Ietje Kathmann

VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

Are you Ietje Kathmann?

Claim your profile

Publications (47)

  • Article · Jul 2016 · Cancer Research
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Transport of erlotinib, gefitinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, dasatinib and crizotinib can be active or passive, which was studied by measuring uptake at low (4 °C; passive) and normal temperature (37 °C; active and passive) and by the use of specific organic cation transporter (OCT) inhibitors. Intracellular accumulation was determined using Caco-2 as monolayers, while for gut permeation we used differentiated Caco-2 as model for intestinal epithelium in the Transwell system. Sorafenib and crizotinib uptake are likely to be dependent on passive transport. Gefitinib, dasatinib and sunitinib uptake seem to be active. Erlotinib’s transport also seems to be active. This study suggests that hOCTs might be involved in the apical to basolateral transport of gefitinib and crizotinib. Overall it can be concluded that the accumulation and transport of these six TKIs are very different, despite the fact that they are all tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
    Full-text Article · Mar 2016
  • Source
    V. V. S. Rajendra Prasad · G. Deepak Reddy · Ietje Kathmann · [...] · G.J. Peters
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A series of nitric oxide donating acridone derivatives are synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activity against different sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines MCF7/Wt, MCF7/Mr (BCRP overexpression) and MCF7/Dx (P-gp expression). The results showed that NO-donating acridones are potent against both the sensitive and resistant cells. Structure activity relationship indicate that the nitric oxide donating moiety connected through a butyl chain at N(10) position as well as morpholino moiety linkage through an amide bridge on the acridone ring system at C-2 position are required to exert a good cytotoxic effect. Further, good correlations were observed when cytotoxic properties were compared with in vitro nitric oxide release rate, nitric oxide donating group potentiated the cytotoxic effect of the acridone derivatives. Exogenous release of nitric oxide by NO donating acridones enhanced the accumulation of doxorubicin in MCF7/Dx cell lines when it was coadministered with doxorubicin, which inhibited the efflux process of doxorubicin. In summary, a nitric oxide donating group can potentiate the anti-MDR property of acridones.
    Full-text Article · Feb 2016 · Bioorganic Chemistry
  • Source
    Deepak Reddy Gade · V.V.S. Rajendra Prasad · Ietje Kathmann · [...] · G.J. Peters
    Full-text Article · Jan 2016 · Bioorganic Chemistry
  • Godefridus J. Peters · Frank H. Van Gemert · I. Kathmann · [...] · Guru Reddy
    Article · Dec 2015 · Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
  • Source
    Jan Hendrik Hooijberg · Gerrit Jansen · Ietje Kathmann · [...] · Godefridus J Peters
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Cellular folate concentration was earlier reported to be a critical factor in the activity and expression of the multidrug resistance protein MRP1 (ABCC1). Since MRP1 mediates resistance to a variety of therapeutic drugs, we investigated whether the cellular folate concentration influences the MRP1-mediated cellular resistance against drugs. As a model system, we used the human ovarian carcinoma cell line 2008wt, and its stably MRP1/ABCC1-transfected subline 2008/MRP1. These cell types have a moderate and high expression of MRP1, respectively. In folate-deprived 2008/MRP1 cells, the MRP1-mediated efflux of its model substrate calcein decreased to ~55 % of the initial efflux rate under folate-rich conditions. In 2008wt cells, only a small decrease in efflux was observed. Folate depletion for 5-10 days markedly increased (~500 %) cellular steady-state accumulation of calcein in 2008/MRP1 cells and moderately in 2008wt cells. A subsequent short (24 h) exposure to 2.3 μM L-leucovorin decreased calcein levels again in MRP1-overexpressing cells. Folate deprivation markedly increased growth inhibitory effects of the established MRP1 substrates daunorubicin (~twofold), doxorubicin (~fivefold), and methotrexate (~83-fold) in MRP1-overexpressing cells, proportional to MRP1 expression. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that increased cellular folate concentrations induce MRP1/ABCC1-related drug efflux and drug resistance. These results have important implications in the understanding of the role of MRP1 and its homologs in clinical drug resistance.
    Full-text Article · Mar 2014 · Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
