S Tisch
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies have described lesional therapy in the posterior subthalamic area (PSA) in the treatment of various movement disorders. Recently, some publications have illustrated the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in this area in patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, MS-tremor, and other forms of tremor. Even though the clinical series is small, the reported benefits prompted us to explore DBS in this area in the treatment of tremor. Five patients with tremor were operated using unilateral DBS of the PSA. Two patients had dystonic tremor, one primary writing tremor, one cerebellar tremor and the other neuropathic tremor. All patients were assessed before and 1 year after surgery using items 5 and 6 (tremor of the upper extremity), 11-14 (hand function), and when appropriate item 10 (handwriting) from the essential tremor rating scale. The mean improvement on stimulation after 1 year was 87%. A pronounced and sustained microlesional effect was seen in several of the patients, and while the mean improvement off stimulation was 56% the reduction in the three patients with the most pronounced effect was 89%. The two patients with dystonic tremor did also become free of the dystonic symptoms and pain in the treated arm. No severe complication occurred. DBS of the PSA in this small group of patients had an excellent effect on the different forms of tremor, except for the neuropathic tremor where the effect was moderate. These preliminary results suggest PSA to be an effective target for the treatment of various forms of tremor. Further studies concerning indications, safety and efficacy of DBS in the posterior subthalamic area are required.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2009 · Acta Neurochirurgica
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    ABSTRACT: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in improving limb symptoms in Parkinson's disease. However, speech shows a variable response. Contact site and amplitude of stimulation have been suggested as possible factors influencing speech. In this double blind study, we assessed 14 patients post bilateral STN-DBS, without medication. Six conditions were studied in random order as follows: stimulation inside the STN at low voltage (2 V) and at high voltage (4 V); above the STN at 2 V and at 4 V, at usual clinical parameters, and off-stimulation. The site of stimulation was defined on the postoperative stereotactic MRI data. Speech protocol consisted of the assessment of intelligibility of the dysarthric speech, maximum sustained phonation, and a 1-minute monologue. Movement was assessed using the UPDRS-III. Stimulation at 4 V significantly reduced the speech intelligibility (P = 0.004) independently from the site of stimulation. Stimulation at 4 V significantly improved the motor function. Stimulation inside the nucleus was significantly more effective than outside the nucleus (P = 0.0006). The significant improvement in movement coupled with significant deterioration in speech intelligibility when patients are stimulated inside the nucleus at high voltage indicates a critical role for electrical stimulation parameters in speech motor control.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2008 · Movement Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Success of DBS is highly dependent on electrode location and electrical parameter settings. The aim of this study was to develop a general method for setting up patient-specific 3D computer models of DBS, based on magnetic resonance images, and to demonstrate the use of such models for assessing the position of the electrode contacts and the distribution of the electric field in relation to individual patient anatomy. A software tool was developed for creating finite element DBS-models. The electric field generated by DBS was simulated in one patient and the result was visualized with isolevels and glyphs. The result was evaluated and it corresponded well with reported effects and side effects of stimulation. It was demonstrated that patient-specific finite element models and simulations of DBS can be useful for increasing the understanding of the clinical outcome of DBS.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2008 · Medical & Biological Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: It is unclear how subthalamic nucleus activity is modulated by the cerebral cortex. Here we investigate the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the cortex on oscillatory subthalamic local field potential activity in the 8-35 Hz (alpha/beta) band, as exaggerated synchronization in this band is implicated in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. We studied nine patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to test whether cortical stimulation can modulate synchronized oscillations in the human subthalamic nucleus. With patients at rest, single-pulse TMS was delivered every 5 s over each primary motor area and supplementary motor area at intensities of 85-115% resting motor threshold. Subthalamic local field potentials were recorded from deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted into this nucleus for the treatment of PD. Motor cortical stimulation suppressed beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus from approximately 0.2 to 0.6 s after TMS (repeated measures anova; main effect of time, P < 0.01; main effect of side, P = 0.03), regardless of intensity. TMS over the supplementary motor area also reduced subthalamic beta activity at 95% (P = 0.05) and 115% resting motor threshold (P = 0.01). The oscillatory activity decreased to 80 +/- 26% of baseline (averaged across sites and stimulation intensities). Suppression with subthreshold stimuli confirmed that these changes were centrally driven and not due to peripheral afference. The results may have implications for mechanisms underlying the reported therapeutic benefits of cortical stimulation.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2008 · European Journal of Neuroscience

Publication Stats

2k Citations
219.47 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009-2014
    • St. Vincent's Hospital Sydney
      • Department of Neurology
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2009-2013
    • St. Vincent Hospital
      Green Bay, Wisconsin, United States
  • 2006-2010
    • University College London
      • • Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders
      • • Institute of Neurology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2005-2008
    • WWF United Kingdom
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • University of London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2007
    • London Research Institute
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom