Steffen Loft

University of Southern Denmark, Odense, South Denmark, Denmark

Are you Steffen Loft?

Claim your profile

Publications (433)1688.76 Total impact

  • L. -G. Hersoug · P. Møller · S. Loft
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The composition of the gut microbiota and excessive ingestion of high-fat diets (HFD) are considered to be important factors for development of obesity. In this review we describe a coherent mechanism of action for the development of obesity, which involves the composition of gut microbiota, HFD, low-grade inflammation, expression of fat translocase and scavenger receptor CD36, and the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI). SR-BI binds to both lipids and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria, which may promote incorporation of LPS in chylomicrons (CMs). These CMs are transported via lymph to the circulation, where LPS is transferred to other lipoproteins by translocases, preferentially to HDL. LPS increases the SR-BI binding, transcytosis of lipoproteins over the endothelial barrier,and endocytosis in adipocytes. Especially large size adipocytes with high metabolic activity absorb LPS-rich lipoproteins. In addition, macrophages in adipose tissue internalize LPS-lipoproteins. This may contribute to the polarization from M2 to M1 phenotype, which is a consequence of increased LPS delivery into the tissue during hypertrophy. In conclusion, evidence suggests that LPS is involved in the development of obesity as a direct targeting molecule for lipid delivery and storage in adipose tissue.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Obesity Reviews
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is generally associated with elevated risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Elderly and obese subjects may be particularly susceptible, although short-term effects are poorly described. Sixty healthy subjects (25 males, 35 females, age 55 to 83 years, body mass index > 25 kg/m2) were included in a cross-over study with 5 hours of exposure to particle- or sham-filtered air from a busy street using an exposure-chamber. The sham- versus particle-filtered air had average particle number concentrations of ~23.000 versus ~1800/cm3 and PM2.5 levels of 24 versus 3μg/m3, respectively. The PM contained similar fractions of elemental and black carbon (~20-25%) in both exposure scenarios. Reactive hyperemia and nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation in finger arteries and heart rate variability (HRV) measured within 1 h after exposure were primary outcomes. Potential explanatory mechanistic variables included markers of oxidative stress (ascorbate/dehydroascorbate, nitric oxide-production cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin and its oxidation product dihydrobiopterin) and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein and leukocyte differential counts). Nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation was reduced by 12% [95% confidence interval: −22%; −1.0%] following PM exposure, whereas hyperemia-induced vasodilation was reduced by 5% [95% confidence interval: −11.6%; 1.6%]. Moreover, HRV measurements showed that the high and low frequency domains were significantly decreased and increased, respectively. Redox and inflammatory status did not change significantly based on the above measures. This study indicates that exposure to real-life levels of PM from urban street air impairs the vasomotor function and HRV in overweight middle-aged and elderly adults, although this could not be explained by changes in inflammation, oxidative stress or nitric oxide-cofactors.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Particle and Fibre Toxicology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Type-2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Lifestyle factors, in particular obesity, diet, and physical activity play a significant role in the etiology of the disease. Of dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet has been studied, and generally a protective association has been identified. However, other regional diets are less explored. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and the risk of T2D. The index consists of six food items: fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples and pears, and root vegetables. Methods: Data was obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, at baseline, of whom 7366 developed T2D (median follow-up: 15.3 years). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association between the healthy Nordic food index and risk of T2D, adjusted for potential confounders. Results: Greater adherence to the healthy Nordic food index was significantly associated with lower risk of T2D after adjusting for potential confounders. An index score of 5-6 points (high adherence) was associated with a statistically significantly 25% lower T2D risk in women (HR: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.61-0.92) and 38% in men (HR: 0.62; 95%CI: 0.53-0.71) compared to those with an index score of 0 points (poor adherence). Conclusion: Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was found to be inversely associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that regional diets other than the Mediterranean may also be recommended for prevention of T2D.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Nutrients
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Please visit the conference homepage for the presentation: http://dce-conference.au.dk/fileadmin/dce-conference.au.dk/Presentations15/Busch_Hansen_Long_term_exposure_presented_in_aarhus_1st_October_2015.pdf
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2015
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although exposure to UV radiation is the major risk factor for skin cancer, theoretical models suggest that radon exposure can contribute to risk, and this is supported by ecological studies. We sought to confirm or refute an association between long-term exposure to residential radon and the risk for malignant melanoma (MM) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) using a prospective cohort design and long-term residential radon exposure. During 1993-1997, we recruited 57,053 Danish persons and collected baseline information. We traced and geocoded all residential addresses of the cohort members and calculated radon concentrations at each address lived in from 1 January 1971 until censor date. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and confidence intervals (CI) for the risk associated with radon exposure for NMSC and MM, and effect modification was assessed. Over a mean follow-up of 13.6 years of 51,445 subjects, there were 3,243 cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 317 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 329 cases of MM. The adjusted IRRs per 100 Bq/m3 increase in residential radon levels for BCC, SCC and MM were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.27), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.37) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.50), respectively. The association between radon exposure and BCC was stronger among those with higher socio-economic status and those living in apartments at enrollment. Long-term residential radon exposure may contribute to development of basal cell carcinoma of the skin. We cannot exclude confounding from sunlight and cannot conclude on causality, as the relationship was stronger amongst persons living in apartments and non-existent amongst those living in single detached homes.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Uptake of nanoparticles by endothelial cells is dependent on shear stress adaptation and flow exposure conditions. Adaptation of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to shear stress for 24 h was associated with reduced internalisation of unmodified 80 nm spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (mean hydrodynamic size of 99 nm in culture medium) after exposure in flow condition compared with cells that were cultured and exposed in static condition. In static condition, targeting of 80 nm AuNPs conjugated with antibodies against the intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (mean hydrodynamic size of 109 nm in culture medium) markedly increased the internalisation of AuNPs in HUVECs that were activated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF), a treatment that markedly increased the surface expression of ICAM-1. Shear stress-adapted and TNF-activated HUVECs, which were exposed in flow condition, had higher association with anti-ICAM-1 AuNPs than cells that were not TNF-activated or exposed to particles in static condition. Hence, shear stress adaptation reduces uptake of unmodified AuNPs and increases the association between anti-ICAM-1 AuNPs and TNF-activated HUVECs.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Nanoscale
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Engineered nanomaterials (NMs) offer great technological advantages but their risks to human health are still not fully understood. An increasing body of evidence suggests that some NMs are capable of distributing from the site of exposure to a number of secondary organs. The research into the toxicity posed by the NMs in these secondary organs is expanding due to the realisation that some materials may reach and accumulate in these target sites. The translocation to secondary organs includes, but is not limited to, the hepatic, central nervous, cardiovascular and renal systems. Current data indicates that pulmonary exposure is associated with low (inhalation route–0.00001–1% of total applied dose–24 h) translocation of virtually insoluble NMs such as iridium, carbon black, gold and polystyrene, while slightly higher translocation has been observed for NMs with either slow (e.g. silver, cerium dioxide and quantum dots) or fast (e.g. zinc oxide) solubility. The translocation of NMs following intratracheal, intranasal and pharyngeal aspiration is higher (up to 10% of administered dose), however the relevance of these routes for risk assessment is questionable. Uptake of the materials from the gastrointestinal tract seems to follow the same pattern as inhalation translocation, whereas the dermal uptake of NMs is generally reported to be low. The toxicological effects in secondary organs include oxidative stress, inflammation, cytotoxicity and dysfunction of cellular and physiological processes. For toxicological and risk evaluation, further information on the toxicokinetics and persistence of NMs is crucial. The overall aim of this review is to outline the data currently available in the literature on the biokinetics, accumulation, toxicity and eventual fate of NMs in order to assess the potential risks posed by NMs to secondary organs.