Angel Segura

Hospital Universitari i Politècnic la Fe, Valenza, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (46)132.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to identify the profile of immunohistochemical (IHC) parameters, copy number aberrations (CNAs) and epigenetic alterations [promoter methylation (PM) and miR expression] related to hereditary (H) and triple negative (TN) breast cancer (BC). This profile could be of relevance for guiding tumor response to treatment with targeting therapy. The study comprises 278 formalin fixed paraffin-embedded BCs divided into two groups: H group, including 88 hereditary BC (HBC) and 190 non hereditary (NHBC), and TN group, containing 79 TNBC and 187 non TNBC (NTNBC). We assessed IHC parameters (Ki67, ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK18 and Cadherin-E), CNA of 20 BC related genes, and PM of 24 tumor suppressor genes employing MLPA/MS-MLPA (MRC Holland, Amsterdam). MiR-4417, miR-423-3p, miR-590-5p and miR-187-3p expression was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR (Applied Biosystems). Binary logistic regression was applied to select the parameters that better differentiate the HBC or TN groups. For HBC we found that, ER expression, ERBB2 CNA and PM in RASSF1 and TIMP3 were associated with NHBC whereas; MYC and AURKA CNA were linked to HBC. For TNBC, we found that CDC6 CNA, GSTP1 and RASSF1 PM and miR-423-3p hyperexpression were characteristic of NTNBC, while MYC aberrations, BRCA1 hypermethylation and miR-590-5p and miR-4417 hyperexpression were more indicative of TNBC. The selected markers allow establishing BC subtypes, which are characterized by showing similar etiopathogenetic mechanisms, some of them being molecular targets for known drugs or possible molecular targets. These results could be the basis to implement a personalized therapy.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American Journal of Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Based on the mechanism of action, combining somatostatin analogues (SSAs) with mTOR inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents may provide synergistic effects for the treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Herein, we investigate the use of these treatment combinations in clinical practice. This retrospective cross-sectional analysis of patients with NETs treated with the SSA lanreotide and targeted therapies at 35 Spanish hospitals evaluated the efficacy and safety of lanreotide treatment combinations in clinical practice. The data of 159 treatment combinations with lanreotide in 133 patients was retrospectively collected. Of the 133 patients, with a median age of 59.4 (16-83) years, 70 (52.6 %) patients were male, 64 (48.1 %) had pancreatic NET, 23 (17.3 %) had ECOG PS ≥2, 41 (30.8 %) had functioning tumours, 63 (47.7 %) underwent surgery of the primary tumour, 45 (33.8 %) had received prior chemotherapy, and 115 (86.5 %) had received prior SSAs. 115 patients received 1 lanreotide treatment combination and 18 patients received between 2 and 5 combinations. Lanreotide was mainly administered in combination with everolimus (73 combinations) or sunitinib (61 combinations). The probability of being progression-free was 78.5 % (6 months), 68.6 % (12 months) and 57.0 % (18 months) for patients who only received everolimus plus lanreotide (n = 57) and 89.3 % (6 months), 73.0 % (12 months), and 67.4 % (18 months) for patients who only received sunitinib and lanreotide (n = 50). In patients who only received everolimus plus lanreotide the median time-to-progression from the initiation of lanreotide combination treatment was 25.8 months (95 % CI, 11.3, 40.3) and it had not yet been reached among the subgroup of patients only receiving sunitinib plus lanreotide. The safety profile of the combination treatment was comparable to that of the targeted agent alone. The combination of lanreotide and targeted therapies, mainly everolimus and sunitinib, is widely used in clinical practice without unexpected toxicities and suggests efficacy that should be explored in randomized prospective clinical trials.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · BMC Cancer
