Naomi Oizumi

Japan Community Healthcare Organization Sapporo Hokushin Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan

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Publications (36)59.5 Total impact

  • A Urita · T Funakoshi · N Suenaga · N Oizumi · N Iwasaki
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    ABSTRACT: This pilot study reports the clinical outcomes of a combination of partial subscapularis tendon transfer and small-head hemiarthroplasty in patients with rotatator cuff arthropathy. A total of 30 patients (30 shoulders; eight men and 22 women) with a mean age of 74 years (55 to 84) were assessed at a mean follow-up of 31 months (24 to 60). The inclusion criteria were painful cuff tear arthropathy with normal deltoid function and a non-degenerative subscapularis muscle and tendon and a preserved teres minor. Outcome was assessed using the University of California Los Angeles score, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, and the Oxford Shoulder Score. Radiographic measurements included the centre of rotation distance and the length of the deltoid. All clinical scores were significantly improved post-operatively. The active flexion and external rotation improved significantly at the most recent follow-up (p < 0.035). Although the mean centre of rotation distance changed significantly (p < 0.001), the mean length of the deltoid did not change significantly from the pre-operative value (p = 0.29). The change in the length of the deltoid with < 100° flexion was significantly less than that with > 100° (p < 0.001). Progressive erosion of the glenoid was seen in four patients. No patient required revision or further surgery. A combination of partial subscapularis tendon transfer and small-head hemiarthroplasty effectively restored function and relieved pain in patients with rotator cuff arthropathy. Cite this article: 2015;97-B:1090-5. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Bone and Joint Journal
  • N Oizumi · N Suenaga · C Yoshioka · S Yamane
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    ABSTRACT: To prevent insufficiency of the triceps after total elbow arthroplasty, we have, since 2008, used a triceps-sparing ulnar approach. This study evaluates the clinical results and post-operative alignment of the prosthesis using this approach. We reviewed 25 elbows in 23 patients. There were five men and 18 women with a mean age of 69 years (54 to 83). There were 18 elbows with rheumatoid arthritis, six with a fracture or pseudoarthrosis and one elbow with osteoarthritis. Post-operative complications included one intra-operative fracture, one elbow with heterotopic ossification, one transient ulnar nerve palsy, and one elbow with skin necrosis, but no elbow was affected by insufficiency of the triceps. Patients were followed for a mean of 42 months (24 to 77). The mean post-operative Japanese Orthopaedic Association Elbow Score was 90.8 (51 to 100) and the mean Mayo Elbow Performance score 93.8 (65 to 100). The mean post-operative flexion/extension of the elbow was 135°/-8°. The Manual Muscle Testing score of the triceps was 5 in 23 elbows and 2 in two elbows (one patient). The mean alignment of the implants examined by 3D-CT was 2.8° pronation (standard deviation (sd) 5.5), 0.3° valgus (sd 2.7), and 0.7° extension (sd 3.2) for the humeral component, and 9.3° pronation (sd 9.7), 0.3° valgus (sd 4.0), and 8.6° extension (sd 3.1) for the ulnar component. There was no radiolucent line or loosening of the implants on the final radiographs. The triceps-sparing ulnar approach allows satisfactory alignment of the implants, is effective in preventing post-operative triceps insufficiency, and gives satisfactory short-term results. Cite this article: 2015;97-B:1096-1101. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Bone and Joint Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. To determine the association of the area of sensory disturbance with the area of suprascapular nerve (SSN) palsy in healthy volunteers and patients with SSN palsy. Methods. Five male and one female and healthy volunteers aged 23 to 44 (mean age, 32.2) years underwent an experiment of distal and proximal SSN block (at the spinoglenoid notch and suprascapular notch, respectively). A pinprick test was performed to determine pain sensation and the area of sensory disturbance. In addition, records of 21 male and 19 female patients aged 21 to 75 (mean, 54.1) years who underwent arthroscopic SSN release for SSN palsy were reviewed. The same pinprick test was performed. Results. After distal SSN block, 5 volunteers had a sensory deficit in the area below the scapular spine only, and one had no sensory deficit. After proximal SSN block, the sensory deficit spread to both lateral and medial sides above and below the scapular spine. In the 40 patients with SSN palsy, only 5 (12.5%) patients exhibited no sensory deficit above the scapular spine; 4 of them had ganglion cysts and one had entrapment of the nerve at the spinoglenoid notch. In 30 patients with palsy at the suprascapular notch, all had sensory deficit in the lateral side above the scapular spine. In 5 patients with ganglion and one patient with palsy at the spinoglenoid notch, sensory deficit was noted below (and not above) the scapular spine in all patients except for one. Conclusion. The area of sensory disturbance is associated with the area of SSN palsy.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Journal of orthopaedic surgery (Hong Kong)
