Ahmad Bahonar

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Ostān-e Eşfahān, Iran

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Publications (62)115.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective To examine and compare tobacco marketing in 16 countries while the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control requires parties to implement a comprehensive ban on such marketing. Methods Between 2009 and 2012, a kilometre-long walk was completed by trained investigators in 462 communities across 16 countries to collect data on tobacco marketing. We interviewed community members about their exposure to traditional and non-traditional marketing in the previous six months. To examine differences in marketing between urban and rural communities and between high-, middle- and low-income countries, we used multilevel regression models controlling for potential confounders. Findings Compared with high-income countries, the number of tobacco advertisements observed was 81 times higher in low-income countries (incidence rate ratio, IRR: 80.98; 95% confidence interval, CI: 4.15–1578.42) and the number of tobacco outlets was 2.5 times higher in both low- and lower-middle-income countries (IRR: 2.58; 95% CI: 1.17–5.67 and IRR: 2.52; CI: 1.23–5.17, respectively). Of the 11 842 interviewees, 1184 (10%) reported seeing at least five types of tobacco marketing. Self-reported exposure to at least one type of traditional marketing was 10 times higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries (odds ratio, OR: 9.77; 95% CI: 1.24–76.77). For almost all measures, marketing exposure was significantly lower in the rural communities than in the urban communities. Conclusion Despite global legislation to limit tobacco marketing, it appears ubiquitous. The frequency and type of tobacco marketing varies on the national level by income group and by community type, appearing to be greatest in low-income countries and urban communities.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Bulletin of the World Health Organisation
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to find the influence of education level on the trends of changes of these risk factors among a great sample of Iranian population. This cross-sectional study is a secondary analysis of Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP). Blood samples were taken to determine the lipid levels including total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. Education categorized based on training system in Iran as 1-5, 6-12, and more than 12 years training. The prevalence of diabetes was higher among illiterate participants in both areas. Hypertension was more prevalent in illiterate subjects (2001; 44.0% and 2007; 46.3%) in intervention area (P < 0.001). Dyslipidemia was more prevalent among illiterate people (P < 0.001). In the intervention, illiterates have higher BMI in both 2001 and 2007 (P < 0.001). The prevalence of current smoking was the highest in education level range 6 to 12 years and was steadily decreased in higher education levels (P < 0.001). Subjects with 6-12 years of education have more unhealthy nutritional habits in both areas. In 2001, subjects with 12 years of education or more had more physical activity than other groups (P < 0.001), whereas, in 2007, subjects with 6-12 years of education were more active (P < 0.001). Although the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension obesity, and dyslipidemia are more in illiterate subjects and prevalence of diabetes and hyperlipidemia was sharply decreased with education level, it seems that well educated participants have higher daily physically activity compared with those who have lower education without considering the place or residency.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015
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    ABSTRACT: It is now hypothesized whether restricted salt intake can be a potential precursor to renal dysfunction in mild hypertension state. We aimed to study the association between salt intake and renal function in patients with mild hypertension. One hundred consecutive hypertensive Iranian patients (with systolic blood pressure 140-160 mmHg and/or diastolic 90-100 mmHg) who were referred to the hypertension research center, Isfahan, Iran, between 2011 and 2014 for screening of hypertension were assessed. Renal function was assessed by measuring serum creatinine (Cr) and creatinine clearance (CrCl). Daily salt intake was assessed on the basis of 24 h urinary sodium excretion. There was no association between the amounts of sodium intake and serum Cr concentration (r = 0.138, P = 0.174), however, an association was revealed between sodium intake and value of CrCl (r = 0.303, P = 0.003). Multivariable linear regression model showed that sodium intake could effectively predict renal function assessed by CrCl (Beta = 0.070, P = 0.016). There is an association between sodium intake and reservation of renal function in mild hypertension state and thus by restriction of dietary salt intake, reserving renal function, and preventing appearance and progression of renal insufficiency in higher degrees of hypertension can be facilitated.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · ARYA Atherosclerosis