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Critical Reviews in Toxicology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) may have adverse health effects. Central monitoring stations do not represent the personal exposure to UFP accurately. Few studies have previously focused on personal exposure to UFP. Sixty non-smoking residents living in Copenhagen, Denmark were asked to carry a backpack equipped with a portable monitor, continuously recording particle number concentrations (PN), in order to measure the real-time individual exposure over a period of ∼48 h. A GPS logger was carried along with the particle monitor and allowed us to estimate the contribution of UFP exposure occurring in various microenvironments (residence, during active and passive transport, other indoor and outdoor environments) to the total daily exposure. On average, the fractional contribution of each microenvironment to the daily integrated personal exposure roughly corresponded to the fractions of the day the subjects spent in each microenvironment. The home environment accounted for 50% of the daily personal exposure. Indoor environments other than home or vehicles contributed with ∼40%. The highest median UFP concentration was obtained during passive transport (vehicles). However, being in transit or outdoors contributed 5% or less to the daily exposure. Additionally, the subjects recorded in a diary the periods when they were at home. With this approach, 66% of the total daily exposure was attributable to the home environment. The subjects spent 28% more time at home according to the diary, compared to the GPS. These results may indicate limitations of using diaries, but also possible inaccuracy and miss-classification in the GPS data.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Atmospheric Environment
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Free palmitic acid (PA) is a potential pro-atherogenic stimulus that may aggravate particle-mediated cardiovascular health effects. We hypothesized that the presence of PA can aggravate oxidative stress and endothelial activation induced by multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) exposure in vitro. We investigated the interaction between direct exposure to MWCNTs and PA on THP-1 monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), as well as on indirect exposure in an alveolar-endothelial co-culture model with A549 cells and THP-1-derived macrophages exposed in inserts and the effect measured in the lower chamber on HUVECs and THP-1 cells. The exposure to MWCNTs, including a short (NM400) and long (NM402) type of entangled fibers, was associated with elevated levels of reactive oxygen species as well as a decrease in the intracellular glutathione concentration in HUVEC and A549 monocultures. Both effects were found to be independent of the presence of PA. MWCNT exposure significantly increased THP-1 monocyte adhesion to HUVECs, and co-exposure to PA aggravated the NM400-mediated adhesion but decreased the NM402-mediated adhesion. For the co-cultures, the exposure of A549 cells did not promote THP-1 adhesion to HUVECs in the lower chamber. When THP-1 macrophages were present on the cell culture inserts, there was a modest increase in the adhesion and an increase in interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 levels in the lower chamber whereas no tumor necrosis factor was detected. Overall, this study showed that direct exposure of HUVECs to MWCNTs was associated with oxidative stress and monocyte adhesion and the presence of PA increased the adhesion when exposed to NM400.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Nanotoxicology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It has been hypothesised that positive associations between age and levels of oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA may be related to an age-dependent decline in DNA repair activity. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between age and repair activity of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We isolated PBMCs from subjects aged 18-83 years, as part of a health survey of the Danish population that focussed on lifestyle factors. The level of DNA repair activity was measured as incisions on potassium bromate-damaged DNA by the comet assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P < 0.05) and plasma concentrations of glycosylated hemoglobin (P = 0.07). However, multivariate regression analysis only showed an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity (P < 0.05), indicating that the decline in repair activity was not mediated by metabolic risk factors. In summary, the results show an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity of oxidatively damaged DNA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Mutagenesis
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exposure to traffic-related particulate matter (PM) has been associated with increased risk of lung disease, cancer and cardiovascular disease especially in elderly and overweight subjects. The proposed mechanisms involve intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation and oxidation-induced DNA damage studied mainly in young normal-weight subjects. We performed a controlled cross-over, randomised, single-blinded, repeated-measure study where 60 healthy subjects (25 males and 35 females) with age 55-83 years and body mass index above 25kg/m(2) were exposed for 5h to either particle-filtered or sham-filtered air from a busy street with number of concentrations and PM2.5 levels of 1800/cm(3) versus 23 000/cm(3) and 3 µg/m(3) versus 24 µg/m(3), respectively. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected and assayed for production of ROS with and without ex vivo exposure to nanosized carbon black as well as expression of genes related to inflammation (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, interleukin-8 and tumour necrosis factor), oxidative stress response (heme oxygenase (decycling)-1) and DNA repair (oxoguanine DNA glycosylase). DNA strand breaks and oxidised purines were assayed by the alkaline comet assay. No statistically significant differences were found for any biomarker immediately after exposure to PM from urban street air although strand breaks and oxidised purines combined were significantly associated with the particle number concentration during exposure. In conclusion, 5h of controlled exposure to PM from urban traffic did not change the gene expression related to inflammation, oxidative stress or DNA repair, ROS production or oxidatively damaged DNA in PBMCs from elderly overweight human subjects. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Mutagenesis