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    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Annals of Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease that represents <1 % of all breast cancers (BCs). We analyze the results of a multicenter study performed in Spanish familial MBC including family history of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOCS) and clinicopathological features. We also study the relationship between BRCA1/BRCA2 mutational status in male relatives affected with cancer (MAC) and, family history and tumor types. The study included 312 men index cases with family history of HBOCS and 61 MAC BRCA1/2 mutation-carriers. Family history, histological grade (HG), clinicopathological and immunohistochemistry data were collected. BRCA1/2 mutation analyses were performed by direct sequencing or screening methods and the large rearrangements by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification. We found 49 mutation-carriers (15.7 %), 95.9 % with BRCA2 mutations. BRCA2 mutation-carriers were associated with families with at least one MBC and one BC in female (type II; p = 0.05). Strong association were found between the presence of pathogenic mutations in MBCs and the advanced HG (p = 0.003). c.658_659delTG, c.2808_2811delACAA, c.6275_6276delTT and c.9026_9030delATCAT were the most prevalent mutations. In 61 MAC we found 20 mutations in BRCA1 and 41 in BRCA2. For MAC we show that mutational status was differentially associated with family history (p = 0.018) and tumor type, being BRCA2 mutations linked with BC and prostatic cancer (p = 0.018). MBC caused by BRCA1/2 mutations define two types of MBCs. The most frequent caused by BRCA2 mutation linked to type II families and the rarest one attributed to BRCA1 mutation. Tumor associated with MAC suggest that only BRCA2 mutations have to do with a specific type of cancer (BC and prostatic cancer); but the linkage to tumors is questionable for BRCA1 mutations .
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Familial Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected gastric cancer. However, difficulties in standardizing an optimal surgical approach and a perceived higher toxicity compared with the perioperative approach have limited its widespread application in Europe. The aim of our study was to assess toxicity and long-term outcomes of adjuvant CRT at our institution. A retrospective review (September 2001-January 2012) was completed of patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant CRT (Macdonald regimen). Adverse events and completion rates, RFS and OS were estimated. Univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic factors for OS were performed. Eighty-seven patients were included. Most had diffuse (52%) and locally advanced tumors (stage III-IV; 66.7%). D2 lymphadenectomy was performed in 80.5%. The most frequent grade 3-4 toxicities were gastrointestinal (28%) and stomatitis (20%), with 78.2% completing treatment. With a median follow-up of 115 months, 58.5% had relapsed, most of them distantly. Median RFS and OS were 9 and 24 months, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that performance status, stage and lymph node burden were significant factors for OS. In the multivariate study, only stage and lymph node burden remained as independent OS predictors. Our implementation of the Macdonald regimen achieved worse outcomes than those reported in the INT-0116 trial. The rate of distant relapse remains unacceptably high. Higher rate of positive lymph nodes and of diffuse tumors could explain some differences. The use of perioperative chemotherapy, especially in patients with a poorer prognosis, might improve these results.
    No preview · Article · May 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Advances in the care of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer arise from well-designed clinical trials. In the present document we address specific challenges in the design of clinical trials for metastatic colorectal cancer regarding staging and standard of care according to prognosis, as well as some relevant methodological issues
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates the relationship of promoter methylation in tumor suppressor genes with copy-number aberrations (CNA) and with tumor markers in breast cancer (BCs). The study includes 98 formalin fixed paraffin-embedded BCs in which promoter methylation of 24 tumour suppressor genes were assessed by Methylation-Specific Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MS-MLPA), CNA of 20 BC related genes by MLPA and ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK18, EGFR, Cadherin-E, P53, Ki-67 and PARP expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cluster analysis classed BCs in two groups according to promoter methylation percentage: the highly-methylated group (16 BCs), containing mostly hyper-methylated genes, and the sparsely-methylated