Daniel H Kaplan

Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Maryland, United States

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Publications (46)503.2 Total impact

  • Jie Yang · Shaomin Hu · Luming Zhao · Daniel H Kaplan · Gary H Perdew · Na Xiong
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    ABSTRACT: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) 'preferentially' localize into barrier tissues, where they function in tissue protection but can also contribute to inflammatory diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the establishment of ILCs in barrier tissues are poorly understood. Here we found that under steady-state conditions, ILCs in skin-draining lymph nodes (sLNs) were continuously activated to acquire regulatory properties and high expression of the chemokine receptor CCR10 for localization into the skin. CCR10(+) ILCs promoted the homeostasis of skin-resident T cells and, reciprocally, their establishment in the skin required T cell-regulated homeostatic environments. CD207(+) dendritic cells expressing the transcription factor Foxn1 were required for the proper generation of CCR10(+) ILCs. These observations reveal mechanisms that underlie the specific programming and priming of skin-homing CCR10(+) ILCs in the sLNs.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Nature Immunology

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Immunity
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    ABSTRACT: Intranasal (i.n.) infections preferentially generate Th17 cells. We explored the basis for this anatomic preference by tracking polyclonal CD4(+) T cells specific for an MHC class II-bound peptide from the mucosal pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. S. pyogenes MHC class II-bound peptide-specific CD4(+) T cells were first activated in the cervical lymph nodes following i.n. inoculation and then differentiated into Th17 cells. S. pyogenes-induced Th17 formation depended on TGF-β1 from dendritic cells and IL-6 from a CD301b(+) dendritic cell subset located in the cervical lymph nodes but not the spleen. Thus, the tendency of i.n. infection to induce Th17 cells is related to cytokine production by specialized dendritic cells that drain this site.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Innate resistance to Candida albicans in mucosal tissues requires the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) by tissue-resident cells early during infection, but the mechanism of cytokine production has not been precisely defined. In the skin, we found that dermal γδ T cells were the dominant source of IL-17A during C. albicans infection and were required for pathogen resistance. Induction of IL-17A from dermal γδ T cells and resistance to C. albicans required IL-23 production from CD301b(+) dermal dendritic cells (dDCs). In addition, we found that sensory neurons were directly activated by C. albicans. Ablation of sensory neurons increased susceptibility to C. albicans infection, which could be rescued by exogenous addition of the neuropeptide CGRP. These data define a model in which nociceptive pathways in the skin drive production of IL-23 by CD301b(+) dDCs resulting in IL-17A production from γδ T cells and resistance to cutaneous candidiasis.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Immunity
  • Felix Scholz · Shruti Naik · Fayyaz S Sutterwala · Daniel H Kaplan
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    ABSTRACT: Recruitment of innate immune effector cells into sites of infection is a critical component of resistance to pathogen infection. Using a model of intradermal footpad injection of Candida albicans, we observed that inflammation as measured by footpad thickness and neutrophil recruitment occurred independent of adoptive immunity but was significantly reduced in MyD88(-/-) and IL-6(-/-) mice. Unexpectedly, huLangerin-DTA mice (ΔLC) that lack Langerhans cells (LC) developed increased skin inflammation and expressed higher amounts of IL-6, suggesting a suppressive role for LC. Increased inflammation also occurred in Rag1(-/-) ΔLC mice but was reversed by Ab-mediated ablation of NK cells. CXCR6(+)CD49a(+) NK cells are a liver-resident subset that can mediate inflammatory skin responses. We found that exaggerated skin inflammation was absent in ΔLC × CXCR6(-/-) mice. Moreover, the exaggerated response in ΔLC mice could be adoptively transferred with liver CD49a(+) NK cells. Finally, CD49a(+) NK cells in ΔLC but not control mice were recruited to the skin, and inhibition of their recruitment prevented the exaggerated response. Thus, in the absence of LC, CD49a(+) liver NK cells display an inappropriately proinflammatory phenotype that results in increased local skin inflammation. These data reveal a novel function for LC in the regulation of this recently described subset of skin tropic NK cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: The contribution of individual subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) to generation of adaptive immunity is central to understanding immune homeostasis and protective immune responses. We sought to define functions for steady-state skin DCs. We present an approach in which we restrict antigen presentation to individual DC subsets in the skin and monitor the effects on endogenous antigen-specific CD4(+) T- and B-cell responses. Presentation of foreign antigen by Langerhans cells (LC) in the absence of exogenous adjuvant led to a large expansion of T follicular helper (TFH) cells. This was accompanied by B-cell activation, germinal center formation, and protective antibody responses against influenza. The expansion of TFH cells and antibody responses could be elicited by both systemic and topical skin immunization. TFH cell induction was not restricted to LCs and occurred in response to antigen presentation by CD103(+) dermal DCs. CD103(+) DCs, despite inducing similar TFH responses as LCs, were less efficient in induction of germinal center B cells and humoral immune responses. We also found that skin DCs are sufficient to expand CXCR5(+) TFH cells through an IL-6- and IFN-α/β receptor-independent mechanism, but B cells were required for sustained Bcl-6(+) expression. These data demonstrate that a major unappreciated function of skin DCs is their promotion of TFH cells and humoral immune responses that potentially represent an efficient approach for vaccination. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Staphyloccus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Immunity
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    ABSTRACT: Highlights d C. albicans yeast, but not filamentous forms, are required for Th17 cell responses d Th17 cell induction requires LC-derived IL-6 and Dectin-1 ligation d Absent Dectin-1 ligation by pseudo-hyphae prevents Th17 cell induction by CD11b + dDCs d Th17 cells provide cutaneous protection and Th1 cells provide systemic protection In Brief Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus responsible for chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections. Kaplan and colleagues demonstrate in a skin infection model that yeast forms induce skin-protective Th17 cell responses by driving Langerhans cell expression of interleukin-6. Filamentous forms induce Th1 cell responses that provide protection from systemic infection. SUMMARY Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus responsible for chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections. Mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans requires T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation that is thought to depend on recognition of filamentous C. albicans. Systemic immunity is considered T cell independent. Using a murine skin infection model, we compared T helper cell responses to yeast and filamentous C. albicans. We found that only yeast induced Th17 cell responses through a mechanism that required Dectin-1-mediated expression of inter-leukin-6 (IL-6) by Langerhans cells. Filamentous forms induced Th1 without Th17 cell responses due to the absence of Dectin-1 ligation. Notably, Th17 cell responses provided protection against cuta-neous infection while Th1 cell responses provided protection against systemic infection. Thus, C. albicans morphology drives distinct T helper cell responses that provide tissue-specific protection. These findings provide insight into compartmentali-zation of Th cell responses and C. albicans patho-genesis and have critical implications for vaccine strategies.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Immunity
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    ABSTRACT: Bcl-3 is an atypical member of the IκB family. Bcl-3 functions as a cofactor of p50/NF-κB1 or p52/NF-κB2 homodimers in nuclei, where it modulates NF-κB-regulated transcription in a context-dependent way. Bcl-3 has tumorigenic potential, is critical in host defense of pathogens, and has been reported to ameliorate or exacerbate inflammation, depending on disease model. However, cell-specific functions of Bcl-3 remain largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of Bcl-3 in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) mouse model, which depends on the interplay between keratinocytes and immune cells. Bcl-3-deficient mice exhibited an exacerbated and prolonged CHS response to oxazolone. Increased inflammation correlated with higher production of chemokines CXCL2, CXCL9 and CXCL10, and consequently increased recruitment of neutrophils and CD8+ T cells. Bone marrow chimera experiments indicated that the ability of Bcl-3 to reduce the CHS response depended on Bcl-3 activity in radioresistant cells. Specific ablation of Bcl-3 in keratinocytes resulted in increased production of CXCL9 and CXCL10 and sustained recruitment of specifically CD8+ T cells. These findings identify Bcl-3 as a critical player during the later stage of the CHS reaction to limit inflammation via actions in radioresistant cells, including keratinocytes.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · European Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Candida albicans is the leading cause of systemic candidiasis, a fungal disease associated with high mortality and poor treatment options. The kidney is the target organ during infection and whose control is largely dependent on innate immunity, because lymphocytes appear redundant for protection. In this article, we show that this apparent redundancy stems from a failure of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells to migrate into infected kidneys. In contrast, Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells are recruited normally. Using Ag-loaded immunoliposomes to artificially reverse this defective migration, we show that recruited Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells polarize toward a Th17 phenotype in the kidney and are protective during fungal infection. Therefore, our data explain the redundancy of CD4(+) T cells for defense against systemic infection with C. albicans and have important implications for our understanding of antifungal immunity and the control of renal infections.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · The Journal of Immunology
  • Maria Hordinsky · Daniel H Kaplan

