Fred D. Lakeman

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States

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Publications (42)286.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Children <2 years of age are at high risk of influenza-related mortality and morbidity. However, the appropriate dose of oseltamivir for children <2 years of age is unknown. Methods: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group evaluated oseltamivir in infants aged <2 years in an age-de-escalation, adaptive design with a targeted systemic exposure. Results: From 2006 to 2010, 87 subjects enrolled. An oseltamivir dose of 3.0 mg/kg produced drug exposures within the target range in subjects 0-8 months of age, although there was a greater degree of variability in infants <3 months of age. In subjects 9-11 months of age, a dose of 3.5 mg/kg produced drug exposures within the target range. Six of 10 subjects aged 12-23 months receiving the Food and Drug Administration-approved unit dose for this age group (ie, 30 mg) had oseltamivir carboxylate exposures below the target range. Virus from 3 subjects developed oseltamivir resistance during antiviral treatment. Conclusions: The appropriate twice-daily oral oseltamivir dose for infants ≤8 months of age is 3.0 mg/kg, while the dose for infants 9-11 months old is 3.5 mg/kg.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · The Journal of Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Children under 2 years of age are at high risk of influenza-related mortality and morbidity. However, the appropriate dose of oseltamivir for children under 2 years of age is unknown.Methods. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group evaluated oseltamivir in infants from birth to 2 years of age in an age-deescalation, adaptive design with a targeted systemic exposure.Results. From 2006 to 2010, 87 subjects enrolled. An oseltamivir dose of 3.0&emsp14;mg/kg produced drug exposures within the target range in subjects 0 through 8 months of age, although there was a greater degree of variability in infants under 3 months of age. In subjects 9 through 11 months of age, a dose of 3.5&emsp14;mg/kg produced drug exposures within the target range. Six of ten subjects 12 through 23 months of age receiving the FDA-approved unit dose for this age group of 30&emsp14;mg had oseltamivir carboxylate exposures below the target range. Virus from three subjects developed oseltamivir resistance during antiviral treatment.Conclusions. The appropriate twice-daily oral oseltamivir dose for infants birth through 8 months of age is 3.0&emsp14;mg/kg, while the dose for infants 9 through 11 months is 3.5&emsp14;mg/kg.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · The Journal of Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Rha B, Redden D, Benfield M, Lakeman F, Whitley RJ, Shimamura M. Correlation and clinical utility of pp65 antigenemia and quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays for detection of cytomegalovirus in pediatric renal transplant patients. Abstract: qPCR and pp65 antigenemia assays are used to monitor CMV infection in renal transplant recipients, but correlation of assays in a pediatric population has not been evaluated. Paired CMV real-time qPCR and pp65 antigenemia tests from 882 blood samples collected from 115 pediatric renal transplant recipients were analyzed in this retrospective cohort study for the strength of association and clinical correlates. The assays correlated well in detecting infection (κ = 0.61). Higher qPCR values were demonstrated with increasing levels of antigenemia (p < 0.01). Discordant test results were associated with antiviral treatment (OR 4.33, p < 0.01) and low-level viremia, with odds of concordance increasing at higher qPCR values (OR 3.67, p < 0.01), and no discordance occurring above 8500 genomic equivalents/mL. Among discordant samples, neither test preceded the other in detecting initial infection or in returning to negative while on treatment. Only two cases of disease occurred during the two-yr study period. With strong agreement in the detection of CMV infection, either qPCR or pp65 antigenemia assays can be used effectively for monitoring pediatric renal transplant patients for both detection and resolution of infection.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012 · Pediatric Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Poor neurodevelopmental outcomes and recurrences of cutaneous lesions remain unacceptably frequent among survivors of neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) disease. We enrolled neonates with HSV disease in two parallel, identical, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Neonates with central nervous system (CNS) involvement were enrolled in one study, and neonates with skin, eye, and mouth involvement only were enrolled in the other. After completing a regimen of 14 to 21 days of parenteral acyclovir, the infants were randomly assigned to immediate acyclovir suppression (300 mg per square meter of body-surface area per dose orally, three times daily for 6 months) or placebo. Cutaneous recurrences were treated with open-label episodic therapy. A total of 74 neonates were enrolled--45 with CNS involvement and 29 with skin, eye, and mouth disease. The Mental Development Index of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (in which scores range from 50 to 150, with a mean of 100 and with higher scores indicating better neurodevelopmental outcomes) was assessed in 28 of the 45 infants with CNS involvement (62%) at 12 months of age. After adjustment for covariates, infants with CNS involvement who had been randomly assigned to acyclovir suppression had significantly higher mean Bayley mental-development scores at 12 months than did infants randomly assigned to placebo (88.24 vs. 68.12, P=0.046). Overall, there was a trend toward more neutropenia in the acyclovir group than in the placebo group (P=0.09). Infants surviving neonatal HSV disease with CNS involvement had improved neurodevelopmental outcomes when they received suppressive therapy with oral acyclovir for 6 months. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; CASG 103 and CASG 104 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00031460 and NCT00031447, respectively.).