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    ABSTRACT: Bone marrow stimulation (BMS) at the footprint of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has not been fully evaluated according to the preoperative tear size and surgical technique. In this study, we investigated the effect of BMS on cuff repair integrity after an arthroscopic surface-holding (ASH) repair. A total of 111 patients (mean age, 64.5 years) with chronic rotator cuff tears who underwent treatment by the ASH method with BMS by drilling of multiple holes at the footprint (67 shoulders) or without BMS (44 shoulders) were studied, and all patients were observed prospectively. Sugaya's classification was used to evaluate cuff integrity by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging, with types IV and V classified as rotator cuff retears. The mean scores for cuff integrity were 2.2 ± 0.2 and 1.7 ± 0.2 in the non-BMS and BMS groups, respectively. The mean scores were similar between the 2 groups for medium tears; however, scores for large-massive tears were significantly lower in the BMS group. The overall retear rate was 23.9% in the non-BMS group and 9.1% in the BMS group, and the distribution of repair types differed significantly. For large-massive tears, the retear rate was much higher in the non-BMS group (28.6%) than in the BMS group (4.5%), although the rates for medium tears were comparable between the 2 groups. These findings demonstrate that applying BMS to the footprint during ASH repair results in improved cuff repair integrity, particularly in large-massive tears, and suggest the importance of biologic treatment for rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
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    ABSTRACT: Background Although cadaveric studies have revealed suprascapular notch shape variations, few have investigated the association between suprascapular notch variation and age or gender. The purpose of this study was to investigate suprascapular notch shape variations by use of three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and to determine if there was any association with age or gender. Methods Three-dimensional CT images of 762 shoulders of 762 patients were analyzed in this study. Participants comprised 404 men and 358 women, with an average age of 58.2 ± 19.1 years. Suprascapular notch shape variations were classified into six types on the basis of Rengachary’s classification. Results Of the total study population, 11.4 % were classified as type I, 23.5 % as type II, 30.1 % as type III, 14.8 % as type IV, 15.9 % as type V, and 4.3 % as type VI. Average age was 56.5 ± 20.5 years for type I, 57.0 ± 19.5 years for type II, 55.5 ± 20.0 years for type III, 56.4 ± 18.5 years for type IV, 65.5 ± 14.4 years for type V, and 68.0 ± 13.4 years for type VI. Statistically significant age differences were found between types I–IV and V, between types I–IV and VI, and between the non-ossification group (types I–IV) and the ossification group (types V and VI). Male-to-female ratio among each type, and between the non-ossification group and the ossification group, were not statistically significantly different. Conclusions Our results suggest that transverse scapular ligament ossification is associated with aging whereas individual variation explains differences among types I, II, III, and IV. Three-dimensional CT provides useful information for arthroscopic resection of the transverse scapular ligament, when the wide variety of suprascapular notch shape variations is considered. Level of evidence Level IV
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Orthopaedic Science
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    ABSTRACT: Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provides satisfactory results; however, there is still a high rate of re-tear. The objective of this study was to present a surface-holding technique that we recently developed for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in detail and to evaluate the clinical outcome as well as cuff repair integrity with this new method. A consecutive series of 116 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic surface-holding repair and were monitored with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Constant-Murley, and University of California-Los Angeles scores to assess the clinical outcome. The mean follow-up period was 17.9 months (range, 12-40 months). Cuff repair integrity was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. All 3 rating systems at the time of final follow-up reflected a significant improvement in functional recovery of the shoulder compared with the preoperative scores. The overall rate of rotator cuff retear was 19.0% (22 of 116 shoulders), and the rates were 13.6% (9 of 66 shoulders) for small and medium-sized tears and 26% (13 of 50 shoulders) for large and massive tears. The rate for large and massive tears was much higher in patients older than 70 years (58.3%) compared with those younger than 70 years (36.3%), whereas the retear rates were similar in these 2 groups (22.2% and 17.5%, respectively). Arthroscopic surface-holding repair technique with medial suture and transosseous fixation improved rotator cuff healing. This method may be useful both for young patients and for elderly patients, who frequently have chronic large and massive tears, including osteoporotic bones.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