group (82 BCs) with hypo-methylated genes. ATM, CDKN2A, VHL, CHFR and CDKN2B showed the greatest differences in the mean methylation percentage between these groups. We found no relationship of the IHC parameters or pathological features with methylation status, except for Catherin-E (p = 0.008). However the highly methylated BCs showed higher CNA proportion than the sparsely methylated BCs (p < 0.001, OR = 1.62; IC 95% [1.26, 2.07]). CDC6, MAPT, MED1, PRMD14 and AURKA showed the major differences in the CNA percentage between the two groups, exceeding the 22%. Methylation in RASSF1, CASP8, DAPK1 and GSTP1 conferred the highest probability of harboring CNA. Our results show a new link between promoter methylation and CNA giving support to the importance of methylation events to establish new BCs subtypes. Our findings may be also of relevance in personalized therapy assessment, which could benefit the hyper methylated BC patients group.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · American Journal of Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims: Individuals with tumours showing mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency not linked to germline mutations or somatic methylation of MMR genes have been recently referred as having 'Lynch-like syndrome' (LLS). The genetic basis of these LLS cases is unknown. MUTYH-associated polyposis patients show some phenotypic similarities to Lynch syndrome patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of germline MUTYH mutations in a large series of LLS patients. Methods: Two hundred and twenty-five probands fulfilling LLS criteria were included in this study. Screening of MUTYH recurrent mutations, whole coding sequencing and a large rearrangement analysis were undertaken. Age, sex, clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics of tumours including KRAS mutations were assessed. Results: We found a prevalence of 3.1% of MAP syndrome in the whole series of LLS (7/225) and 3.9% when only cases fulfilling clinical criteria were considered (7/178). Patients with MUTYH biallelic mutations had more adenomas than monoallelic (P=0.02) and wildtype patients (P<0.0001). Six out of nine analysed tumours from six biallelic MUTYH carriers harboured KRAS-p.G12C mutation. This mutation was found to be associated with biallelic MUTYH germline mutation when compared with reported series of unselected colorectal cancer cohorts (P<0.0001). Conclusions: A proportion of unexplained LLS cases is caused by biallelic MUTYH mutations. The obtained results further justify the inclusion of MUTYH in the diagnostic strategy for Lynch syndrome-suspected patients.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990)
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    ABSTRACT: Background Cardiac metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma are very uncommon. Their incidence is rising due to improvements in survival and diagnosis; nevertheless, our patient is the fourth case reported up to date. There are no clinical trials available in this scenario. Therefore, treatment choice is made based on clinical experience and case reports; notably, the largest case report series was prior to the approval for using tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in thyroid cancer. Patient A 73-year-old lady had dedifferentiated papillary thyroid cancer with ongoing sorafenib. After 9 months on this treatment, she presented with dyspnea and heart failure. Differential diagnosis included infection, progression of disease and cardiotoxicity. After a comprehensive assessment (echocardiography, computed tomography, PET, magnetic resonance), we found progression of lung disease, and the appearance of heart metastases. Results After recovering from the basal status, she started on second-line treatment with sunitinib, which was well-tolerated. She achieved stable disease with a decrease in tumor marker levels. Conclusions We should include cardiac metastases in the differential diagnosis of heart failure in cancer patients. Magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard for assessment. Sorafenib is the mainstay of the first-line therapy in metastatic thyroid cancer, achieving long-term disease control with good tolerance. Sunitinib could be a safe second-line treatment option (not cardiotoxicity related) with promising results. Therefore, our report presents a sequence of treatment with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in metastatic thyroid carcinoma with an encouraging outcome, which deserves further investigation.