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2011 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection may lead to acute liver failure (ALF) and the need for emergency liver transplantation (LT). The primary aim of this study was to determine the utility of HSV serological testing and HSV DNA testing by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the diagnosis and management of indeterminate, pregnancy-related, and known HSV-related ALF. Stored sera obtained on study day 1 or 2 from patients enrolled in the United States ALF Study Group with indeterminate (n = 51), pregnancy-related (n = 12), and HSV-related (n = 4) ALF were screened for HSV DNA by PCR and serology. While 7 of the indeterminate and pregnant patients had positive anti-HSV immunoglobulin M, none had detectable HSV DNA. The 4 known HSV cases all had high-titer HSV DNA on presentation (range: 3.5 to 36 x 10(8) copies/mL). Two HSV patients underwent LT but developed posttransplant extrahepatic HSV infection despite suppression of HSV DNA with acyclovir treatment, and one of them eventually died. The 2 other fulminant HSV patients died within 48 hours of presentation. In conclusion, serum HSV DNA indicative of occult HSV infection was not detected in 51 indeterminate and 12 pregnancy-related ALF patients. The 4 patients with known HSV-related ALF all had high HSV DNA levels at presentation, and despite the rapid use of antiviral therapy and emergency LT, substantial morbidity and mortality were encountered, highlighting the poor prognosis with severe disseminated HSV infection.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2008 · Liver Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Intravenous ganciclovir administered for 6 weeks improves hearing outcomes in infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease involving the central nervous system. Twenty-four subjects received antiviral therapy for 6 weeks. Serial pharmacokinetic assessments were performed after administration of valganciclovir oral solution and of intravenous ganciclovir. On the basis of a previous pharmacokinetic study of the use of intravenous ganciclovir in this population, a target AUC12 (area under the concentration-time curve over a 12-h period) of 27 mg x h/L was defined. The median dose of oral valganciclovir administered in the present trial was 16 mg/kg, which produced a geometric mean AUC12 of 27.4 mg x h/L. The bioavailability of valganciclovir was 41.1%. Of the 18 subjects who had detectable CMV in whole blood at baseline or during therapy, 11 had <4 log viral DNA copies/mL at baseline, and 7 had > or =4 log viral DNA copies/mL at baseline; subjects who started the study with the higher viral burden experienced greater decreases in viral load but did not clear virus during the 42-day course of therapy. Neutropenia of grade 3 or 4 developed in 38% of subjects. In neonates with symptomatic congenital CMV disease, valganciclovir oral solution provides plasma concentrations of ganciclovir comparable to those achieved with administration of intravenous ganciclovir. The results of the present study cannot be extrapolated to extemporaneously compounded liquid formulations of valganciclovir.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2008 · The Journal of Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: The spectrum of genital herpes (GH) has been understudied in men, especially African American men. Consecutive men attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic were enrolled in a study of GH epidemiology. Consenting participants answered questionnaires detailing their sexual and social activities and underwent serological testing for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2) and collection of genital swabs for viral detection. Of the 516 men enrolled, 465 (90%) were African American. Antibodies to HSV-1 were present in 315 (61%) of participants, and 233 (45%) had antibodies to HSV-2. Factors associated with HSV-2 infection included older age and African American race. HSV was detected in genital swabs from 52 men; 43 (82.7%) swabs were HSV-2 positive, and 9 (17.3%) were HSV-1 positive. The overall viral shedding rate among men (n = 247) with evidence of GH (HSV-1 or HSV-2 infection) was 21.1%, and the asymptomatic shedding rate in this same group was 5.2%. The sensitivities of culture for detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 were .22 and .58, respectively, compared with that of polymerase chain reaction. Genital HSV infections are common and largely unrecognized among this segment of the population. HSV-1 infection constitutes a nontrivial proportion of GH in these men.