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death in Iran. The present study evaluated the 7-year incidence of CVD risk factors among the participants of Isfahan cohort study (ICS). ICS was a longitudinal study on adults over 35 years of age from the urban and rural areas in three counties in central Iran. Data on clinical examination and blood measurements were collected in 2001. Subjects were followed and similar data were collected in 2007. Cumulative incidence was calculated through dividing new cases of each risk factor by the population free of that risk factor at baseline. Incidence proportion was determined for major CVD risk factors including hypertension (HTN), hypercholesterolemia (HC), hypertriglyceridemia (HTg), obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), metabolic syndrome (MetS), and smoking. A total number of 6323 adults free of CVDs were recruited. After 7 years of follow-up, 3283 individuals were re-evaluated in 2007. The participants' age was 49.2 ± 10.3 years in 2001 (mean ± SD). The 7-year cumulative incidence of HTN, HC, HTg, overweight, obesity, DM, MetS, and smoking was 22.8%, 37.4%, 28.0%, 26.3%, 7.4%, 9.5%, 23.9%, and 5.9% in men and 22.2%, 55.4%, 33.5%, 35.0%, 18.8%, 11.3%, 36.1%, and 0.7% in women, respectively. Among those with overweight or obesity, 14.7% of men and 7.9% of women decreased their weight up to the normal level. The present study revealed a high incidence of CVD risk factors especially dyslipidemia, obesity, MetS and HTN. Therefore, the application of life-style modification interventions seems necessary.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Health volunteers can have a great effect by training the population about prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and lifestyle modification. This study evaluated the health volunteers’ knowledge following the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) that was performed between 2000 and 2006. Materials and Methods: In this study, 491 females were selected among health volunteers in the Isfahan and Najafabad districts as intervention areas and Arak as a reference area through 2000-2001 until 2006. They participated in training courses on CVD, its complications, methods of prevention of risk factors control as well healthy lifestyle promotion. The health volunteers’ level of knowledge was assessed before and after training. Results: Before intervention, there was no significant difference between the scores of health volunteers in the intervention and the control regions in terms of knowledge about recognizing the symptoms, complications and prevention of CVD and relevant risk factors and healthy lifestyle. However, their knowledge scores increased significantly in the fields of CVD (β = 0.13, P = 0.04), hypertension (β = 0.18, P = 0.009), healthy nutrition (β = 0.19, P = 0.007), appropriate physical activity (β = 0.17, P = 0.01) and dealing with stress (β = 0.16, P = 0.02) after trainings. Conclusion: The 6 year interventional program of IHHP showed that training health volunteers on prevention of CVD, their risk factors and modification of lifestyle continued to be effective even in a long time.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · International Journal of Health Promotion and Education

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    ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Daily sodium consumption is an important risk factor for HTN. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between positive family history for HTN and salt sensitivity of blood pressure in normotensive individuals. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 130 normotensive individuals aged from 18 to 60 years were included. Demographic characteristics and family histories of HTN (in father, mother, brother, and sister) were obtained. On the first day, each individual received10 mmol of sodium and a low-calorie diet and two liters of normal saline (500 ml/hr); and two hours afterward, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured. On the second day, the same diet as the first day and three doses of oral Furosemide (40 mg each) were ordered and the MAP was calculated. Individuals with a decrease of MAP >10 nunHg were defined as "salt sensitive” and those with a decrease of MAP <5 mniHg were categorized as "salt insensitive”. Results: Of the participants, 99 (76.2%) were male and 38 (29.2%) had a positive family history of HTN. Also 16 (12.3%), 18 (13.8%), 2 (1.5%), and 0 (0.0%) had a positive history of HTN diagnosed for their fathers, mothers, sisters, and brothers respectively. Also, 52 (40%), 32 (24.6%), and 46 (35.4%) patients were salt sensitive, intermediate, and salt insensitive, respectively. There were no significant differences between the three groups of salt sensitivity in the distribution of positive family history of HTN (all P values>0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed no association between a positive family history of HTN and salt sensitivity of blood pressure.