    Preview · Article · May 2014 · Case Reports in Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Germline mutations in DNA polymerase ε (POLE) and δ (POLD1) have been recently identified in families with multiple colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer (CRC). All reported cases carried POLE c.1270C>G (p.Leu424Val) or POLD1 c.1433G>A (p.Ser478Asn) mutations. Due to the scarcity of cases reported so far, an accurate clinical phenotype has not been defined. We aimed to assess the prevalence of these recurrent mutations in unexplained familial and early-onset CRC and polyposis, and to add additional information to define the clinical characteristics of mutated cases. A total of 858 familial/early onset CRC and polyposis patients were studied: 581 familial and early onset CRC cases without mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, 86 cases with MMR deficiency, and 191 polyposis cases. Mutation screening was performed by KASPar genotyping assays and/or Sanger sequencing of the involved exons. POLE p.L424 V was identified in a 28 year-old polyposis and CRC patient, as a de novo mutation. None of the 858 cases studied carried POLD1 p.S478N. A new mutation, POLD1 c.1421T>C (p.Leu474Pro), was identified in a mismatch repair proficient Amsterdam II family. Its pathogenicity was supported by co-segregation in the family, in silico predictions, and previously published yeast assays. POLE and POLD1 mutations explain a fraction of familial CRC and polyposis. Sequencing the proof-reading domains of POLE and POLD1 should be considered in routine genetic diagnostics. Until additional evidence is gathered, POLE and POLD1 genetic testing should not be restricted to polyposis cases, and the presence of de novo mutations, considered.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · Human Molecular Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: The combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib is a standard first-line treatment for unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We reviewed our single centre experience to assess its efficacy and toxicity in clinical practice. Clinical records of patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer who were treated with the combination of gemcitabine and erlotinib were reviewed. Univariate survival analysis and multivariate analysis were carried out to indentify independent predictors factors of overall survival. Our series included 55 patients. Overall disease control rate was 47%: 5% of patients presented complete response, 20% partial response and 22% stable disease. Median overall survival was 8.3 months). Cox regression analysis indicated that performance status and locally advanced versus metastatic disease were independent factors of overall survival. Patients who developed acne-like rash toxicity, related to erlotinib administration, presented a higher survival than those patients who did not develop this toxicity. Gemcitabine plus erlotinib doublet is active in our series of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. This study provides efficacy and safety results similar to those of the pivotal phase III clinical trial that tested the same combination.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · JOP: Journal of the pancreas
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims Individuals with tumours showing mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency not linked to germline mutations or somatic methylation of MMR genes have been recently referred as having ‘Lynch-like syndrome’ (LLS). The genetic basis of these LLS cases is unknown. MUTYH-associated polyposis patients show some phenotypic similarities to Lynch syndrome patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of germline MUTYH mutations in a large series of LLS patients. Methods Two hundred and twenty-five probands fulfilling LLS criteria were included in this study. Screening of MUTYH recurrent mutations, whole coding sequencing and a large rearrangement analysis were undertaken. Age, sex, clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics of tumours including KRAS mutations were assessed. Results We found a prevalence of 3.1% of MAP syndrome in the whole series of LLS (7/225) and 3.9% when only cases fulfilling clinical criteria were considered (7/178). Patients with MUTYH biallelic mutations had more adenomas than monoallelic (P = 0.02) and wildtype patients (P < 0.0001). Six out of nine analysed tumours from six biallelic MUTYH carriers harboured KRAS-p.G12C mutation. This mutation was found to be associated with biallelic MUTYH germline mutation when compared with reported series of unselected colorectal cancer cohorts (P < 0.0001). Conclusions A proportion of unexplained LLS cases is caused by biallelic MUTYH mutations. The obtained results further justify the inclusion of MUTYH in the diagnostic strategy for Lynch syndrome-suspected patients.