  • Article · Jan 2014 · Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A novel cytidine analog fluorocyclopentenylcytosine (RX-3117; TV-1360) was characterized for its cytotoxicity in a 59-cell line panel and further characterized for cytotoxicity, metabolism and mechanism of action in 15 additional cancer cell lines, including gemcitabine-resistant variants. In both panels sensitivity varied 75-fold (IC50: 0.4- > 30 μM RX-3117). RX-3117 showed a different sensitivity profile compared to cyclopentenyl-cytosine (CPEC) and azacytidine, substrates for uridine-cytidine-kinase (UCK). Dipyridamole, an inhibitor of the equilibrative-nucleoside-transporter protected against RX-3117. Uridine and cytidine protected against RX-3117, but deoxycytidine (substrate for deoxycytidine-kinase [dCK]) not, although it protected against gemcitabine, demonstrating that RX-3117 is a substrate for UCK and not for dCK. UCK activity was abundant in all cell lines, including the gemcitabine-resistant variants. RX-3117 was a very poor substrate for cytidine deaminase (66,000-fold less than gemcitabine). RX-3117 was rapidly metabolised to its nucleotides predominantly the triphosphate, which was highest in the most sensitive cells (U937, A2780) and lowest in the least sensitive (CCRF-CEM). RX-3117 did not significantly affect cytidine and uridine nucleotide pools. Incorporation of RX-3117 into RNA and DNA was higher in sensitive A2780 and low in insensitive SW1573 cells. In sensitive U937 cells 1 μM RX-3117 resulted in 90 % inhibition of RNA synthesis but 100 μM RX-3117 was required in A2780 and CCRF-CEM cells. RX-3117 at IC50 values did not affect the integrity of RNA. DNA synthesis was completely inhibited in sensitive U937 cells at 1 μM, but in other cells even higher concentrations only resulted in a partial inhibition. At IC50 values RX-3117 downregulated the expression of DNA methyltransferase. In conclusion, RX-3117 showed a completely different sensitivity profile compared to gemcitabine and CPEC, its uptake is transporter dependent and is activated by UCK. RX-3117 is incorporated into RNA and DNA, did not affect RNA integrity, depleted DNA methyltransferase and inhibited RNA and DNA synthesis. Nucleotide formation is related with sensitivity.
    Full-text Article · Sep 2013 · Investigational New Drugs
  • Richard J. Honeywell · Sarina Hitzerd · Ietje Kathmann · [...] · Frits Peters
    Article · Aug 2013 · Cancer Research
  • Godefridus J. Peters · Ietje Kathmann · Clara Lemos · [...] · Gerrit Jansen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Sensitivity to antifolates can be decreased by endogenous or exogenous folates. Leucovorin protects cancer patients against toxicity of the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor methotrexate (MTX), while folic acid is used to protect rheumatoid arthritis patients against MTX. Folates and antifolates can be effluxed from the cell by ABC transporters multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), 2 and 3. We previously demonstrated in 2008 ovarian cancer cells that MRP overexpression reduced cellular folate content by 40%, while folate depletion increased expression of MRP1. As MRPs mediate resistance to several unrelated drugs, we investigated whether folate status would affect sensitivity to doxorubicin, dauno rubicin, etoposide and vincristine. Ovarian cancer 2008 cells and its MRP1 transfected variant (2008/MRP1) were adapted from normal folate medium [2.3 mu M; high folate (HF) cells] to short-term folate depletion (up to 7 days) (low folate cells); drugs were added after 2 days and sensitivity was tested by the MTT test after 3 additional days. The effect on folate homeostasis was evaluated by measurement of intracellular homocysteine using high-performance liquid chromatography and glutathione using a kit. MRP expression of wild-type (WT) 2008 cells did not increase homocysteine pools in 2008/MRP1 cells. Three day folate depletion increased homocysteine pools 23-fold in 2008 cells and 8.6-fold in the MRP variant. Folate depletion increased glutathione 20%-40% in 2008/WT and 2008/MRP1. In 2008 HF cells MRP1 expression did not affect sensitivity to MTX, but induced 4- to 10-fold resistance to doxorubicin, daunorubicin, etoposide and vincristine. Folate depletion decreased 50% growth inhibition (IC50) for MTX in both 2008 variants 25- to 4-fold, but that to doxorubicin and daunorubicin approximately 2-fold. Sensitivity to etoposide and vincristine was not affected. In conclusion, folate depletion markedly increased homocysteine, but moderately increased glutathione. Folate depletion increased MTX sensitivity, but effects on other drugs were most pronounced in WT cells, probably because MRP expression is already high in transfected variants.
    Article · Jun 2013
  • Article · Jun 2012 · Cancer Research
  • V. V. S. Rajendra Prasad · G.J. Peters · Clara Lemos · [...] · Y.C. Mayur
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A series of novel N(10)-substituted acridone derivatives bearing alkyl side-chain with tertiary amine groups at the terminal position were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic effects against drug sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines. All the molecules were designed on the basis of hydrogen bond acceptors, carbonyl, fluoro groups with precise spatial separation and structural features of lipophilicity, positive charge at neutral pH and presence of aromatic rings. The in vitro cytotoxic effects in comparison with reference drugs doxorubicin (DX) and C(1311) against cancer cell lines SW 1573, SW 1573 2R 160 (Pg-P expressing) which are non-small cell lung cancer cells, human embryo kidney cells HEK 293, HEK 293 MRP4, HEK 293 MRP5i, human promyelocytic leukemia sensitive cell line HL-60, including its multidrug cross-resistant of two main (P-gp and MRP) phenotype sublines vincristine resistant HL-60/VINC and doxorubicin resistant HL-60/DX cancer cell lines are presented. Compounds 14, 15 and 16 exhibited highest cytotoxicity among the derivatives. On the other hand, the in vitro cytotoxic activity of compound 14 (with butyl side-chain and tertiary amino group β-hydroxy ethyl piperizine) against resistant cancer cell lines indicate that it might be a promising new hit for further development as an anti-MDR agent. The non-covalent interaction of these molecules with DNA duplexes have been investigated by ESI-MS technique. The results indicate, these acridone derivatives interact with duplex DNA by intercalation, possesses higher affinity to GC than AT base pairs of the DNA and they could not interact non-covalently with the minor grooves of the DNA. The ability of acridones to inhibit calmodulin dependent cAMP phosphodiesterase has been determined. The results suggest that acridones inhibit the Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulated cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity and have no direct effects on the enzyme itself and a strong correlation between calmodulin inhibition and cytotoxicity against HL-60/VINC and HL-60/DX MDR cancer cell lines.
    Article · Apr 2011 · European journal of pharmaceutical sciences: official journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The deoxynucleoside analogs cytarabine (Ara-C) and gemcitabine (dFdC) are widely used in the treatment of cancer. Due to their hydrophilic nature they need the equilibrative (hENT) and concentrative (hCNT) nucleoside transporters to enter the cell. To bypass drug resistance due to decreased uptake, lipophilic 5'elaidic acid esters were synthesized, elacytarabine (CP-4055, from ara-C) and CP-4126 (from gemcitabine), which are currently in clinical development for solid and hematological tumors. We investigated whether resistance can be induced in vitro, and treated the CEM leukemic cell line with weekly increasing elacytarabine concentrations, up to 0.28 microM (10 times IC(50)). The IC(50) of the resistant CEM/CP-4055 was 35 microM, about 1,000 times that of the wildtype CEM, and comparable to that of CEM/dCK- (deoxycytidine kinase deficient) (22 microM). CEM/CP-4055 was also cross-resistant to Ara-C, gemcitabine and CP-4126 (28 and 33 microM, respectively). A low level of mRNA dCK was observed, and similar to CEM/dCK-, CEM/CP-4055 did not accumulate Ara-CTP after exposure to Ara-C or elacytarabine, which is consistent with a deficiency in dCK. In conclusion, elacytarabine induced resistance similar to Ara-C. This resistance was caused by downregulation of dCK.
    Full-text Article · Jun 2010 · Nucleosides Nucleotides & Nucleic Acids
  • Gerrit Jansen · Rob Mauritz · Ietje Kathmann · [...] · Godefridus J. Peters
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This study evaluated cell membrane transport efficiencies of folate-based glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFT) inhibitors via the classical reduced folate carrier (RFC) or folate receptor (FR) in relation to their growth inhibitory potential. Two GARFT inhibitors, AG2032 and AG2034, and their 6R- or 6S-steroisosomers displayed efficient cellular uptake via RFC and even 5-6 fold more efficient uptake in cells harboring a mutated form of RFC. Moreover, appreciable binding affinity for FR also allowed efficient cellular uptake via a receptor-mediated route. Finally, one of the GARFT inhibitors, AG2037, retained marked biological activity in cells with high intracellular folate content. Together, this study identified selected GARFT inhibitors that can utilize multiple transport routes and retain biological activity over a broad range of intracellular folate content.
    Conference Paper · Dec 2009
