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Publications (5)20.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In a prospective longitudinal cohort study of dementia and mortality in persons with Down syndrome aged 45 years and older, 85 postmenopausal women were followed for a mean follow-up time of 4.3 years (range 0.0 to 7.4 years). The effect of age at menopause on age at diagnosis of dementia and survival was estimated using correlation analysis and Cox Proportional Hazard Model. We found a significant correlation between age at menopause and age at diagnosis of dementia (rho=0.52; p< 0.001), and between age at menopause and age at death (rho=0.49; p=0.01). Early age at menopause is associated with a 1.8 fold increased risk of dementia: Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.82 (95%Confidence Interval (CI): 1.31-2.52) and with risk of death: HR: 2.05 (95%CI: 1.33-3.16). Our study suggests that age at menopause in women with Down syndrome is a determinant of age at onset of dementia and mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD
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    ABSTRACT: In a prospective longitudinal cohort study of dementia and mortality in persons with Down syndrome aged 45 years and older, 85 postmenopausal women were followed for a mean follow-up time of 4.3 years (range 0.0 to 7.4 years). The effect of age at menopause on age at diagnosis of dementia and survival was estimated using correlation analysis and Cox Proportional Hazard Model. We found a significant correlation between age at menopause and age at diagnosis of dementia (rho=0.52; p< 0.001), and between age at menopause and age at death (rho=0.49; p=0.01). Early age at menopause is associated with a 1.8 fold increased risk of dementia: Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.82 (95%Confidence Interval (CI): 1.31-2.52) and with risk of death: HR: 2.05 (95%CI: 1.33-3.16). Our study suggests that age at menopause in women with Down syndrome is a determinant of age at onset of dementia and mortality.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2009 · Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD
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    ABSTRACT: The longer life expectancy now experienced by persons with Down syndrome (DS) makes it necessary to know the factors influencing survival in older persons with this syndrome. In a prospective longitudinal cohort study of dementia and mortality, 506 persons with DS aged 45 and older were followed for a mean of 4.5 years (range 0.0-7.6 years). Cognitive and social functioning were tested at baseline and annual follow-up. The diagnosis of dementia was determined according to a standardized protocol. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for survival analysis. Relative preservation of cognitive and functional ability is associated with better survival in this study population. Clinically, the most important disorders in persons with DS that are related to mortality are dementia, mobility restrictions, visual impairment, and epilepsy but not cardiovascular diseases. Also, level of intellectual disability and institutionalization are associated with mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2009 · Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is consistently associated with dementia in the general population. Findings on the role of this gene in persons with Down's syndrome (DS) are inconclusive. We studied the effects of APOE on mortality and dementia in a longitudinal prospective study of a large population-based sample of persons with DS (n=425), demented and non-demented. There was evidence that APOE epsilon4 is correlated with the rate of decline in the social competence rating scale (SRZ) (p=0.04). In our population, we found overall a modest but not statistical significant effect on the prevalence of dementia (OR=1.57, 95%CI: 0.87-2.82). We did observed a significant long-term effect on the incidence of dementia (HR=4.66, 95%CI: 1.35-16.14), but for those with a follow-up less than 3 years the risk was not significantly increased: HR=0.83 (95%CI 0.35-1.94). When pooling our data in a meta-analysis, the APOE epsilon4 allele shows a 1.59-fold (95%CI: 1.19-2.12) increase in risk of dementia in persons with DS. We conclude that APOE is influencing the risk of dementia in persons with DS.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2008 · Neurobiology of aging
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have documented that persons with Down's syndrome (DS) are at an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, at present it is still not clear whether or not all persons with DS will develop dementia as they reach old age. We studied 506 people with DS, aged 45 years and above. A standardized assessment of cognitive, functional and physical status was repeated annually. If deterioration occurred, the patients were examined and the differential diagnosis of dementia was made according to the revised Dutch consensus protocol and according to the ICD-10 Symptom Checklist for Mental Disorders. We compared our findings with those reported in the literature. The overall prevalence of dementia was 16.8%. Up to the age of 60, the prevalence of dementia doubled with each 5-year interval. Up to the age of 49, the prevalence is 8.9%, from 50 to 54, it is 17.7%, and from 55 to 59, it is 32.1%. In the age category of 60 and above, there is a small decrease in prevalence of dementia to 25.6%. The lack of increase after the age of 60 may be explained by the increased mortality among elderly demented DS patients (44.4%) in comparison with non-demented patients (10.7%) who we observed during a 3.3-year follow-up. There was no decrease in incidence of dementia in the age group of 60 and above. Our findings are very similar to those published in the literature. Patients with dementia were more frequently treated with antiepileptic, antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs. The history of depression was strongly associated with dementia. Our study is one of the largest population-based studies to date. We found that despite the exponential increase in prevalence with age, the prevalence of dementia in the oldest persons with DS was not higher than 25.6%.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2006 · Journal of Intellectual Disability Research