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over <=92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · BMC Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Neoadjuvant 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy in resectable rectal cancer (RC) is a standard of treatment. The use of oral fluoropyrimidines and new agents such as oxaliplatin may improve efficacy and tolerance. Between 1999 and 2009, 126 RC patients with T3-T4 and/or N+ disease were given three successive protocols: UFT (32), UFT-oxaliplatin (75) and capecitabine-oxaliplatin (19), alongside 45 Gy of radiotherapy; with surgery 4-6 weeks after. Adjuvant treatment was given in all patients. The primary objective was pathologic complete response (pCR). Preoperative therapy was well tolerated, with no toxic deaths and a 15% grade 3-4 toxicity rate. Eighty-five percent of patients received the full chemotherapy dose, 56% had an abdominoperineal resection, 6% reinterventions and 57% received the full adjuvant chemotherapy planned. The pCR rate was 13%. The downstaging rate was 80%; 8% had progression of disease. The relapse rate was 20%, with local relapse in 6%. By 5 years of followup, 92% of relapses had occurred. Median follow-up was 73 months, 5- and 10-year disease-free survival rates were 75% and 50%, and 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 79% and 66% respectively. There was no benefit from the use of oxaliplatin regarding survival or pCR rates. Older patients had worse long-term outcomes. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidines and oxaliplatin is feasible and well tolerated. The risk of early progression is low. However, there was no added benefit with the use of oxaliplatin. There were no relapses in patients with pCR. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy is unclear.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Although thyroid cancer usually has an excellent prognosis, few therapeutic options are available in the refractory setting. Based on the recent results of phase II studies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, we designed a retrospective analysis of patients with metastatic thyroid cancer treated with sorafenib in seven Spanish referral centers. Consecutive patients with progressive metastatic thyroid cancer (papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic) not suitable for curative surgery, radioactive-iodine therapy, or radiotherapy were treated with sorafenib 400 mg twice a day. The primary end point was objective response rate (RR). Secondary end points included toxicity, median progression-free survival (mPFS), median overall survival (mOS), and correlation between tumor marker levels (thyroglobulin, calcitonin, and carcinoembryonic antigen) and efficacy. Between June 2006 and January 2010, 34 patients were included in the study. Sixteen patients presented differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTC) of which seven (21%) were papillary, nine (26%) follicular, 15 (44%) medullary (MTC), and three (9%) were anaplastic (ATC). Eleven (32%) patients achieved partial response and 14 (41%) had stable disease beyond 6 months. Regarding histological subtype, RRs were 47% (seven of 15) for MTC, 19% (three of 16) for DTC, and 33% (one of three) for ATC. With a median follow-up of 11.5 months, mPFS were 13.5, 10.5, and 4.4 months for DTC, MTC, and ATC respectively. Tumor markers were evaluated in 22 patients, and a statistically significant association was observed between RR and decrease in tumor marker levels >50% (P=0.033). In this retrospective trial, sorafenib showed antitumor efficacy in all histological subtypes of thyroid cancer, warranting further development in this setting.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Endocrine Related Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndrome characterized by early onset cancers of the colorectum, endometrium and other tumours. A significant proportion of DNA variants in LS patients are unclassified. Reports on the pathogenicity of the c.1852_1853AA>GC (p.Lys618Ala) variant of the MLH1 gene are conflicting. In this study, we provide new evidence indicating that this variant has no significant implications for LS. The following approach was used to assess the clinical significance of the p.Lys618Ala variant: frequency in a control population, case-control comparison, co-occurrence of the p.Lys618Ala variant with a pathogenic mutation, co-segregation with the disease and microsatellite instability in tumours from carriers of the variant. We genotyped p.Lys618Ala in 1034 individuals (373 sporadic colorectal cancer [CRC] patients, 250 index subjects from families suspected of having LS [revised Bethesda guidelines] and 411 controls). Three well-characterized LS families that fulfilled the Amsterdam II Criteria and consisted of members with the p.Lys618Ala variant were included to assess co-occurrence and co-segregation. A subset of colorectal tumour DNA samples from 17 patients carrying the p.Lys618Ala variant was screened for microsatellite instability using five mononucleotide markers. Twenty-seven individuals were heterozygous for the p.Lys618Ala variant; nine had sporadic CRC (2.41%), seven were suspected of having hereditary CRC (2.8%) and 11 were controls (2.68%). There were no significant associations in the case-control and case-case studies. The p.Lys618Ala variant was co-existent with pathogenic mutations in two unrelated LS families. In one family, the allele distribution of the pathogenic and unclassified variant was in trans, in the other family the pathogenic variant was detected in the MSH6 gene and only the deleterious variant co-segregated with the disease in both families. Only two positive cases of microsatellite instability (2/17, 11.8%) were detected in tumours from p.Lys618Ala carriers, indicating that this variant does not play a role in functional inactivation of MLH1 in CRC patients. The p.Lys618Ala variant should be considered a neutral variant for LS. These findings have implications for the clinical management of CRC probands and their relatives.