  • Source

    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Single nanoparticle analysis: An interferometric optical approach calibrates sizes of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from the interference intensities by calibrating their interferometric signals against the corresponding transmission electron microscopy measurements. This method is used to investigate whether size affects the diffusion behavior of AuNPs conjugated to supported lipid bilayer membranes and to multiplex the simultaneous detection of three different AuNP labels. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Small
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Particulate air pollution increases risk of cancer and cardiopulmonary disease, partly through oxidative stress. Traffic-related noise increases risk of cardiovascular disease and may cause oxidative stress. In this controlled random sequence study, 18 healthy subjects were exposed for 3h to diesel exhaust (DE) at 276μg/m(3) from a passenger car or filtered air, with co-exposure to traffic noise at 48 or 75dB(A). Gene expression markers of inflammation, (interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor), oxidative stress (heme oxygenase (decycling-1)) and DNA repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1)) were unaltered in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). No significant differences in DNA damage levels, measured by the comet assay, were observed after DE exposure, whereas exposure to high noise levels was associated with significantly increased levels of hOGG1-sensitive sites in PBMCs. Urinary levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were unaltered. In auxiliary ex vivo experiments whole blood was incubated with particles from the exposure chamber for 3h without effects on DNA damage in PBMCs or intracellular reactive oxygen species production and expression of CD11b and CD62L adhesion molecules in leukocyte subtypes. 3-h exposure to DE caused no genotoxicity, oxidative stress or inflammation in PBMCs, whereas exposure to noise might cause oxidatively damaged DNA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which could be related to oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the associations between hepatic oxidative stress and vascular function in pressurized mesenteric arteries from lean and obese Zucker rats at 14, 24 and 37 weeks of age. Obese Zucker rats had more hepatic fat accumulation than their lean counterparts. Nevertheless, the obese rats had unaltered age-related level of hepatic oxidatively damaged DNA in terms of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) or human oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) sensitive sites as measured by the comet assay. There were decreasing levels of oxidatively damaged DNA with age in the liver of lean rats, which occurred concurrently with increased expression of Ogg1. The 37 week old lean rats also had higher expression level of Hmox1 and elevated levels of DNA strand breaks in the liver. Still, both strain of rats had increased protein level of HMOX-1 in the liver at 37 weeks. The external and lumen diameters of mesenteric arteries increased with age in obese Zucker rats with no change in media cross-sectional area, indicating outward re-modelling without hypertrophy of the vascular wall. There was increased maximal response to acetylcholine-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in both strains of rats. Collectively, the results indicate that obese Zucker rats only displayed a modest mesenteric vascular dysfunction, with no increase in hepatic oxidative stress-generated DNA damage despite substantial hepatic steatosis.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relevant in nanomedicine for drug delivery in the vascular system, where endothelial cells are first point of contact. We investigated the uptake of 80 nm AuNPs in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by flow cytometry, 3D confocal microscopy, nano-scale 3D-imaging using focused ion beam - scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and single particle inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (spICP-MS). HUVECs were cultured for 3 or 24 h in medium with AuNPs in a concentration range of 1.25 – 10 µg/ml. There was a concentration-dependent increase of AuNP inside cells measured by flow cytometry, spICP-MS and 3D confocal microscopy. The latter also showed that AuNPs were located in the cytosol. This was supported by FIB/SEM, showing that AuNPs were located in membrane enclosures in the cytoplasm as single particles or agglomerates of 2-3 or more particles. Pre-treatment with chlorpromazine inhibited the AuNP uptake in HUVECs, indicating that internalisation occurred mainly by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Cell activation by exposure to tumour necrosis factor or lipopolysaccharide had slight and no effect on the uptake of AuNPs, respectively. The AuNP exposure did not influence cell cytotoxicity, whereas the intracellular reactive oxygen species production was slightly increased. In conclusion, uptake of AuNPs by endothelial cells can be addressed quantitatively by several methods with high throughput and/or high specificity. Uptake of AuNPs in HUVECs occurred by mainly clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficking to membrane enclosures in the form of single and agglomerates of 2-3 particles.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Toxicology Research