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Iranian Heart Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Brewer’s yeast may have beneficial effects on insulin receptors because of itsglucose tolerance factor in diabetic patients. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brewer’s yeast supplementation on glycemic indices in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: In a randomized double‑blind controlled clinical trial, 84 adults (21 men and 63 women) aged 46.3 ± 6.1 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: Supplement group receiving brewer’s yeast (six 300mg tablets/day, total 1800 mg) and control group receiving placebo (six 300mg tablets/day) for 12 weeks. Body weight, height, body mass index, food consumption (based on 24h food record), fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance were measured before and after the intervention. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 18.0). Results: The changes in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity were significantly different between the two groups during the study (respectively P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.02 independent sample t‑test). There was a significant difference in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity at the end of the study between the two groups after removing the effects of baseline values (respectively P = 0.002, P < 0.001, P = 0.02, analysis of covariance). Changes in body mass index, 24h food record, insulin resistance were not significant. Conclusions: Dietary supplementation with brewer›s yeast besides the usual treatment of diabetes can ameliorate blood glucose variables in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · International journal of preventive medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Brewer's yeast may have beneficial effects on insulin receptors because of itsglucose tolerance factor in diabetic patients. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brewer's yeast supplementation on glycemic indices in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, 84 adults (21 men and 63 women) aged 46.3 ± 6.1 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: Supplement group receiving brewer's yeast (six 300mg tablets/day, total 1800 mg) and control group receiving placebo (six 300mg tablets/day) for 12 weeks. Body weight, height, body mass index, food consumption (based on 24h food record), fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance were measured before and after the intervention. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 18.0). The changes in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity were significantly different between the two groups during the study (respectively P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.02 independent sample t-test). There was a significant difference in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity at the end of the study between the two groups after removing the effects of baseline values (respectively P = 0.002, P < 0.001, P = 0.02, analysis of covariance). Changes in body mass index, 24h food record, insulin resistance were not significant. Dietary supplementation with brewer›s yeast besides the usual treatment of diabetes can ameliorate blood glucose variables in type 2 diabetes mellitus.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · International journal of preventive medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background. There is a little published data regarding the association between salt intake and albuminuria as an important alarm for progression of cardiovascular and renal dysfunction. We aimed to assess this relationship to emphasize the major role of restricting salt intake to minimize albuminuria and prevent these life-threatening events. Methods. The study population comprised 820 individuals. Participants were assigned to groups as follows: normal albuminuria, slight albuminuria, and clinical albuminuria. Daily salt intake was assessed on the basis of 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, since urinary sodium excretion largely equals sodium intake. Results. In normotensive participants, the mean level of urine albumin was higher in those who had higher amounts of salt intake with a significantly upward trend (the mean urinary albumin level in low-salt-diet group, in medium-salt-intake group, and in high-salt-intake group was 42.70 ± 36.42, 46.89 ± 38.91, and 53.38 ± 48.23, resp., (P = 0.017)). There was a significant positive correlation between 24-hour urinary sodium secretion and the level of urine albumin (beta = 0.130, P < 0.001). The amount of salt intake was significantly associated with urine albumin concentration (beta = 3.969, SE = 1.671, P = 0.018). Conclusion. High salt intake was shown to be associated with higher level of microalbuminuria even adjusted for potential underlying risk factors.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · International Journal of Hypertension