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    ABSTRACT: Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provides satisfactory results; however, there is still a high rate of re-tear. The objective of this study was to present a surface-holding technique that we recently developed for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in detail and to evaluate the clinical outcome as well as cuff repair integrity with this new method. Materials and methods A consecutive series of 116 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic surface-holding repair and were monitored with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Constant-Murley, and University of California–Los Angeles scores to assess the clinical outcome. The mean follow-up period was 17.9 months (range, 12-40 months). Cuff repair integrity was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. Results All 3 rating systems at the time of final follow-up reflected a significant improvement in functional recovery of the shoulder compared with the preoperative scores. The overall rate of rotator cuff retear was 19.0% (22 of 116 shoulders), and the rates were 13.6% (9 of 66 shoulders) for small and medium-sized tears and 26% (13 of 50 shoulders) for large and massive tears. The rate for large and massive tears was much higher in patients older than 70 years (58.3%) compared with those younger than 70 years (36.3%), whereas the retear rates were similar in these 2 groups (22.2% and 17.5%, respectively). Conclusions Arthroscopic surface-holding repair technique with medial suture and transosseous fixation improved rotator cuff healing. This method may be useful both for young patients and for elderly patients, who frequently have chronic large and massive tears, including osteoporotic bones.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Open Journal of Orthopedics
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    ABSTRACT: : The clinical results of surgical procedures for severe Sprengel deformity have been uncertain. To obtain improved elevation, we consider that it is necessary to realign the lateral border of the scapula for upward rotation. The purposes of the current study were to evaluate the clinical results and range of motion of the scapula after such realignment. : Seven cases of Sprengel deformity of Cavendish grade 3 or 4 were treated surgically and then clinically evaluated and examined using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT). (Two boys and 5 girls aged 50.9±15.4 mo, mean±SD at the time of operation.) The mean follow-up was 53.1 months (range, 12 to 92 mo). After the omovertebral bone and the superomedial side of the scapula were removed, the levator scapulae and rhomboids were reattached to wrap around the scapula at maximum upward rotation to assist in maintaining this position. Cavendish and Rigault grades were used for evaluation of postoperative appearance. The superior displacement and rotation of the scapula were measured on the trunk posterior view using 3D CT. The relationship between improvement in the range of motion and radiologic change were analyzed statistically. : The postoperative flexion (97.9±12.9 to 160±11.5 degrees) and abduction (99.3±13.0 to 161.4±15.7 degrees) were significantly improved compared with the mean preoperative values (P<0.0001). 3D CT revealed that in all patients the malrotation of the scapula was improved postoperatively. The current study shows that successful realignment of the scapula led to these improved clinical results. : Our procedure has advantages not only for recovery of the range of motion but also for reducing the characteristic lump in the web of the neck. However, our procedure has an inherent limitation related to asymmetric shoulder level and width. 3D CT may be useful for preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation. : Level IV-case series.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Journal of pediatric orthopedics

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study are to evaluate the clinical and radiographic mid- to long-term outcomes of patients treated by teres minor with bone pedicle transfer for irreparable massive rotator cuff tear and to investigate the limitations of this procedure. Clinical outcomes were assessed by quantifying: the range of shoulder motion; a visual analog pain scale; the University of California, Los Angeles Shoulder Score (UCLA score); and the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score. Radiographs were assessed for deterioration of the glenohumeral joint and upper migration of the humeral head. Eighteen patients with mean age of 66.9 years and mean follow-up of 74.4 months were included. The technique resulted in significant decrease in shoulder pain. The mean UCLA score improved from 10.3 points initially to 24.1 points at time of final follow-up. However, the postoperative results were classified as poor in 11 shoulders. The mean postoperative DASH score was 27.6 points. The mean active forward elevation significantly improved from 75.9° initially to 121.6° at time of final follow-up. In radiographic assessment, osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint progressed in 15 shoulders, and the upper migration of humeral head progressed in 14 shoulders. Aggravation of the glenohumeral joint and upper migration of the humeral head both progressed postoperatively at a high rate. Therefore, we conclude that this procedure should no longer be performed despite its relative simplicity.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of Orthopaedic Science
