Richard W Casey

University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (9)11.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Many men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) forego therapy because they are dissatisfied with current treatment options. While surgical resection and ablation using many different forms of energy remain the reference standard for BPH treatment, many men seek a less invasive technique that will improve symptoms but not risk the complications associated with tissue removal. The Prostatic Urethral Lift opens the prostatic urethra with UroLift (NeoTract Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) permanent implants that are delivered under cystoscopic visualization. The implants literally "hold open" the lateral prostatic lobes creating a passage through the obstructed prostatic urethra. Voiding and symptoms are significantly improved without the morbidity or possible complications following prostate resection. The entire procedure can be readily performed using local anesthesia. As with all new implant procedures, the technique has evolved with experience. The objective of this article is to describe the most current technique for the delivery of the UroLift implant in order to achieve maximal impact on symptom relief.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
  • Richard W Casey · Jack Barkin

    No preview · Article · Feb 2011 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
  • Richard W Casey · Jack Barkin

    No preview · Article · Jan 2009 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
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    Richard W Casey · Jack Barkin
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    ABSTRACT: Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can have significant beneficial effects in the appropriate hypogonadal male patient. Testosterone deficiency is common in primary care practice and recognition of the signs and symptoms of this abnormality will allow physicians to choose appropriate interventions. The symptoms of clinical hypogonadism include muscle weakness, fatigue, mood changes and a reduced libido. Signs include a reduced muscle mass, osteoporosis, anemia and increased adiposity. While routine screening for testosterone deficiency, determination of testosterone levels in high risk populations, including obesity and diabetes, will help the clinician direct TRT to the patients most likely to benefit from therapy. In this article the syndrome of male hypogonadism is discussed, together with therapeutic choices available to the primary care physician.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2008 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
  • Richard W Casey · Jack Barkin

    No preview · Article · Jun 2008 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
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    ABSTRACT: To perform a Canadian multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 6 weeks of levofloxacin therapy compared with placebo in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Uncontrolled studies have supported the use of antibiotics in CP/CPPS. Men with a National Institutes of Health (NIH) diagnosis of CP/CPPS (specifically, no infection localized to the prostate) were randomized to levofloxacin (500 mg/day) or placebo for 6 weeks in 11 Canadian centers. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 weeks with the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and global patient assessments (subjective global assessment and patient assessment questionnaire). Eighty men (average age 56.0 years, range 36 to 78; duration of symptoms 6.5 years, range 0.6 to 32) were randomized to receive levofloxacin (n = 45) or placebo (n = 35). All were evaluated in an intent-to-treat analysis. Both groups experienced progressive improvement in symptoms as measured by the NIH-CPSI. However, the difference in response was not statistically or clinically significant at end of treatment (6 weeks) or at the end of the follow-up visits (12 weeks). No patients withdrew because of adverse events. One patient withdrew before the 6-week assessment. Adverse events (all mild) were reported in 20% of the levofloxacin group and 17% of the placebo group. This pilot placebo-controlled study showed that 6 weeks of levofloxacin therapy in men diagnosed with CP/CPPS resulted in symptom improvement that was not significantly different from that with placebo at end of treatment or follow-up. The clinical ramifications of these findings need to be addressed.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2003 · Urology
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablates benign prostatic tissue in a minimally invasive manner with low morbidity. The safety and effectiveness of treating of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) with HIFU using 3 different protocols are reported. METHODS: Forty six male patients with a mean age of 65 (range 47-84) were treated using the Sonablate HIFU device (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis IN) with 3 different protocols at 3 centres (LDS n=20, PJP n=12, RWC n=14). Baseline and outcome measures included AUA symptom score, peak urinary flow rate (Qmax) and quality of life (QOL) score. Early and long term complications were recorded. RESULTS: At 12 months post-HIFU, patients showed improvements in AUA symptom scores of 35% (LDS), 43% (PJP) and 59% (RWC). Qmax improved by 30% (LDS), 37% (PJP) and 63% (RWC). QOL scores improved by 63% (LDS) and 58% (RWC). Minor complications included hematospermia (13%), mild to moderate hematuria (9%), acute retention (4%), perineal pain (11%) and epididymitis (9%). Recatheterization occurred in up to 16% of patients. Eleven patients in the LDS and PJP series required a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for symptoms of urinary obstruction after HIFU treatment. There were no TURP's following HIFU in the RWC series. CONCLUSIONS: HIFU is safe, produces acceptable complications and effectively relieves BPH symptoms.
    No preview · Article · Jul 1999 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To determine the minimum clinically important difference with respect to the different outcome measures used in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) research. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients diagnosed with symptomatic BPH were prospectively recruited from community urology clinics. Patients were asked at follow-up visits to rate their improvement using a self-administrated questionnaire. The improvement score was then compared to the changes from baseline in each of the outcome measures. RESULTS: Maximum and mean flow-rates did not correlate significantly with the patient's improvement measure. The Boyarsky score correlated best with the patient's grading of overall improvement (R=.507, p<.001). The mean change in Boyarsky symptom score for patients with a small improvement was 3.23 (sd=3.52).
    No preview · Article · Feb 1997 · The Canadian Journal of Urology
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor blocker terazosin in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods. Two hundred twenty-four patients aged 50 to 80 years, who had a diagnosis of BPH based on medical history, physical examination, and digital palpation, were recruited from 11 different sites between January 1992 and January 1994. The study consisted of a screening phase, a placebo phase, a double-blind dose-titration phase, and a double-blind maintenance phase. Results. Of the patients recruited, 164 entered the double-blind phase and of these 134 were evaluable. Only 11 patients withdrew because of an adverse event, 7 in the terazosin and 4 in the placebo group. Compared to placebo, terazosin significantly increased peak and mean urine flow rates without significantly affecting voided volume or postvoid residual volume. It significantly improved both the obstructive and irritative symptoms associated with BPH. Fifty-one patients from the terazosin group reported a total of 120 adverse events compared with 83 reported by 42 patients in the placebo group. The majority of these events were mild to moderate. Seventeen terazosin-treated patients reported hypotension-related adverse events and 4 withdrew from the study. However, concurrent treatment with antihypertensive agents did not affect the blood pressure response of the terazosin group. Conclusions. Overall, this study showed terazosin to be safe and effective in relieving the signs and symptoms of BPH and should be considered as a treatment alternative.
    No preview · Article · Mar 1996 · Urology