    No preview · Article · May 2014 · JAMA Dermatology
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    ABSTRACT: The C-type lectin receptor blood dendritic cell Ag 2 (BDCA2) is expressed exclusively on human plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and plays a role in Ag capture, internalization, and presentation to T cells. We used transgenic mice that express human BDCA2 and anti-BDCA2 mAbs to deliver Ags directly to BDCA2 on pDCs in vivo. Targeting Ag to pDCs in this manner resulted in significant suppression of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell and Ab responses upon secondary exposure to Ag in the presence of adjuvant. Suppression of Ab responses required both a decrease in effector CD4(+) T cells and preservation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Reduction in Treg numbers following Ag delivery to BDCA2 restored both CD4(+) T cell activation and Ab responses, demonstrating that Tregs were required for the observed tolerance. Our results demonstrate that Ag delivery to pDCs through BDCA2 is an effective method to induce immunological tolerance, which may be useful for treating autoimmune diseases or to inhibit unwanted Ab responses.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Barrier surfaces, such as the intestinal lining and the skin, are colonized by a diverse community of commensal microorganisms. Although commensal microorganisms clearly impact the host immune system, whether the immune system also shapes the commensal community is poorly understood. We used 16S rDNA deep sequencing to test whether mice with specific immune defects have an altered commensal microflora. Initially, skin swabs were obtained from wild-type and Langerhans Cell (LC) deficient mice. Despite the intimate contacts that LC make with the upper epidermis, no significant differences were observed in microbial community composition. Similarly, the skin of MyD88/TRIF(-/-), Rag1(-/-) and heterozygous littermate controls showed no alteration in their commensal communities. Next we examined mouth swabs and feces. We did not find a difference in the MyD88/TRIF(-/-) mice. However, we did observe a significant shift in the microbial composition in the feces and mouths of Rag1(-/-) mice. Thus, we conclude that the adaptive immune system modulates the microbial composition at mucosal surfaces in the steady-state but LC, adaptive immunity, and MyD88-dependent innate responses do not affect the skin microbiome revealing a major distinction between barrier sites.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Dendritic cells (DCs) in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) are composed of two CD103(+) subsets that differ in CD11b expression. We report here that Langerin is expressed by human LP DCs and that transgenic human langerin drives expression in CD103(+)CD11b(+) LP DCs in mice. This subset was ablated in huLangerin-DTA mice, resulting in reduced LP Th17 cells without affecting Th1 or T reg cells. Notably, cognate DC-T cell interactions were not required for Th17 development, as this response was intact in huLangerin-Cre I-Aβ(fl/fl) mice. In contrast, responses to intestinal infection or flagellin administration were unaffected by the absence of CD103(+)CD11b(+) DCs. huLangerin-DTA x BatF3(-/-) mice lacked both CD103(+) LP DC subsets, resulting in defective gut homing and fewer LP T reg cells. Despite these defects in LP DCs and resident T cells, we did not observe alterations of intestinal microbial communities. Thus, CD103(+) LP DC subsets control T cell homeostasis through both nonredundant and overlapping mechanisms.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Experimental Medicine
  • Daniel H Kaplan
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    ABSTRACT: Resistance to infection of the skin with Staphylococcus aureus depends on early production of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and IL-17A by skin-resident cells. However, several members of the IL-20 subfamily of cytokines (IL-19, IL-20 and IL-24) can inhibit the local generation of those two cytokines.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Nature Immunology
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    Botond Z Igyártó · Daniel H Kaplan
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    ABSTRACT: Langerhans cells and other skin-resident dendritic cells (DC) are required for the development of cutaneous adaptive immune responses. In vivo experiments using mice with selective DC-subset deficiencies and ex vivo experiments using isolated DC suggests that each subset makes a unique contribution to the adaptive response. This review focuses on the functional outcome of antigen presentation by Langerhans cells. Special attention is given to their ability to promote CD4 T cell differentiation in a variety of inflammatory contexts and whether this subset has the capacity to cross-prime CD8 T cells.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · Current opinion in immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs) are cytosolic receptors that initiate immune responses to sterile and infectious insults to the host. Studies demonstrated that Nlrp3 is critical for the control of Candida albicans infections and in the generation of antifungal Th17 responses. In this article, we show that the NLR family member Nlrp10 also plays a unique role in the control of disseminated C. albicans infection in vivo. Nlrp10-deficient mice had increased susceptibility to disseminated candidiasis, as indicated by decreased survival and increased fungal burdens. In contrast to Nlrp3, Nlrp10 deficiency did not affect innate proinflammatory cytokine production from macrophages and dendritic cells challenged with C. albicans. However, Nlrp10-deficient mice displayed a profound defect in Candida-specific Th1 and Th17 responses. These results demonstrate a novel role for Nlrp10 in the generation of adaptive immune responses to fungal infection.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Targeting of Ags directly to dendritic cells (DCs) through anti-DC receptor Ab fused to Ag proteins is a promising approach to vaccine development. However, not all Ags can be expressed as a rAb directly fused to a protein Ag. In this study, we show that noncovalent assembly of Ab-Ag complexes, mediated by interaction between dockerin and cohesin domains from cellulose-degrading bacteria, can greatly expand the range of Ags for this DC-targeting vaccine technology. rAbs with a dockerin domain fused to the rAb H chain C terminus are efficiently secreted by mammalian cells, and many Ags not secreted as rAb fusion proteins are readily expressed as cohesin directly fused to Ag either via secretion from mammalian cells or as soluble cytoplasmic Escherichia coli products. These form very stable and homogeneous complexes with rAb fused to dockerin. In vitro, these complexes can efficiently bind to human DC receptors followed by presentation to Ag-specific CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells. Low doses of the HA1 subunit of influenza hemagglutinin conjugated through this means to anti-Langerin rAbs elicited Flu HA1-specific Ab and T cell responses in mice. Thus, the noncovalent assembly of rAb and Ag through dockerin and cohesin interaction provides a useful modular strategy for development and testing of prototype vaccines for elicitation of Ag-specific T and B cell responses, particularly when direct rAb fusions to Ag cannot be expressed.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Langerhans cells (LCs) are skin-resident dendritic cells (DC) located in the epidermis that migrate to skin-draining lymph nodes during the steady state and in response to inflammatory stimuli. TGF-β1 is a critical immune regulator that is highly expressed by LCs. The ability to test the functional importance of LC-derived TGF-β1 is complicated by the requirement of TGF-β1 for LC development and by the absence of LCs in mice with an LC-specific ablation of TGF-β1 or its receptor. To overcome these problems, we have engineered transgenic huLangerin-CreER(T2) mice that allow for inducible LC-specific excision. Highly efficient and LC-specific expression was confirmed in mice bred onto a YFP Cre reporter strain. We next generated huLangerin-CreER(T2) × TGF-βRII(fl) and huLangerin-CreER(T2) × TGF-β1(fl) mice. Excision of the TGFβRII or TGFβ1 genes induced mass migration of LCs to the regional lymph node. Expression of costimulatory markers and inflammatory cytokines was unaffected, consistent with homeostatic migration. In addition, levels of p-SMAD2/3 were decreased in LCs from wild-type mice before inflammation-induced migration. We conclude that TGF-β1 acts directly on LCs in an autocrine/paracrine manner to inhibit steady-state and inflammation-induced migration. This is a readily targetable pathway with potential therapeutic implications for skin disease.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Langerhans cells (LC) are a subset of skin-resident dendritic cells (DC) that reside in the epidermis as immature DC, where they acquire Ag. A key step in the life cycle of LC is their activation into mature DC in response to various stimuli, including epicutaneous sensitization with hapten and skin infection with Candida albicans. Mature LC migrate to the skin-draining LN, where they present Ag to CD4 T cells and modulate the adaptive immune response. LC migration is thought to require the direct action of IL-1β and IL-18 on LC. In addition, TLR ligands are present in C. albicans, and hapten sensitization produces endogenous TLR ligands. Both could contribute to LC activation. We generated Langerin-Cre MyD88(fl) mice in which LC are insensitive to IL-1 family members and most TLR ligands. LC migration in the steady state, after hapten sensitization and postinfection with C. albicans, was unaffected. Contact hypersensitivity in Langerin-Cre MyD88(fl) mice was similarly unaffected. Interestingly, in response to C. albicans infection, these mice displayed reduced proliferation of Ag-specific CD4 T cells and defective Th17 subset differentiation. Surface expression of costimulatory molecules was intact on LC, but expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 was reduced. Thus, sensitivity to MyD88-dependent signals is not required for LC migration, but is required for the full activation and function of LC in the setting of fungal infection.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · The Journal of Immunology

Publication Stats

2k Citations
503.20 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • Pennsylvania State University
      University Park, Maryland, United States
  • 2008-2015
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States
    • University of Pittsburgh
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2004-2007
    • Yale University
      • Department of Laboratory Medicine
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States