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · BMC Medical Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: The standard genetic test for Lynch syndrome (LS) frequently reveals an absence of pathogenic mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes known to be associated with LS. It was recently shown that germ line deletions in the last exons of EPCAM are involved in the etiology of LS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of EPCAM deletions in a Spanish population and the clinical implications of deletion. Probands from 501 families suspected of having LS were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five cases with MSH2 loss were identified: 10 had mutations of MSH2, five had mutations of MSH6, and 10 did not show MSH2/MSH6 mutations. These 25 cases were analyzed for EPCAM deletions using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and deletions were mapped using long-range PCR analysis. One subject with no MSH2/MSH6 mutations had a large deletion in the EPCAM locus that extended for 8.7 kb and included exons 8 and 9. The tumor exhibited MSH2 promoter hypermethylation. EPCAM deletion analysis followed by MSH2 methylation testing of the tumor is a fast low-cost procedure that can be used to identify mutations that cause LS. We propose that this procedure be incorporated into clinical genetic analysis strategies and present a decision-support flow diagram for the diagnosis of LS.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2010 · The Journal of molecular diagnostics: JMD
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    ABSTRACT: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy before surgery is an option in the treatment of locally advanced resectable oesophageal cancer (EC). However toxicity is substantial and the improvement in overall survival (OS) with this approach is controversial. This was a prospective, single-centre study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and concomitant chemoradiotherapy with CDDP and 5-FU and 50.4 Gy of external radiotherapy before possible radical surgery in patients with locally advanced resectable EC. If surgery was not possible, a second-phase radiotherapy boost of 10 Gy and one cycle of modified dose chemotherapy were used. Seventy-three patients included between 1998 and 2007: 96% males, median age 61, 83% squamous cell carcinomas, 23% lower third tumours, 36% stage II and 54% stage III and 47% local lymph node involvement. Eighty-six percent completed the combined protocol. Main grade 3-4 toxicities: mucositis (19%) and infections (8%); 4 toxic deaths. Clinical response rates: complete response 54%, partial response 27%, stable disease 8%. Twenty-five patients proceeded to surgery, with radical resection in 24. Pathological response rate: complete response 32%, partial response 52%, progression 16%. There were 7 postoperative deaths and 16 of 34 patients that did not have surgery received the second-phase RT boost. Survival analysis: Median follow-up of 64 months (range 6-134 months). Median OS of 10.33 months. 2-year and 5-year OS of 22 and 16%. The only significant prognostic factor in OS is the clinical complete response rate: 13.9 vs. 7.7 months (p=0.0049). Our protocol offers a high rate of clinical activity although it is relatively toxic and seems to increase the postoperative mortality, which would blunt any small improvement in survival. The achievement of a complete response is a powerful prognostic factor.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2009 · Clinical and Translational Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Primary meningeal lymphoma is a rare clinical entity. Central nervous system infiltration by systemic lymphoma should always be excluded. Diagnosis can be difficult, and prognosis is usually poor. Most are of B-cell origin. We present the case of a young man with a primary meningeal lymphoma of T-cell origin. He was treated with systemic chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine and intraventricular chemotherapy. He had a clinical improvement and a complete remission, with a long overall survival. There is no standard treatment for this rare disease. Traditionally, treatment has been based in craniospinal radiation therapy and intrathecal chemotherapy, with poor overall results. More recently, systemic chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate has been advocated, which could avoid the long-term toxicity of craniospinal radiation therapy, and could improve the prognosis of these patients.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2007 · Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2007 · EJC Supplements

Publication Stats

463 Citations
132.11 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999-2015
    • Hospital Universitari i Politècnic la Fe
      • • Department of Medical Oncology
      • • Medical Oncology Unit
      • • Servicio de Oncología Médica
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
    • Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2007
    • Università degli Studi di Palermo
      Palermo, Sicily, Italy