    Preview · Article · May 2006 · The Journal of Infectious Diseases
  • B. Rodu · F. Lakeman
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the in vitro virucidal activity of soluble components of a topical film-forming medication, Zilactin®, against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Using a standard plaque reduction assay, a 1:10 dilution of the experimental liquid resulted in total destruction of infectious HSV-1. The phenomenon could not be explained by ethanol concentration or lowering of pH, both of which had no effect on control samples. As employed in this assay, Zilactin diluted 1:10 did not demonstrate cyctotoxicity to the cell monolayer system. The implications of these findings on the design and implementation of clinical trials are discussed, with special reference made to the restrictions imposed by the natural history of clinical lesions caused by HSV-1.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2006 · Journal of Oral Pathology and Medicine
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    Jr J M Sizemore · F Lakeman · R Whitley · A Hughes · E W Hook
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    ABSTRACT: While nearly one in four Americans has antibodies to HSV-2, only one of 40 reports a history of genital herpes (GH). The goal of this study was to correlate questions designed to elicit a GH history with serological evidence of HSV-2 in male STD clinic attendees. Consecutive males were enrolled in a study of the epidemiology of GH. Consenting men answered questionnaires regarding their histories of possible GH and underwent serological testing for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Association statistics between response to each question and HSV-2 serological status were calculated. Of 328 men enrolled, 148 (46%) had HSV-2 antibodies. 14 (4.3%) reported a history of GH when queried as part of a list of other STD (sensitivity (S) 0.08). 17 (5.2%) reported a history of GH when asked directly "Do you have genital herpes?" (S 0.09). 75 (21.1%) participants reported a history of a recurring genital sore, ulcer, or zipper cut (S 0.32). Overall, 64.2% of HSV-2 seropositive men answered "no" to all three questions. A "yes" response to any of the questions was only 36% sensitive for predicting HSV-2 infection. Few HSV-2 infected men report either a history of GH or are aware that they are infected. Asking about a history of recurrent genital sores was a more sensitive historical marker of HSV-2 infection than asking about a history of "genital herpes."
    Preview · Article · Sep 2005 · Sexually Transmitted Infections
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the relationship between the virus burden in infancy and hearing loss in congenital CMV infection. A cohort of 76 infants with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection identified by means of newborn virologic screening was monitored for outcome. The amount of infectious CMV was analyzed in urine specimens obtained during early infancy. Peripheral blood (PB) samples obtained during early infancy were available from 75 children and CMV DNA was quantitated with a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Infants with clinical abnormalities at birth (symptomatic congenital CMV infection) had higher amounts of CMV in urine (P = .005) and CMV DNA in PB (P = .001) than infants with no symptoms. Eight children with and 4 children without symptoms had hearing loss. Among children without symptoms, those with hearing loss had a significantly greater amount of CMV in urine (P = .03) and PB virus burden (P = .02) during infancy than those with normal hearing. Infants with < 5 x 10(3) pfu/mL of urine CMV and infants with < 1 x 10(4) copies/mL of viral DNA in PB were at a lower risk for hearing loss. In children with asymptomatic congenital CMV infection, hearing loss was associated with increased amounts of urine CMV and PB CMV DNA during early infancy.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2005 · Journal of Pediatrics
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    Richard J Whitley · Fred D Lakeman

    Preview · Article · Apr 2005 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Earlier we reported that NF-κB is activated by protein kinase R (PKR) in herpes simplex virus 1-infected cells. Here we report that in PKR−/− cells the yields of wild-type virus are 10-fold higher than in PKR+/+ cells. In cells lacking NF-κB p50 (nfkb1), p65 (relA), or both p50 and p65, the yields of virus were reduced 10-fold. Neither wild-type nor mutant cells undergo apoptosis following infection with wild-type virus. Whereas PKR+/+ and NF-κB+/+ control cell lines undergo apoptosis induced by the d120 (Δα4) mutant of HSV-1, the mutant PKR−/− and NF-κB−/− cell lines were resistant. The evidence suggests that the stress-induced apoptosis resulting from d120 infection requires activation of NF-κB and that this proapoptotic pathway is blocked in cells in which NF-κB is not activated or absent. Activation of NF-κB in the course of viral infection may have dual roles of attempting to curtain viral replication by rendering the cell susceptible to apoptosis induced by the virus and by inducing the synthesis of proteins that enhance viral replication.