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    ABSTRACT: The distribution of subchondral bone density well reflects long-term resultant stress acting on an articular surface in living joints. Consequently, a measurement of the distribution pattern can determine the stress distribution across the elbow joint surface under long-term loading conditions of baseball pitching. Our purpose was to elucidate the characteristic alterations in the distribution pattern of subchondral bone density across the forearm bones of the elbow with pitching activities. The hypothesis is that pitching activities would change the stress distribution in living subjects. The analysis was performed using computed tomography (CT) images obtained from the dominant elbow of ten nonthrowing athletes (control group), ten college baseball fielders (fielder group), and ten college baseball pitchers (pitcher group). The distribution pattern of subchondral bone density through the articular surface of the proximal radius and ulna bones was assessed using CT osteoabsorptiometry. The maximum density area was located in the posterior part of the trochlea notch in all study participants. This maximum density area was significantly increased in the baseball groups compared with that in the control group. The pitcher group also showed a significant distribution of the maximum density area in the anterior part of the radial head. Our analysis indicates that pitching activities increase actual stress on the articular surface not only in the posterior part of the trochlea notch but also in the anterior part of the radial head. The stress across the elbow may be expanded from the ulnohumeral to the radiohumeral joint by repetitive pitching activities in living subjects.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2012 · Journal of Orthopaedic Science
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, retear rate after repair for massive cuff tear have been improved through devised suture techniques. However, reported retear rate is relevant to preoperative atrophy and fatty degeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether preoperative atrophy and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles improve by successful repair. Twenty-four patients with massive rotator cuff tear were evaluated on the recovery of atrophy and fatty degeneration of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle after surgery. Atrophy was classified by the occupation ratio and fatty degeneration by modified Goutallier's classification. Both were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after the operation. When the cuff was well repaired, improvement of the atrophy and fatty degeneration were observed in a half and a one-fourth of the cases, respectively. In retear cases, however, atrophy and fatty degeneration became worse. Improvement of atrophy and fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles may be expected in the cases with successful achievement of rotator cuff repair for large and massive tear.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012
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    ABSTRACT: The existence of sensory branches of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) has recently been reported, and sensory disturbance at the lateral and posterior aspect of the shoulder has been focused on as a symptom of SSN palsy. We have performed arthroscopic release of SSN at the suprascapular notch in patients with sensory disturbance since 2006. The purposes of this study were to introduce the arthroscopic surgical technique and investigate postoperative recovery of sensory disturbance. The study included 11 men and 14 women (25 shoulders), with an average age of 63.9 years (range, 41-77 years). Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN was performed using a suprascapular nerve (SN) portal as a landmark for approaching the suprascapular notch. Sensory disturbance of the shoulder was evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. The average follow-up was 18.5 months (range, 12-30 months). The arthroscopic procedures were performed safely. The preoperative sensory disturbance fully recovered postoperatively in all shoulders. Arthroscopic release of the SSN is a useful procedure for SSN entrapment at the suprascapular notch. The sensory disturbance at the lateral and posterior aspect of the shoulder can be used as one of the criteria of diagnosing SSN palsy, especially in shoulders with massive rotator cuff tear, in which diagnosing and assessing the treatment results of associated SSN palsy is usually difficult.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