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To explore associations of exposure to ambient and indoor air particulate and bio-aerosol pollutants with cardiovascular and respiratory disease markers, we utilized seven repeated measurements from 48 elderly subjects participating in a 4-week home air filtration study. Microvascular function (MVF), lung function, blood leukocyte counts, monocyte adhesion molecule expression, C-reactive protein, Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant protein-D (SPD) were examined in relation to exposure preceding each measurement. Exposure assessment included 48-h urban background monitoring of PM10, PM2.5 and particle number concentration (PNC), weekly measurements of PM2.5 in living- and bedroom, 24-h measurements of indoor PNC three times, and bio-aerosol components in settled dust on a 2-week basis. Statistically significant inverse associations included: MVF with outdoor PNC; granulocyte counts with PM2.5; CD31 expression with dust fungi; SPD with dust endotoxin. Significant positive associations included: MVF with dust bacteria; monocyte expression of CD11 with PM2.5 in the bedroom and dust bacteria and endotoxin, CD31 expression with dust serine protease; serum CC16 with dust NAGase. Multiple comparisons demand cautious interpretation of results, which suggest that outdoor PNC have adverse effects on MVF, and outdoor and indoor PM2.5 and bio-aerosols are associated with markers of inflammation and lung cell integrity.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · International journal of environmental research and public health
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins (ACNs) and phenolic acids (PA), which are hypothesized to protect against development of atherosclerosis. The present study examined the effect of an ACN- and PA-rich fractions, obtained from a wild blueberry powder, on the capacity to counteract lipid accumulation in macrophages derived from monocytic THP-1 cells. In addition, we tested the capacity of pure ACNs and their metabolites to alter lipid accumulation. THP-1-derived macrophages were incubated with fatty acids (500 μM oleic/palmitic acid, 2:1 ratio) and different concentrations (from 0.05 to 10 μg mL(-1)) of ACN- and PA-rich fractions, pure ACN standards (malvidin, delphinidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside), and metabolites (syringic, gallic and protocatechuic acids). Lipid accumulation was quantified with the fluorescent dye Nile red. Lipid accumulation was reduced at all concentrations of the ACN-rich fraction tested with a maximum reduction at 10 μg mL(-1) (-27.4 %; p < 0.0001). The PA-rich fraction significantly reduced the lipid accumulation only at the low concentrations from 0.05 µg mL(-1) to 0.3 µg mL(-1), with respect to the control with fatty acids. Supplementation with pure ACN compounds (malvidin and delphinidin-3-glucoside and its metabolic products (syringic and gallic acid)) reduced lipid accumulation especially at the low concentrations, while no significant effect was observed after cyanidin-3-glucoside and protocatechuic acid supplementation. The results demonstrated a potential role of both the ACN- and PA-rich fractions and single compounds in the lipid accumulation also at concentrations close to that achievable in vivo.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · European Journal of Nutrition

Publication Stats

16k Citations
1,688.76 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • University of Southern Denmark
      Odense, South Denmark, Denmark
  • 1998-2015
    • Copenhagen University Hospital
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1986-2015
    • IT University of Copenhagen
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2008-2014
    • National Research Centre for the Working Environment
      • Danish Nano Safety Centre
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2013
    • Maastricht University
      • Department of Toxicology
      Maastricht, Provincie Limburg, Netherlands
  • 2011
    • Herlev Hospital
      Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2000-2008
    • National Institute of Public Health, Denmark
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1999-2004
    • Aarhus University
      • Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine
      Aarhus, Central Jutland, Denmark
  • 2002
    • Danish Cancer Society
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1985-1998
    • Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte
      Hellebæk, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1995
    • Odense University Hospital
      Odense, South Denmark, Denmark
  • 1993
    • Lund University
      • Department of Surgery
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 1991
    • Rigshospitalet
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
    • Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre
      Hvidovre, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1989-1990
    • Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University
      København, Capital Region, Denmark