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: A series of 2-fluoro N(10)-substituted acridone derivatives with varying alkyl side chain length with propyl, butyl substitution, and a tertiary amine group at the terminal end of the alkyl side chain were synthesized and screened against cancer cell lines SW 1573, SW 1573 2R 160 (P-gp substrate) which are non-small lung cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MCF-7/MR (BCRP substrate) are breast cancer cell lines, 2008 WT, 2008MRP1, 2008MRP2, 2008MRP3 are ovarian cancer cell lines, and human embryo kidney cell lines like HEK293, HEK293 MRP4, and HEK293 MRP5i. The propyl-series compounds showed lipophilicity in the range of 1.93 to 4.40 and the butyl series in the range of 2.37 to 4.78. The compounds 4, 7, and 8 showed good cytotoxicity against the 60 human cancer cell line panel of the National Cancer Institute, USA. The compounds 14 and 15 showed a better cytotoxicity in most of the cancer cell lines compared to other compounds tested. The DNA-binding properties of the compounds were evaluated based on their affinity or intercalation with CT-DNA measured with absorption titration. The compound 11 bearing planar tricyclic ring linked with a butyl methylpiperazino side chain showed the highest binding affinity with a binding constant (K(i)) of 10.38 x 10 M(-1). Evaluation of the compounds in cell lines with an overexpression of various multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), or Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) showed that all compounds are not substrates for any of these transporters.
    Full-text Article · Nov 2009 · Archiv der Pharmazie
  • Source
    C Lemos · I Kathmann · E Giovannetti · [...] · G J Peters
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The effect of folate status on breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated drug resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted drugs, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, was investigated in two human colon cancer cell lines, WiDr and Caco-2, of which the latter displayed greater sensitivity to these drugs due to high EGFR expression. Caco-2 LF/LV cells, growing under low-folate (LF) conditions, showed increased BCRP protein expression compared with the high-folate (HF) counterpart, which was associated with 1.8-fold resistance to gefitinib. Of note, the BCRP-specific inhibitor Ko143 completely reverted this phenotype. WiDr LF cells also showed slightly increased BCRP expression compared with the HF cells, but no differences in gefitinib sensitivity were observed. Both Caco-2 LF/LV and WiDr LF cells showed 2.4- and 2.3-fold resistance to erlotinib, respectively, compared with their HF counterparts, which mechanistically seemed BCRP unrelated, as Ko143 had no effect on erlotinib activity. In conclusion, our data suggest that in EGFR-expressing Caco-2 cells, BCRP is one of the determinants of gefitinib resistance but not of erlotinib resistance. Beyond this, folate depletion can provoke an additional decrease in gefitinib and erlotinib activity by mechanisms dependent or independent of BCRP modulation.
    Full-text Article · May 2009 · British Journal of Cancer
  • Source
    Lemos C · Kathmann I · Giovannetti E · [...] · Peters GJ
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The effect of folate status on breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated drug resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted drugs, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, was investigated in two human colon cancer cell lines, WiDr and Caco-2, of which the latter displayed greater sensitivity to these drugs due to high EGFR expression. Caco-2 LF/LV cells, growing under low-folate (LF) conditions, showed increased BCRP protein expression compared with the high-folate (HF) counterpart, which was associated with 1.8-fold resistance to gefitinib. Of note, the BCRP-specific inhibitor Ko143 completely reverted this phenotype. WiDr LF cells also showed slightly increased BCRP expression compared with the HF cells, but no differences in gefitinib sensitivity were observed. Both Caco-2 LF/LV and WiDr LF cells showed 2.4- and 2.3-fold resistance to erlotinib, respectively, compared with their HF counterparts, which mechanistically seemed BCRP unrelated, as Ko143 had no effect on erlotinib activity. In conclusion, our data suggest that in EGFR-expressing Caco-2 cells, BCRP is one of the determinants of gefitinib resistance but not of erlotinib resistance. Beyond this, folate depletion can provoke an additional decrease in gefitinib and erlotinib activity by mechanisms dependent or independent of BCRP modulation.
    Full-text Article · Apr 2009 · Cancer
  • Source
    Clara Lemos · Ietje Kathmann · Elisa Giovannetti · [...] · Godefridus J Peters
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: As cellular folate levels seem to have a different effect on cancer cells from different origins, we extended our initial study to a broader panel of cancer cells. BCRP and MRP1-5 expression was determined in KB, OVCAR-3, IGROV-1, ZR75-1/R/MTX, SCC-11B, SCC-22B, and WiDr either grown in standard RPMI 1640 containing 2.3 micromol/L supraphysiologic concentration of folic acid [high folate (HF)] or adapted to more physiologic concentrations [1-5 nmol/L folic acid or leucovorin; low folate (LF)]. Compared with the HF counterparts, KB LF cells displayed 16.1-fold increased MRP3 and OVCAR-3 LF cells showed 4.8-fold increased MRP4 mRNA levels along with increased MRP3 and MRP4 protein