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertension is the most important preventable cause of morbidity and mortality globally, yet there are relatively few data collected using standardized methods. To examine hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control in participants at baseline in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study. A cross-sectional study of 153,996 adults (complete data for this analysis on 142,042) aged 35 to 70 years, recruited between January 2003 and December 2009. Participants were from 628 communities in 3 high-income countries (HIC), 10 upper-middle-income and low-middle-income countries (UMIC and LMIC), and 4 low-income countries (LIC). Hypertension was defined as individuals with self-reported treated hypertension or with an average of 2 blood pressure measurements of at least 140/90 mm Hg using an automated digital device. Awareness was based on self-reports, treatment was based on the regular use of blood pressure-lowering medications, and control was defined as individuals with blood pressure lower than 140/90 mm Hg. Among the 142,042 participants, 57,840 (40.8%; 95% CI, 40.5%-41.0%) had hypertension and 26,877 (46.5%; 95% CI, 46.1%-46.9%) were aware of the diagnosis. Of those who were aware of the diagnosis, the majority (23,510 [87.5%; 95% CI, 87.1%-87.9%] of those who were aware) were receiving pharmacological treatments, but only a minority of those receiving treatment were controlled (7634 [32.5%; 95% CI, 31.9%-33.1%]). Overall, 30.8%, 95% CI, 30.2%-31.4% of treated patients were taking 2 or more types of blood pressure-lowering medications. The percentages aware (49.0% [95% CI, 47.8%-50.3%] in HICs, 52.5% [95% CI, 51.8%-53.2%] in UMICs, 43.6% [95% CI, 42.9%-44.2%] in LMICs, and 40.8% [95% CI, 39.9%-41.8%] in LICs) and treated (46.7% [95% CI, 45.5%-47.9%] in HICs, 48.3%, [95% CI, 47.6%-49.1%] in UMICs, 36.9%, [95% CI, 36.3%-37.6%] in LMICs, and 31.7% [95% CI, 30.8%-32.6%] in LICs) were lower in LICs compared with all other countries for awareness (P <.001) and treatment (P <.001). Awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension were higher in urban communities compared with rural ones in LICs (urban vs rural, P <.001) and LMICs (urban vs rural, P <.001), but similar for other countries. Low education was associated with lower rates of awareness, treatment, and control in LICs, but not in other countries. Among a multinational study population, 46.5% of participants with hypertension were aware of the diagnosis, with blood pressure control among 32.5% of those being treated. These findings suggest substantial room for improvement in hypertension diagnosis and treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
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    Hossein Hajianfar · Zamzam Paknahad · Ahmad Bahonar
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in which antioxidant capacity changes. Omega-3 fatty acids have extensive biological effects including their advantage on lipoprotein metabolism, platelet function, cytokine production, clotting, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements on antioxidant capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. This clinical trial enrolled 71 women with type 2 diabetes in two case (treated with omega-3 capsules) and control (treated with placebo) groups. In the first stage, participants filled out a demographics questionnaire including age, height, weight, waist circumference, and hip circumference.Their blood sample was taken to evaluate glycosylated hemoglobin and antioxidant capacity. Then the case group received intervention for 8 weeks and weight, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured and a blood sample was taken again. The data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software. The mean difference of antioxidant capacity before and after intervention was significant (P < 0.001). Antioxidant capacity increased in the case group and reduced in the control group. With regard to the results of the present study, patients with type 2 diabetes increase their antioxidant capacity, enhance their antioxidant defense system, and probably prevent diabetes complications and related disease progress by taking omega-3 supplements.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · International journal of preventive medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Importance Little is known about adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors among individuals with a coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke event in communities across a range of countries worldwide. Objective To examine the prevalence of avoidance or cessation of smoking, eating a healthy diet, and undertaking regular physical activities by individuals with a CHD or stroke event. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) was a large, prospective cohort study that used an epidemiological survey of 153 996 adults, aged 35 to 70 years, from 628 urban and rural communities in 3 high-income countries (HIC), 7 upper-middle-income countries (UMIC), 3 lower-middle-income countries (LMIC), and 4 low-income countries (LIC), who were enrolled between January 2003 and December 2009. Main Outcome Measures Smoking status (current, former, never), level of exercise (low, <600 metabolic equivalent task [MET]-min/wk; moderate, 600-3000 MET-min/wk; high, >3000 MET-min/wk), and diet (classified by the Food Frequency Questionnaire and defined using the Alternative Healthy Eating Index). Results Among 7519 individuals with self-reported CHD (past event: median, 5.0 [interquartile range {IQR}, 2.0-10.0] years ago) or stroke (past event: median, 4.0 [IQR, 2.0-8.0] years ago), 18.5% (95% CI, 17.6%-19.4%) continued to smoke; only 35.1% (95% CI, 29.6%-41.0%) undertook high levels of work- or leisure-related physical activity, and 39.0% (95% CI, 30.0%-48.7%) had healthy diets; 14.3% (95% CI, 11.7%-17.3%) did not undertake any of the 3 healthy lifestyle behaviors and 4.3% (95% CI, 3.1%-5.8%) had all 3. Overall, 52.5% (95% CI, 50.7%-54.3%) quit smoking (by income country classification: 74.9% [95% CI, 71.1%-78.6%] in HIC; 56.5% [95% CI, 53.4%-58.6%] in UMIC; 42.6% [95% CI, 39.6%-45.6%] in LMIC; and 38.1% [95% CI, 33.1%-43.2%] in LIC). Levels of physical activity increased with increasing country income but this trend was not statistically significant. The lowest prevalence of eating healthy diets was in LIC (25.8%; 95% CI, 13.0%-44.8%) compared with LMIC (43.2%; 95% CI, 30.0%-57.4%), UMIC (45.1%, 95% CI, 30.9%-60.1%), and HIC (43.4%, 95% CI, 21.0%-68.7%). Conclusion and Relevance Among a sample of patients with a CHD or stroke event from countries with varying income levels, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors was low, with even lower levels in poorer countries.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  • Hossein Hajianfar · Zamzam Paknahad · Ahmad Bahonar
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Background: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in which antioxidant capacity changes. Omega‑3 fatty acids have extensive biological effects including their advantage on lipoprotein metabolism, platelet function, cytokine production, clotting, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of omega‑3 fatty acid supplements on antioxidant capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This clinical trial enrolled 71 women with type 2 diabetes in two case (treated with omega‑3 capsules) and control (treated with placebo) groups. In the first stage, participants filled out a demographics questionnaire including age, height, weight, waist circumference, and hip circumference.Their blood sample was taken to evaluate glycosylated hemoglobin and antioxidant capacity. Then the case group received intervention for 8 weeks and weight, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured and a blood sample was taken again. The data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software. Results: The mean difference of antioxidant capacity before and after intervention was significant (P < 0.001). Antioxidant capacity increased in the case group and reduced in the control group. Conclusions: With regard to the results of the present study, patients with type 2 diabetes increase their antioxidant capacity, enhance their antioxidant defense system, and probably prevent diabetes complications and related disease progress by taking omega‑3 supplements
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · International journal of preventive medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To compare one year clinical outcomes of patients with chronic stable angina who underwent implantation of bare metal stent (BMS) or drug eluting stent (DES). Methodology: Four hundred forty two (442) participants of OPCES study (Osvix versus Plavix in Cardiovascular Events after Stenting) were included in this sub-study. After evaluation of exclusion criteria (combined DES and BMS stenting (n=31) and incomplete data (n=48) patients were divided in two groups according to selected stent(DES or BMS). Follow-up was conducted by a structured telephone interview after 6 and 12 months. The patients' documents were reviewed by the Study Event Committee in the Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center to evaluate the occurrence of study endpoints which consisted of clinical success rate and major adverse cardiac events (Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE), cardiac death, non-fatal MI, target vessel revascularization and stroke) in hospital, after 6 and 12 months. Results: One hundred sixty six (45.7%) patients were in the DES and 197(54.3%) were in the BMS group. Procedural complications were seen more frequently in the DES group (1.0% vs. 4.8%, P=0.027), the prevalence of the in-hospital MACE, angiographic and clinical success rate were the same between both the groups. There was no significant difference regarding 6 and 12 months MACE rate in patients treated by BMS or DES (6 months: 1.1% vs. 0.6%, p>0.999 12 month: 3.4% vs 2.6%, P = 0.755). Conclusion: Considering the same clinical outcome and the economical parameters, use of the BMS after proper patient selection are recommended.