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2004 · Journal of Virology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The health consequences of circumcision are the subject of controversy. While circumcision appears to reduce risk for HIV acquisition, prior studies exploring associations between circumcision and herpes simplex virus two (HSV-2) infection (or genital herpes) have yielded conflicting results. Methodological limitations have included lack of type specific serological tests for HSV-2, self-reporting of circumcision status, and few non-White study participants. Objectives: To determine whether uncircumcised male STD clinic attendees differ from their circumcised counterparts with regards to HSV-2 serostatus. Methods: In an ongoing study, consecutive heterosexual men presenting for care at a county STD clinic were approached for enrollment. In addition to routine evaluation and treatment, consenting participants answered a detailed questionnaire regarding their sexual history, had circumcision status determined by physical exam, and were tested for antibodies to HSV-2 using Focus Technologies HerpeSelect® ELISA. Results: 250 men have been enrolled to date. 65 (26%) were uncircumcised. 108 (43%) were HSV-2 seropositive. 202 (89%) were Black. In univariate analyses, circumcised and uncircumcised men did not differ with respect to race or total number of sexual partners. Uncircumcised men were more likely to be older (32.3 years (y) vs. 26.3 y, p<0.0004), have an earlier sexual debut (14.7 y vs. 15.5 y, p=0.05), and more years of sexual experience (17.7 y vs. 10.8 y, p<0.0001). Furthermore, uncircumcised men were more likely to be HSV-2 seropositive (57% vs. 43%, OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.20-3.76, p=0.0094) than circumcised participants. Conclusions: Among male STD clinic attendees, uncircumcised men were significantly more likely to be HSV-2 positive than their circumcised counterparts.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Oct 2003
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    ABSTRACT: Enterovirus (EV) meningitis is common in infants and may have neurologic complications. Treatment of older children and adults with pleconaril has been associated with reduced severity and duration of symptoms. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of pleconaril in infants with EV meningitis. Infants < or =12 months old with suspected EV meningitis were randomized 2:1 to receive pleconaril, 5 mg/kg/dose orally three times a day or placebo for 7 days. Evaluations included pharmacokinetic determinations, safety laboratory testing, serial culture and PCR assays and clinical evaluations. Of 21 evaluable subjects 20 were confirmed with EV infection (12 pleconaril, 8 placebo). Among pleconaril-treated subjects 26 of 29 peak and trough pleconaril levels exceeded the 90% inhibitory concentration for EVs. A median 3.5-fold drug accumulation occurred between Days 2 and 7. Pleconaril was well-tolerated, although twice as many adverse events occurred per subject in the pleconaril group. Serial cultures from the oropharynx, rectum and serum had low yield (< or =50%) and positivity generally persisted for <4 days in both groups. Serial PCR assays of culture-negative oropharyngeal and rectal specimens had high positivity rates (generally > or =50%) persisting through Day 14. No significant differences in duration of positivity by culture or PCR, hospitalization or symptoms were detected between groups. The dose of pleconaril studied provided sufficient plasma levels and was well-tolerated; however, drug accumulation was evident. The low yields of serial viral cultures, relatively short and benign clinical courses and the small number of subjects enrolled precluded demonstration of efficacy. If this medication is to be prescribed in infants, surveillance for toxicity related to drug accumulation will be necessary.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2003 · The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) possesses low pathogenic potential in an immunocompetent host. In the immunosuppressed host, however, a wide spectrum of infection outcomes, ranging from asymptomatic to life threatening, can follow either primary or nonprimary infection. The variability in the manifestations of HCMV infection in immunosuppressed individuals implies that there is a threshold of host antiviral immunity that can effectively limit disease potential. We used a nonhuman primate model of CMV infection to assess the relationship between CMV disease and the levels of developing anti-CMV immunity. Naive rhesus macaques were inoculated with rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) followed 2 or 11 weeks later by inoculation with pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239. Two of four monkeys inoculated with SIV at 2 weeks after inoculation with RhCMV died within 11 weeks with simian AIDS (SAIDS), including activated RhCMV infection. Neither animal had detectable anti-SIV antibodies. The other two animals died 17 and 27 weeks after SIV inoculation with either SAIDS or early lymphoid depletion, although no histological evidence of activated RhCMV was