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    ABSTRACT: We report a classification system based on the changes in shape of the glenoid fossa and on an evaluation of the upward migration of the humeral head, because a simple classification based on X-ray evaluation would be of great assistance to physicians dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of RA. We evaluated 150 shoulders of 118 RA patients who showed changes in the glenoid fossa after radiological examinations. The morphology of the glenoid fossa of the RA shoulder was classified into 3 types and we were able to classify a total of six types of deformities by adding the problem of upward migration of the humeral head. An additional investigation on the difference in the type of deformity between the right and left shoulder, the changes in type during the course of the study, and the relationship between this particular classification and certain patient characteristics was also included.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2011 · International Journal of Rheumatology
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the outcome of arthroscopic debridement with continuous irrigation in patients with septic arthritis of the shoulder joint. Methods Ten patients (four men, six women) with septic arthritis of the shoulder joint were treated with a combination of arthroscopic debridement and continuous irrigation. All patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years. The average age was 61.7 years with a range of 25 to 86. The etiology of infection was determined to be a subacromial injection in six cases, EMG needle puncture in one, hematogenous in two, and unknown in one case. Causative bacteria, follow-up period, recurrence, shoulder pain, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, and radiographic findings were evaluated. Result Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in six cases, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, in four cases. The average follow-up period was 103.3 months with a range of 48 to 199. The infection was eradicated completely with a single arthroscopic debridement with continuous irrigation in nine patients. One patient required a second operation. In all patients, severe pain before operation improved. The average UCLA shoulder score increased from 5.7 points prior to the operation to a post-operation score of 26.4 points. In standard radiographic findings, five cases had aggravated osteoarthritis in the affected joint. Conclusion This study shows that arthroscopic debridement with continuous irrigation for septic arthritis of the shoulder joint improves shoulder pain, functional scores, and subjective outcome and prevents recurrence in many cases.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2011

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
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    ABSTRACT: The distribution pattern of subchondral bone density is considered to closely reflect the stress distribution across a joint under physiological loading conditions. Our purpose was to determine alterations in the distribution pattern of subchondral bone density across the distal articular surfaces of the radius and the ulna in patients with Kienböck disease after radial shortening. We collected preoperative and postoperative computed tomography (CT) image data from 7 wrists of 7 patients who had undergone radial shortening for Kienböck disease. We measured the distribution of subchondral bone density through the distal articular surface of the radius and the ulna using a CT osteoabsorptiometry method. The obtained data were quantitatively assessed by calculating the high-density area ratio of the entire radiocarpal joint surface, scaphoid fossa, lunate fossa, and distal ulnar surface. At the mean postoperative period of 27 months, the mean high-density area ratio in the entire distal articular surface of the radius significantly decreased from 0.413 preoperatively to 0.141 postoperatively. The postoperative value in each fossa demonstrated a significant reduction from 0.253 to 0.096 in the scaphoid fossa and from 0.160 to 0.045 in the lunate fossa. No significant alteration in the value was found in the distal ulna at follow-up. Our CT osteoabsorptiometry analysis suggests that the distribution of subchondral bone density in both scaphoid and lunate fossae notably decreases after radial shortening. This indicates that radial shortening unloads the lunate by reducing the actual stress across the distal articular surface of the radius in subjects with Kienböck disease. Therapeutic IV.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · The Journal of hand surgery

Publication Stats

228 Citations
59.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011-2015
    • Japan Community Healthcare Organization Sapporo Hokushin Hospital
      Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan
  • 2012
    • Spokane Joint Replacement Center
      Spokane, Washington, United States
  • 2003-2012
    • Hokkaido University
      • • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      • • Graduate School of Medicine
      Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan
  • 2007-2009
    • Hokkaido University Hospital
      • Division of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan
  • 2002
    • Hokkaido Memorial Hospital Of Urology
      Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan