Osman Mermi

Firat University, Mezreh, Elazığ, Turkey

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Publications (26)34.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: The effect of a variety of treatment modalities including psychopharmacological and cognitive behavioral therapy on the brain volumes and neurochemicals have not been investigated enough in the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on the volumes of the orbito-frontal cortex and thalamus regions which seem to be abnormal in the patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. We hypothesized that there would be change in the volumes of the orbito-frontal cortex and thalamus. Methods: Twelve patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and same number of healthy controls were included into the study. At the beginning of the study, the volumes of the orbito-frontal cortex and thalamus were compared by using magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, volumes of these regions were measured before and after the cognitive behavioral therapy treatment in the patient group. Results: The patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder had greater left and right thalamus volumes and smaller left and right orbito-frontal cortex volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects at the beginning of the study. When we compared baseline volumes of the patients with posttreatment ones, we detected that thalamus volumes significantly decreased throughout the period for both sides and that the orbito-frontal cortex volumes significantly increased throughout the period for only left side. Conclusions: In summary, we found that cognitive behavioral therapy might volumetrically affect the key brain regions involved in the neuroanatomy of obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, future studies with larger sample are required.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine
  • osman mermi · Murad Atmaca
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    ABSTRACT: Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with antidepressant and anxiolytic characteristics. In association with paroxetine cessation, certain side effects can be observed frequently, including dizziness, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, insomnia, and irritability. Paroxetine-induced peripheral edema has been reported. However, there has been no report on peripheral edema related to paroxetine cessation. Here, we report a case who developed peripheral edema related to paroxetine discontinuation and whose peripheral edema disappeared after resumption of the paroxetine treatment. © 2015, Cukurova Univ Tip Fakultesi Psikiyatri Anabilim Dali. All Rights Reserved.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Bulletin of Clinical Psychopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we focused on the key brain regions, OFC and thalamus, to investigate the roles of antiobsessional agents on volume changes of these brain regions after 12 weeks of anti-obsessional treatment in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fourteen patients with OCD and the same number of healthy controls were included in the study. At baseline, the volumes of the OFC and thalamus were compared by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between groups. The volumes of OFC and thalamus were evaluated before and after the anti-obsessional drug treatment solely in the patient group. Our study revealed that thalamus volumes were reduced statistically significantly throughout the treatment period. However, we found that OFC volumes did not change statistically significantly throughout the treatment period. In summary, our study found that anti-obsessional drug treatment had an effect on thalamus volumes throughout the treatment period for both sides but not on OFC volumes. However, future studies with larger sample are required.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Brain Imaging and Behavior
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    ABSTRACT: Although it has important relationships with psychiatric symptoms via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, there have been limited investigations of pituitary neuroimaging in psychiatric disorder. Moreover, there have been no studies of borderline personality disorder. In the present investigation, we examined pituitary gland volumes in patients with borderline personality disorder. Seventeen right-handed female patients with borderline personality disorder, selected among the patients who had presented to Firat University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry outpatient and inpatient clinics, and the same number of healthy control subjects were included in the present investigation. Pituitary gland volumes were manually detected. The results demonstrated that the mean volumes of the gland of the patients with borderline personality disorder were not significantly different than those of healthy control subjects (mean volume of 0.79 cm(3) in the patient group, with a value of SD ± 0.11 and 0.81 cm(3) in the healthy control group, with a value of SD ± 0.23; t = -0.21; p > 0.05). © The Author(s) 2015.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Our study group previously measured pituitary volumes and found a relationship between somatoform disoders and pituitary volumes. Therefore, in conversion disorder, another somatoform disorder, we hypothesized that pituitary gland volumes would be reduced. Twenty female patients and healthy controls were recruited to the present investigation. The volumes of the pituitary gland were determined by using a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. We found that the pituitary gland volumes of the patients with conversion disorder were significantly smaller than those of healthy control subjects. In the patients with conversion disorder but not in the healthy control group, a significant negative correlation between the duration of illness and pituitary gland volume was determined. In summary, in the present study, we suggest that the patients with conversion disorder have smaller pituitary volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects. Further studies should confirm our data and ascertain whether volumetric alterations determined in the patients with conversion disorder can be changed with treatment or if they change over time.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Brain Imaging and Behavior
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of caffeine use and the one-month prevalence of caffeine intoxication among psychiatric patients in comparison with healthy controls. Methods: Four hundred and one patients with various psychiatric disorders and 150 healthy controls were screened for current (one month) caffeine intoxication according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. All parti-cipants were asked to complete Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The patients were also assessed with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) to determine symptom severity. Results: The amount of daily caffeine con-sumption was statistically significantly higher in healthy control subjects than in patients. However, the prevalence of caffeine intoxication was greater among patients with a psychiatric disorder (8%) when compared with healthy controls (2.7%). In the patients, the amount of caffeine consumption correlated positively with age, CGI, and PSQI scores, indicating that patients with older age, poorer sleep quality, and more severe pathology consumed higher amounts of caffeine. Conclusions: Caffeine intoxication was more prevalent in psychiatric patients than in healthy subjects. The amount of caffeine intake was shown to be associated positively with the severity of pathology and inversely with sleep quality. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of regulating caffeine consumption on severity of pathology and sleep quality among psychiatric patients. © 2016, Cukurova University, Faculty of Medicine. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Anadolu Psikiyatri Dergisi
  • Osman Mermi · Murad Atmaca

    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Anadolu Psikiyatri Dergisi
  • Osman Mermi · Murad Atmaca

    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Turk psikiyatri dergisi = Turkish journal of psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: Drug-induced alopecia is a side effect characterized by generalized hair loss. It is reversible when the drug is discontinued. Among psychotropic agents, this side-effect is most often reported with the use of valproic acid and lithium. There are limited reports on atypical antipsychotic-induced hair loss. Here, we report a case of hair loss after olanzapine use which resolved after the discontinuation of olanzapine.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the dominant affective temperament and the impulsivity of bipolar disorder (BD) patients with and without comorbid obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in comparison with healthy controls. Method: The study was conducted among outpatients of the psychiatry clinic of Fırat University Hospital. Thirty patients with the diagnosis of BD with comorbid OCD, 40 patients with the diagnosis of BD without OCD, and 40 healthy controls similar to the study groups in terms of age and gender. The patients and controls were asked to complete a socio-demographic data sheet, Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, San Diego Autoquestionaire (TEMPS-A), and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11). Patients were also evaluated by Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Results: In both study groups frequencies of dominant depressive, cyclothymic, irritable, and anxious temperament and their scores were significantly higher than those of controls. There was no difference between BD patients with and without OCD comorbidity in respect to their dominant temperaments. The patients scored significantly higher on the BIS-11 total and sub-dimensions than the controls. The scores of attention related with impulsiveness in BD patients with comorbid OCD were significantly higher. Conclusion: In our study we found that BD patients with or without comorbid OCD exhibited differences in some subscores of temperament characteristics and impulsivity when compared with healthy controls.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Accession Number: 98381531; Kılıç, Faruk 1; Email Address: drfarukk33@hotmail.com Murat Kuloğlu, M. 2 Gürkan Gürok, M. 3 Mermi, Osman 4 Atmaca, Murad 5; Affiliation: 1: Uzm. Dr., Muş Devlet Hastanesi, Psikiyatri Kliniği, Muş-Türkiye 2: Prof. Dr., Akdeniz üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi Psikiyatri Kliniği, Antalya-Türkiye 3: Uzm. Dr., Elazığ Ruh Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Hastanesi, Elazığ-Türkiye 4: Yrd. Doç. Dr., Fırat üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Psikiyatri Kliniği, Elazığ-Türkiye 5: Prof. Dr., Fırat üniversitesi, Tıp Fakültesi, Psikiyatri Kliniği, Elazığ-Türkiye; Source Info: 2014, Vol. 4 Issue 3, p103; Subject Term: PSYCHOTHERAPY patients; Subject Term: RESEARCH; Subject Term: IMPULSIVE personality; Subject Term: TEMPERAMENT; Subject Term: OBSESSIVE-compulsive disorder -- Diagnosis; Subject Term: BIPOLAR disorder -- Diagnosis; Author-Supplied Keyword: bipolar disorder; Author-Supplied Keyword: impulsivity; Author-Supplied Keyword: obsessive compulsive disord
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: There is an increase in the use of herbal therapies in recent years. St. John's Wort (SJW), which is also named as Hypericum perforatum, is one of the most frequently used herbal agents in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. SJW has been shown to be efficacious in treating mild to moderate depression, insomnia, and anxiety disorders. Although exact mechanism of action is not completely understood, its active components are suggested to have antidepressant properties. Despite its beneficial therapeutic effects, SJW can also cause unexpected adverse effects. Herein, we present the case of a 47-year-old, previously healthy female who developed psychosis after taking SJW extract and successfully treated with antipsychotic therapy.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Accession Number: 95402044; Gurok, Mehmet Gurkan 1 Mermi, Osman 2 Kilic, Faruk 2 Canan, Fatih 3; Email Address: faithcanan@gmail.com Kuloglu, Murat 3; Affiliation: 1: Elazığ Mental Health Hospital, Elazığ-Turkey 2: Fırat University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Elazığ-Turkey 3: Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Antalya-Turkey; Source Info: 2014, Vol. 4 Issue 1, p38; Subject Term: HYPERICUM perforatum; Subject Term: MENTAL illness -- Treatment; Subject Term: ANTIDEPRESSANTS; Subject Term: ANTIPSYCHOTIC drugs; Author-Supplied Keyword: herbal therapy; Author-Supplied Keyword: psychosis; Author-Supplied Keyword: St. John's wort; Author-Supplied Keyword: bitkisel tedavi; Author-Supplied Keyword: psikotik atak; Author-Supplied Keyword: sarı kantaron; Language of Keywords: English; Language of Keywords: Turkish; NAICS/Industry Codes: 325410 Pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing; NAICS/Industry Codes: 325411 Medicinal and Botanical Manufacturing; Nu
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014
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    Murad Atmaca · Osman Mermi
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    ABSTRACT: A 67-year-old male suffering from depressive symptomatology was admitted to the inpatient clinic at Firat University School of Medicine; and his psychiatric evaluation revealed major depressive episode according to DSM-IV. He developed chest discomfort, chest pain and shortness of breath of acute onset accompanying pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) leading to cardiac arrest following sertraline and mirtazapine combination treatment. He died after two days in the Intensive Care Unit. The present case suggests that psychiatrists should be aware of unexpected cardiac events, especially when they use combination treatments.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Iranian Journal of Psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: In neuroimaging on borderline personality disorder, prior studies focused on the hippocampus and amygdala, as mentioned above. However, no study investigated whether there were neurochemical changes in the patients with borderline personality disorder. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate neurochemical change of patients diagnosed with borderline disorder and hypothesized that neurochemicals would change in the hippocampus region of these patients. Seventeen patients and the same number of healthy control subjects were analyzed by using a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa Imaging System. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline compounds (CHO), and creatine (CRE) values of hippocampal region were measured. The mean NAA/CRE ratio in the hippocampus region was significantly reduced in the patients with borderline personality disorder compared to that of healthy control subjects, In addition, NAA/CHO ratio of the patients with borderline personality disorder was also significantly reduced when compared to that of healthy subjects. There was no difference in the ratio of CHO/CRE. In summary, we present evidence for reduced NAA in the patients with borderline personality disorder. © 2015, The Author(s).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine
  • Osman Mermi · Omer Ozer · Sema Baykara · Murad Atmaca

    No preview · Article · Jan 2014

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering
  • Murad Atmaca · Osman Mermi

    No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Journal of clinical psychopharmacology
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    Murad Atmaca · Sevda Korkmaz · Mehtap Topuz · Osman Mermi
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively identify sexual dysfunction changes in the patients under mirtazapine-augmented serotonin reuptake inhibito (SSRI) treatment. The study comprised medical records of 20 outpatients, under mirtazapine-augmented SSRI treatment for their major depressive disorder, who had been selected among the patients that had developed sexual dysfunction to previous treatment as monotherapy, with SSRI for at least six weeks. These drugs were maintained and mirtazapine were added (15-45 mg/day). There was a significant difference in scores between baseline and week 4 or week 8 on the both Hamilton Depression Rating and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale. According to Clinical Global Impression-Improvement, 68.4% of the patients were responders. The use of low-dose mirtazapine as an add-on treatment to SSRIs appears to be an effective and well-tolerated augmenttaion for sexual dysfunction caused by SSRIs.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Psychiatry investigation
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    ABSTRACT: Although a number of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and genetic studies have been performed on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), only limited studies in which genetic and neuroanatomical variables are evaluated concurrently have been performed. Therefore, the aim of our present study is (to understand) better understanding how genetic variation in the promoter region of the 5-HTT gene (5-HTTLPR) is associated with key brain structures in OCD, orbito-frontal cortex (OFC), thalamus and anterior cingulate. 5-HTT genotypes (SS, SL, LL) were determined for 40 patients with OCD and the same number of healthy controls. MRI-derived volumes of the OFC, thalamus, and anterior cingulate were determined by reliable tracing techniques. Volumetric measurements were made with T1-weighted coronal MRI images, with 1.5-mm-thick slices, at 1.5T, and were done blindly. In comparison with controls, OCD patients demonstrated volumes reduction in OFC, increased volumes of thalamus and total white matter volumes, but no difference in total brain volume, total gray matter volumes and anterior cingulate volumes. No significant difference was observed in allelic frequencies between the patients and controls. The stronger effects of 5-HTT polymorphism on brain morphology in OCD than those in controls were determined in the both OFC and thalamus. On the other hand, for the OCD patients, ANCOVA revealed a significant main effect of genotype for both the OFC and thalamus and a significant genotype-by-side interaction for the OFC, demonstrating that the short variants had a smaller right OFC than the long variants. In conclusion, we found a significant genotype-diagnosis interaction effects on key brain structures, with a stronger effects of 5-HTT polymorphism in OFC and thalamus of OCD patients, whereas no morphological changes related to the polymorphism were found in normal individuals.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2011 · Journal of anxiety disorders