observed. Both had weak anti-SIV antibody titers. RhCMV antibody responses for this group of monkeys were significantly below those of control animals inoculated with only RhCMV. In addition, all animals of this group had persistent RhCMV DNA in plasma and high copy numbers of RhCMV in tissues. In contrast, animals that were inoculated with SIV at 11 weeks after RhCMV infection rarely exhibited RhCMV DNA in plasma, had low copy numbers of RhCMV DNA in most tissues, and did not develop early onset of SAIDS or activated RhCMV. SIV antibody titers were mostly robust and sustained in these monkeys. SIV inoculation blunted further development of RhCMV humoral responses, unlike the normal pattern of development in control monkeys following RhCMV inoculation. Anti-RhCMV immunoglobulin G levels and avidity were slightly below control values, but levels maintained were higher than those observed following SIV infection at 2 weeks after RhCMV inoculation. These findings demonstrate that SIV produces long-lasting insults to the humoral immune system beginning very early after SIV infection. The results also indicate that anti-RhCMV immune development at 11 weeks after infection was sufficient to protect the host from acute RhCMV sequelae following SIV infection, in contrast to the lack of protection afforded by only 2 weeks of immune response to RhCMV. As previously observed, monkeys that were not able to mount a significant immune response to SIV were the most susceptible to SAIDS, including activated RhCMV infection. Rapid development of SAIDS in animals inoculated with SIV 2 weeks after RhCMV inoculation suggests that RhCMV can augment SIV pathogenesis, particularly during primary infection by both viruses.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2002 · Journal of Virology
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this investigation was to establish the safety of high-dose (HD) acyclovir for the treatment of neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) disease. In addition, an estimate of therapeutic efficacy was sought, both with respect to mortality and to morbidity. Virologic efficacy of HD acyclovir was also assessed. Infants who were </=28 days old and whose disease was considered to be caused by HSV were enrolled in this study. Patients with central nervous system (CNS; N = 28) or disseminated (N = 41) HSV infection were offered participation in the trial. A small number of patients with HSV disease limited to the skin, eyes, or mouth (SEM; N = 10) or whose disease was clinically consistent with HSV but who did not have virologic confirmation of infection (N = 9) also were enrolled on a compassionate basis. Only patients with virologically confirmed HSV disease were included in efficacy analyses. All enrolled patients were included in safety analyses. The study was an open-label evaluation of intravenous acyclovir at dosages higher than the 30 mg/kg/d standard dosage approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The first 16 patients enrolled received intermediate-dose (ID) acyclovir (45 mg/kg/d), and the next 72 patients received HD acyclovir (60 mg/kg/d). Acyclovir was administered in 3 divided daily doses for 21 days. Neonates were assessed prospectively throughout treatment and at scheduled follow-up visits for the first 4 years of life. Data were compared with those of a previous National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group trial in which patients received standard-dose (SD) acyclovir for 10 days and in which identical methods (with the exception of acyclovir dosage and duration of therapy) were used. Six (21%) of 29 HD acyclovir recipients whose HSV disease remained localized to the SEM or CNS experienced neutropenia. One of the 6 had an absolute neutrophil count <500/mm(3), and 5 patients had an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) between 500/mm(3) and 1000/mm(3). In all 6 cases, the ANC recovered during continuation of acyclovir at the same dosage or after completion of acyclovir therapy, and there were no apparent adverse sequelae of the transient neutropenia. No other drug-related adverse events were reported among ID or HD recipients, and no other laboratory aberrations could be correlated specifically with antiviral therapy. The survival rate for the patients with disseminated HSV disease treated with HD acyclovir was significantly higher than for those in the previous study treated with SD acyclovir, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-7.9). For patients with CNS disease, however, survival rates were similar for the HD and SD groups. To assess the effect of HD acyclovir on survival for the entire population with neonatal HSV disease, the Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed with stratification for disease category (CNS versus disseminated). In performing this analysis, differences in mortality for each disease category were weighted to allow statistical comparison of the treatment dosage groups (HD, ID, and SD). This analysis indicated that the survival rate for patients treated with HD acyclovir was statistically significantly higher than for patients treated with SD acyclovir (OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.5-7.3). Recipients of HD acyclovir had a borderline significant decrease in morbidity compared with SD recipients, after stratification for the extent of disease (SEM vs CNS vs disseminated) and controlling for the potential confounding factors of HSV type (HSV-1 vs. HSV-2), prematurity, and disease severity (seizures). Patients treated with HD acyclovir were 6.6 times (adjusted OR; 95% CI: 0.8-113.6) as likely to be developmentally normal at 12 months of age as patients treated with SD therapy. These data support the use of a 21-day course of HD (60 mg/kg/d) intravenous acyclovir to treat neonatal CNS and disseminated HSV disease. Throughout the course of HD acyclovir therapy, serial ANC determination should be made at least twice weekly. Decreasing the acyclovir dosage or administering granulocyte colony-stimulating factor should be considered if the ANC remains below 500/mm(3) for a prolonged period.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2001 · PEDIATRICS
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    ABSTRACT: During the 2 decades in which effective antiviral therapies have been available for neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) disease, changes have been documented not only in the outcomes of infected infants, but also in the natural history of the disease itself. Numerous studies previously have reported that early institution of antiviral therapy is beneficial to the outcome of the disease. The objective of this study was to provide an update of neonatal HSV disease to identify means by which future improvements in the management of HSV-infected neonates can be made. Neonates enrolled in 2 studies of parenteral acyclovir for the treatment of neonatal HSV disease provided the data source. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group conducted the studies between 1981 and 1997. A total of 186 patients are summarized, all of whom were treated with acyclovir. Demographic and clinical characteristics of these patients are reported. Comparisons between patients treated in the periods between 1981-1988 and 1989-1997 according to extent of disease revealed that the mean time between the onset of disease symptoms and initiation of therapy has not changed significantly from the early 1980s to the late 1990s. Of all patients evaluated, 40% had fetal scalp monitors during the delivery process. A significant minority of patients did not have skin vesicles at the time of their presentation and did not develop them during the acute HSV disease (39% of patients with disseminated disease; 32% of patients with central nervous system [CNS] disease; and 17% of patients with skin, eye, and/or mouth disease). Among patients with CNS disease, mortality was associated with prematurity. Among patients with disseminated HSV disease treated with acyclovir at 30 mg/kg/d, mortality was associated with aspartate transaminase elevations of >/=10 times the upper limit of normal at the time of initiation of acyclovir therapy. Mortality was also associated with lethargy at initiation of antiviral therapy for patients with disseminated disease. Patients' morbidity status was associated with the extent of disease (skin, eye, and/or mouth disease vs CNS vs disseminated). For those patients with CNS disease, morbidity was also associated with seizures at initiation of antiviral therapy. Data presented in the current comparison of neonatal HSV disease over the 2 periods (1981-1988 vs 1989-1997) demonstrate that no progress has been made in decreasing the interval between onset of HSV symptoms and initiation of antiviral therapy. Additional strides in the improvement of disease outcome may occur only if the interval between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy is shortened. The means by which this will be accomplished lie in increased consideration of neonatal HSV infections in acutely ill infants. Specific data and recommendations to facilitate this goal are contained within.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2001 · PEDIATRICS
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    ABSTRACT: G207 is a multimutated, conditionally replicating herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) that is currently in clinical trial for patients with malignant glioma. G207 exhibits an efficient oncolytic activity in tumor cells, yet minimal toxicity in normal tissue when injected into the brains of HSV-susceptible mice or nonhuman primates. In this study, we evaluated the shedding and biodistribution of clinical-grade G207 after intracerebral inoculation (3 107 pfu) in four New World owl monkeys (Aotus nancymae). Using PCR analyses and viral cultures, neither infectious virus nor viral DNA was detected from tear, saliva, or vaginal secretion samples at any time point up to 1 month postinoculation. Analyses of tissues obtained at necropsy at 1 month from two of the four monkeys, plus one monkey inoculated with laboratory-grade G207 (109 pfu) 2 years earlier, showed the distribution of G207 DNA restricted to the brain, although infectious virus was not isolated. Histopathology revealed normal brain tissues including the sites of inoculation. A measurable increase of serum anti-HSV antibody titer was observed in all monkeys, as early as 21 days postinoculation. The results ascertain the safety of G207 in the brain and indicate that strict biohazard management may not be required for G207-treated patients.Keywords: herpes simplex virus, viral therapy, gene therapy, brain, nonhuman primates, toxicity, shedding, safety study
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2000 · Molecular Therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Four classes of antiviral compounds were evaluated for inhibitory activity against two variants of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6A and -6B) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7). These included: (1) a pyrophosphate analog, phosphonoformic acid (PFA); (2) beta-guanine analogs, 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acyclovir or ACV), 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (ganciclovir or GCV) and 9-(4-hydroxy-3-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethylbutylyl)guanine (penciclovir or PCV); (3) acyclic nucleoside phosphonates, (S)-1-[(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxy)propyl]cytosine [cidofovir or (S)-HPMPC] and its cyclic derivative (S)-cyclic-HPMPC (cHPMPC), 9-[[2-hydroxy-1-phosphonomethoxy)ethoxy]methyl]guanine (HPMEMG) and 9-[(2-phosphonylmethoxy)ethyl]-2,6-diaminopurine (PMEDAP), and the seven other related compounds; and (4) a series of benzimidazole ribonucleosides, including 2-bromo-5,6-dichloro-1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)benzimidazole (BDCRB). End-point inhibitory concentration (EPC) and 50% effective inhibitory concentration (EC50) values were determined by a dot-blot antigen detection method in cord blood mononuclear cells infected with HHV-6A, HHV-6B or HHV-7 at a multiplicity of infection of 0.004 CCID50/cell. (S)-HPMPC and cHPMPC had an EC50 value of approximately 0.3 microg/ml for HHV-6A, 1.2 microg/ml for HHV-6B and 3.0 microg/ml for HHV-7. These compounds were the most active of those tested against each virus. The EC50 value of GCV for HHV-6A was 0.65 microg/ml, 1.33 microg/ml for HHV-6B, and >7 microg/ml for HHV-7. The EC50 values of ACV and PCV were approximately 6-8 microg/ml for HHV-6A, 16-24 microg/ml for HHV-6B and 121-128 microg/ml for HHV-7. These drugs were the least active. The sensitivity of HHV-7 to the guanine analogs was different from HHV-6, suggesting a difference in selectivity of specific viral enzymes.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1999 · Antiviral Research
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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to obtain preliminary pharmacokinetic data for acyclovir from gravid women receiving herpes simplex virus suppressive therapy with the acyclovir prodrug valacyclovir. In a prospective, double-blind trial, 20 women with a history of recurrent genital herpes simplex virus infection and positive herpes simplex virus 2 serologic results were randomly assigned at 36 weeks' gestation to receive oral valacyclovir (500 mg twice daily) or acyclovir (400 mg 3 times daily). Acyclovir pharmacokinetic profiles were obtained after the initial dose (36 weeks) and at steady state (38 weeks). Amniotic fluid samples were obtained during labor and simultaneous umbilical cord and maternal plasma samples were collected at delivery. Laboratory studies were performed to screen for laboratory evidence of toxicity in mothers and infants. Peak acyclovir plasma concentrations (mean +/- standard deviation) were higher in valacyclovir recipients than in acyclovir recipients after the initial dose (3.14 +/- 0.7 microg/mL vs 0.74 +/- 0.6 microg/mL, P < .0001) and at steady state (3.03 +/- 1.0 microg/mL vs 0.94 +/- 0.7 microg/mL, P < .001). The daily area under the curve values were higher in valacyclovir recipients than acyclovir recipients after the initial dose (17.8 +/- 3.6 h x microg/mL vs 7.71 +/- 2.5 h x microg/mL, P < .001) and at steady state (19.65 +/- 6.4 h x microg/mL versus 11.0 +/- 4.5 h x microg/mL, P = .009). There was no significant difference in drug elimination half-life or in time to peak concentration between valacyclovir and acyclovir recipients at either sampling interval. Acyclovir was concentrated in the amniotic fluid; however, there was no evidence of preferential fetal drug accumulation (mean maternal/umbilical vein plasma ratios at delivery were 1.7 for valacyclovir and 1.3 for acyclovir). Valacyclovir was well tolerated, and no significant laboratory or clinical evidence of toxicity was detected. In this phase I trial maternal valacyclovir therapy resulted in higher plasma acyclovir levels, with significantly higher peak concentrations and daily area under the curve values, than did acyclovir therapy. Additional trials are needed to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of suppressive valacyclovir therapy during late pregnancy.
    No preview · Article · Oct 1998 · American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Institutions

  • 1987-2013
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Division of Infectious Diseases
      Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Alabama
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Tuscaloosa, AL, United States