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Background/objective: The study was carried out to assess the relationship between nut consumption and lipid profile among Iranian adults. Subject/methods: The study was based on data from the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program across three counties in central Iran in 2007. A cross-sectional survey of 9660 randomly selected adults aged ≥ 19 years were chosen based on sex, age and settlement distributions in each community. Nutritional behaviors were assessed by validated qualitative 48-item food frequency questionnaires, which covered regular intakes of four types of nuts: walnuts, almonds, pistachios and hazelnuts. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression tests were utilized to determine odds ratio (OR) 95% confidence interval of hyperlipidemia according to nut consumption patterns in unadjusted and three-adjusted models. Results: The results showed a significant link between high nut consumption and lower total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and apo B/apo A ratio (P<0.05) in female subjects and lower TG, LDL-C and apoB/apoA ratio in male subjects (P<0.05). The frequency of nut consumption was inversely associated with dyslipidemia, especially for those who had consumed nuts ≥ 4 times weekly (0.67 (0.57-0.79)). After adjusting for sex, age and other potential confounders, ORs increased enormously. Except for low apo A and high LDL-C, more frequent nut consumption (4 ≤ times per week) had a significant inverse effect on other dyslipidemia risk factors in all four models. Conclusions: We concluded that frequent consumption of nuts, particularly ≥ 4 times a week, may result in lower dyslipidemia occurrences and may exert cardioprotective effects.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · European journal of clinical nutrition
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    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2013
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the outcome of a comprehensive, community-based healthy lifestyle program on cardiometabolic risk factors. The Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) was a comprehensive action-oriented, multi-component intervention with a quasi-experimental design and reference area. METHODS: IHHP targeted the population-at-large (n = 2,180,000) in three districts in central Iran. Data from independent sample surveys before (2000 - 2001) and after (2007) this program were used to compare differences in the intervention area and reference area over time after controlling for age, education level and income. The samples in 2000 - 2001 and 2007 included 6175 and 4719 participants in intervention area, and 6339 and 4853 in reference area, respectively. Multiple interventional activities were performed based on the four main strategies of healthy nutrition, increased physical activity, tobacco control and coping with stress. RESULTS: The prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and high LDL-C decreased significantly in the intervention area versus the reference area in both sexes. However the reduction in overweight and obesity was significant only in females (P < 0.05 for all). There were no significant changes in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus. In the intervention area, the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia decreased from 23.5% to 12.5% among females without any changes in females in the reference area (p < 0.0001). In males, hypercholesterolemia decreased significantly in both intervention area (18.5% to 9.6%) and reference area (14.4% to 9.8%; p = 0.005). Mean triglyceride levels had a significant decrease in the intervention area and a non-significant decrease in the reference area (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: A comprehensive healthy lifestyle program comprising preventive and promotional activities that considers both population and high risk approaches can be effective in controlling cardiometabolic risk factors in a middle-income country.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013

Publication Stats

592 Citations
115.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008-2015
    • Isfahan University of Medical Sciences
      • Cardiovascular Research Center
      Isfahan, Ostān-e Eşfahān, Iran
  • 2005-2015
    • Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute
      Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran
  • 2013
    • Iran University of Medical Science
      Teheran, Tehrān, Iran
  • 2009-2012
    • University of Tehran
      • • Department of Food Hygiene and Quality Control
      • • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
      Teheran, Tehrān, Iran
    • University of Isfahan
      Isfahan, Ostān-e Eşfahān, Iran