expression, respectively. A marked increase on BCRP protein and mRNA expression was observed in WiDr LF cells. These cells acquired approximately 2-fold resistance to mitoxantrone compared with the HF cell line, a phenotype that could be reverted by the BCRP inhibitor Ko143. Of note, WiDr cells expressed BCRP in the intracellular compartment, similarly to what we have described for Caco-2 cells. Our results provide further evidence for an important role of cellular folate status in the modulation of the expression of multidrug resistance transporters in cancer cells. We show that up-regulation of intracellularly localized BCRP in response to adaptation to LF conditions may be a common feature within a panel of colon cancer cell lines. Under these circumstances, folate supplementation might improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs by decreasing BCRP expression.
    Full-text Article · Mar 2009 · Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
  • Source
    Clara Lemos · Ietje Kathmann · Elisa Giovannetti · [...] · Godefridus J Peters
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Folates can induce the expression and activity of the breast-cancer-resistance-protein (BCRP) and the multidrug-resistance-protein-1 (MRP1). Our aim was to study the time-dependent effect of folate deprivation/supplementation on (i) BCRP and MRP expression and (ii) on drug resistance mediated by these transporters. Therefore Caco-2 colon cancer cells usually grown in standard RPMI-medium containing supraphysiological folic acid (FA) concentrations (2.3 muM; high-folate, HF) were gradually adapted to more physiological folate concentrations (1 nM leucovorin (LV) or 1 nM FA; low-folate, LF), resulting in the sublines Caco-2-LF/LV and Caco-2-LF/FA. Caco-2-LF/LV and LF/FA cells exhibited a maximal increase of 5.2- and 9.6-fold for BCRP-mRNA and 3.9- and 5.7-fold for BCRP protein expression, respectively, but no major changes on MRP expression. Overexpression of BCRP in the LF-cells resulted in 3.6- to 6.3-fold resistance to mitoxantrone (MR), which was completely reverted by the BCRP inhibitor Ko143. On the other hand, LF-adapted cells were markedly more sensitive to methotrexate than the HF-counterpart, both after 4-hr (9,870- and 23,923-fold for Caco-2-LF/LV and LF/FA, respectively) and 72-hr (11- and 22-fold for Caco-2-LF/LV and LF/FA, respectively) exposure. Immunofluorescent staining observed with a confocal-laser-scan-microscope revealed that in Caco-2 cells (both HF and LF), BCRP is mainly located in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, folate deprivation induces BCRP expression associated with MR resistance in Caco-2 cells. The intracellular localization of BCRP in these cells suggests that this transporter is not primarily extruding its substrates out of the cell, but rather to an intracellular compartment where folates can be kept as storage.
    Full-text Article · Oct 2008 · International Journal of Cancer
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Oxaliplatin is used for treatment of colon cancer in combination with 5-fluorouracil or irinotecan. Oxaliplatin has similar, but also different resistant mechanisms as cisplatin. We studied the activity of oxaliplatin in ovarian and colon cancer cells with different resistance patterns to cisplatin. The 40-fold cisplatin-resistant cell line ADDP was only 7.5-fold resistant to oxaliplatin. The gemcitabine-resistant AG6000 cell line, 9-fold resistant to cisplatin, was not cross-resistant. LoVo-175X2, with mutant p53 showed no resistance compared to the empty vector control. However, LoVo-Li, with inactive p53, was 3.6-fold resistant corresponding to decreased accumulation and Pt adducts. Accumulation and DNA adducts formation showed no significant correlation with oxaliplatin sensitivity. Cell cycle distribution after exposure to oxaliplatin showed arrest in G2/M (A2780) or in S-phase (LoVo-92) for wt-p53 cells. ADDP and LoVo-Li showed G1 arrest followed by S-phase arrest and no changes in distribution, respectively. The cell cycle related proteins Cyclins A and B1 and (p)CDC25C were marginally affected by oxaliplatin. Expression of hCTR1 was decreased in ADDP, LoVo-Li and AG6000, OCT1 decreased in ADDP and AG6000 and OCT3 in LoVo-175X2, compared to the parental cell lines. In ADDP and LoVo-175X2 ATP7A and B were decreased but were increased in AG6000. From this study it can be concluded that changes in cell cycle distribution were cell line dependent and not related to changes in expression of Cyclin A or B1. Oxaliplatin accumulation was related to hCTR1 and, at low concentration, ATP7A to DNA adducts formation while the retention was related to hCTR1, OCT2 and ATP7B.
    Full-text Article · Aug 2008 · Biochemical pharmacology

Publication Stats

1k Citations

Institutions

  • 1998-2013
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1989
    • Utrecht University
      • Division of Internal Medicine
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands