Fernanda Miori Pascon

University of Campinas, Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (47)44.11 Total impact


  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the tooth/noncarious cervical lesion restoration interface when using different adhesive systems and resin composites, submitted to thermal cycling (TC), using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) preparations (0.7 mm depth × 2 mm diameter) were performed on 60 human third molars and randomly divided into six groups, according to the adhesive system and resin composite used: group 1 = Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2) + Aelite LS Posterior (AP); group 2 = SB2 + Venus Diamond (VD); group = SB2 + Filtek Z250XT (Z250); group 4 = Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) + AP; group 5 = CSE + VD; group 6 = CSE + Z250. Selective enamel etching was performed for 30 seconds on groups 4, 5, and 6, while groups 1, 2, and 3 were etched for 30 seconds in enamel and 15 seconds in dentin. All groups were evaluated using OCT before and after TC (n=10). Images were analyzed using Image J software; enamel and dentin margins were separately evaluated. Data from OCT were submitted to PROC MIXED for repeated measurements and Tukey Kramer test (p≤0.05). No marginal gaps were observed in etched enamel, either before or after TC, for all adhesive and resin composite systems. A significant interaction was found between adhesive system and TC for the dentin groups; after TC, restorations with CSE showed smaller gaps at the dentin/restoration interface compared with SB2 for all resin composites. Increased gap percentages were noticed after TC compared with the gaps before TC for all groups. In conclusion, TC affected marginal integrity only in dentin margins, whereas etched enamel margins remained stable even after TC. Dentin margins restored with CSE adhesive system showed better marginal adaptation than those restored with SB2. Resin composites did not influence marginal integrity of NCCL restorations.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Operative Dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the structural and morphological differences between human and bovine primary root canals. Primary human maxillary central incisors (H) (n=9) and primary bovine incisors (B) (n=9) were selected. The roots were sectioned in the vestibular-lingual direction, planed and delimited in cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Tubule density (number of tubules per mm2) and diameter were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (1,000 and 5,000×) using Image J 1.47 software. Data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The highest tubule density was observed for B (28.527±1.717 mm2) compared with H (15.931±0.170 mm2) (p<0.01). Regarding root thirds, the cervical third presented a greater tubule density (26.417±11.654 mm2) than the apical third (17.999±5.873 mm2). The diameter of the dentin tubules was not different for cervical (3.50±0.08 µm), middle (3.45±0.30 µm) and apical thirds (3.42±0.33 µm) and substrate (H-3.29±0.14 µm; B-3.63±0.06 µm). It could be concluded that: (1) the radicular dentin structure of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds differ in terms of the tubule density; (2) the radicular dentin morphology of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds are similar in terms of the diameter of the dentin tubules.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Microscopy and Microanalysis
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child’s psychosocial development.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The integration of interdisciplinary dental and speech therapy can provide adequate treatment of dental and myofunctional alterations. In this case report, the dental treatment of three-year-old children with early childhood caries, premature loss of primary maxillary incisors due trauma, esthetic and functional rehabilitation and myofunctional therapy is presented. The dental care procedures included oral hygiene instructions, dietary recommendations and resin composite restorations of teeth 64, 84, 85, 74 and 75 (occlusal surface) and 51, 61, 52 and 62 (smooth surface) which were affected by dental caries. After one year of follow-up, teeth 51 and 61 were extracted (dental trauma history reported in first appointment), because the teeth presented extensive external reabsorption. Subsequently, esthetic and functional space maintainers were placed in the maxillary anterior region. Speech evaluation was performed using the MBGR protocol (orofacial myofunctional), in which the orofacial functions, mobility and muscular tone were analyzed. Scores were attributed to each item available in the protocol. Thus, the difficulty of lip and tongue movements were confirmed, in addition to reduced cheek tonus and alterations in speech. Myofunctional therapy was instituted for three months, once a week and this led to improvement in all aspects, with changes being confirmed by adequate scores obtained in application of the MBRG protocol. After dental treatment, clinical results satisfactory to both children and parents were observed. It was concluded that interdisciplinary approach involving dentistry and myofunctional therapy provided adequate treatment for oral conditions presented by children, providing oral health and favorable prognosis.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2015

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2014
  • A.S. Iwamoto · R.M. Puppin-Rontani · F.M. Pascon

    No preview · Article · Dec 2014
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effects of chemical agents on the physical properties and structure of primary pulp chamber dentin using surface roughness, microhardness tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty-five primary teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and were divided into five groups (n = 5): NT, no treatment; SH1, 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); SH1U, 1% NaOCl + Endo-PTC®; SH1E, 1% NaOCl + 17% EDTA; and E, 17% EDTA. After dentin treatment, the specimens were submitted to roughness, microhardness testing, and SEM analysis. Roughness and microhardness data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The SH1E group showed the highest roughness, followed by the E group (P < 0.05) when compared with the NT, SH1, and SH1U groups. Microhardness values of SH1 and SH1U showed no significant difference as compared to the NT (control) group (P > 0.05). Microhardness values could not be obtained in the EDTA groups (SH1E and E). The presence of intertubular dentin with opened dentin tubules was observed in the NT, SH1, and SH1U groups. SH1E showed eroded and disorganized dentin with few opened tubules and the intertubular/peritubular dentin was partially removed. Considering the physical and structural approaches and the chemical agents studied, it can be concluded that NaOCl and NaOCl associated with Endo-PTC® were the agents that promoted the smallest changes in surface roughness, microhardness, and structure of the pulp chamber dentin of primary teeth.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Microscopy Research and Technique
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) to root dentin of composite relined fiber glass posts cemented into the roots of extracted bovine teeth using different adhesive cementation protocols. Method: Eighteen roots of bovine teeth were used (n=6). Crowns were removed and roots were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks and sectioned, leaving the root portion with 20 mm. Dental root canals were prepared using burs system provided by fiber post manufacturer (WhitePost, FGM), allowing a uniform post space. Posts were silanated (Prosil, FGM) and the root canal was lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel to allow the fiber posts relined with composite resin (Z100, 3M ESPE). Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: etch-and rinse adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi Purpose, 3M ESPE) followed by RelyX ARC resin cement (3M ESPE) (SBMP+ARC); self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE) (RU2) and multi-mode adhesive (Scothbond Universal, 3M ESPE) followed by resin cement (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) (SBU+ULT). Roots were sectioned and evaluated at four depths (cervical to apical), by push-out test, which was performed in a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) until bond failure (0.5mm/min). Data were analyzed using a two-way split-plot ANOVA and Tukey test (p≤0.05). Result: Table 1. Means (SD) of PBS according to the group and depth (I=cervical;II=cervical/medium;III-medium/apical;IV-apical). Depth Group SBMP+ARC RU2 SBU+ULT I 5.8 (1.8)Aa 7.8 (1.8)Aa 6.5 (3.4)Aa II 4.1 (2.2)Aab 6.23 (1.7)Aab 7.1 (2.7)Aab III 3.9 (2.5)Abc 5.1 (1.2)Abc 5.7 (3.3)Abc IV 3.1 (1.7)Ac 4.1 (2.0)Ac 3.1 (1.8)Ac Means followed by different letters (upper case in the row and lower case in the columns) are significant different (p<0,05). Conclusion: No statistical differences were found in PBS for different adhesive cementation techniques of relining fiber glass posts to dentin roots. PBS decreased according to increasing depth of fiber glass posts for all cementing systems tested.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Mar 2014

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Dental Materials

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Dental Materials
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated structural and molecular issues of dentin caries-like lesions produced by different artificial models (ACL) compared with natural caries lesions (NCL). One hundred twenty-four sound occlusal dentin blocks and 47 carious blocks were obtained and surface hardness was analyzed (SH1). They were assigned to groups according to ACL: GB: Biological; GC: Chemical; GIS: In situ; GNC: natural caries (control). Blocks from groups 1, 2 and 3 were submitted to caries lesion induction. NCL and ACL blocks were submitted to surface hardness (SH 2), FT-Raman and µEDXRF analysis. All blocks were longitudinally sectioned and one of the halves was submitted to cross-sectional hardness (CSH) and the other to SEM analysis. SH1 and SH2 data were submitted to t test (unpaired and paired, respectively), CSH and SEM data to two-way and one-way ANOVA respectively, and Tukey and t tests, respectively (p<0.05). Data from FT-Raman/µEDXRF were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Dunnett multiple-comparisons test (a=0.05). GB and GNC showed lowest SH2 values that were significantly different from GC and GIS. Regarding CSH, GB and GNC showed no significant difference between them. SEM showed similar caries lesion depth for GB and GNC, being significantly higher than for GC and GIS. µEDXRF showed similar values of calcium and phosphate for GB and GNC; GNC values were significantly different from GIS. No significant difference was found among the groups concerning phosphate, carbonate and CH bonds values. For collagen type I, GC values were significantly different compared to other groups. It may be concluded that caries-like lesions produced by GB were the closest model to NCL.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Brazilian dental journal
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to verify the influence of NaOCl irrigation and water-storage time-WST on the degradation and microstructure of the resin-dentin interface bonded with different adhesive systems using Microtensile Bond Strength test-MTBS and scanning electron microscopy-SEM observations. In the present research, we used ninety sound third molars, divides into eighteen groups. The groups were set by adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2:SB, Clearfil Protect Bond:CP, Adper Prompt L-Pop:APL), with or without NaOCl irrigation,for simulate endodontic irrigation, and water-storage time (24 h, 45 d, 90 d). The adhesive procedure was performed at the middle dentin previously exposed. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05). The failure modes, presence or absence of resin tags, and the resin/dentin interface were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and data were analyzed with the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel Statistics (p < 0.05). The results show that there were no significant interactions between water-storage time, adhesive systems and irrigation. There were significant interactions between irrigation and the storage time, and irrigation and the adhesive system, but not between the adhesive system and the storage time. A significant decrease in MTBS values was noted in the non-NaOCl irrigation groups during WST evaluations. Compared with CP and SB, APL showed a decrease in MTBS values when NaOCl was used. After 90 days of storage, resin tags partially disappeared. Obtained results suggest that NaOCl irrigation did not affect the bond strength for up to 90 days, and when it was used with APL, there was a negative effect on bond strength, which was not found with CP and SB. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives
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    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effect of fluoride and non-fluoride sealants on hardness decrease (HD) and marginal adaptation (MA) on enamel substrates after cariogenic challenge. METHODS: Occlusal enamel blocks, from human third molars, were randomly divided into six groups (n=12), according to occlusal fissures condition (S - sound; C - caries-like lesion; CF - caries-like lesion+topical fluoride) and sealants (F - FluroShield; H - Helioseal Clear Chroma). Lesion depths were 79.3±33.9 and 61.3±23.9 for C and CF groups, respectively. Sealants were placed on occlusal surface and stored at 100% humidity (37°C; 24h/d). HD was measured by cross-sectional microhardness analysis at the sealant margin distances: -1 (under sealant), 0 (sealant margin), 1, 2 (outer sealant). Sealant MA was observed by polarized light microscopy and scored according to: 0 - failure (no sealant MA or total sealant loss); 1 - success (sealant MA present). MA and HD were analysed by ANOVA-R and mixed model analysis, respectively. RESULTS: For HD (ΔS), F values (6900.5±3686.6) were significantly lower than H values (8534.6±5375.3) regardless of enamel substrates and sealant margin distances. Significant differences were observed among sealant margin distances: -1 (5934.0±3282.6)<0 (8701.5±6175.7)=1 (8473.2±4299.4)=2 (7761.5±4035.1), regardless of sealant and substrate. MA was similar for all groups (p≥0.05). CONCLUSION: MA was not affected by sealant type or substrate condition, whereas enamel HD was favourably impacted by fluoride in the sealant. In addition, sealants were more effective as a physical barrier than as its chemical potency in reducing enamel HD. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Sealing with a fluoride material is a recommended procedure to prevent caries of occlusal permanent molars in high-caries-risk patients, even though those exhibiting white spot lesions, since the enamel hardness decrease when fluoride sealant was used in vitro.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Journal of dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the morphological and chemical changes in the pulp chamber dentin after using endodontic agents by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μEDXRF). Thirty teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and divided by six groups (n=5): NT-no treatment; CHX-2% chlorhexidine; CHXE-2% chlorhexidine+17% EDTA; E-17% EDTA; SH5-5.25% NaOCl; SH5E-5.25% NaOCl+17% EDTA. The inorganic and organic content was analyzed by FT-Raman. μEDXRF examined calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content as well as Ca/P ratio. Impressions of specimens were evaluated by SEM. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Differences were observed among groups for the 960 cm(-1) peak. Ca and P content differences were significant (SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE). CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The SEM images in the EDTA-treated groups had the highest number of open tubules. Erosion in the tubules was observed in CHX and SH5E groups. Endodontic agents change the inorganic and organic content of pulp chamber dentin. NaOCl used alone, or in association with EDTA, was the most effective agent considering chemical and morphological approaches.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of Biomedical Optics
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemical agents on the permeability and removal of the smear layer in the primary root dentin. Fifty roots were distributed into 6 groups: (1) 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (SH); (2) 5.25% SH+17% ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid (SHE); (3) 2% chlorhexidine (CHX); (4) 2% CHX+17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CHXE); (5) 17% EDTA (E); and (6) saline solution (SS). The canals were instrumented and irrigated. The roots were dyed, washed, and sectioned, and the permeability index was measured. The amount of smear layer was scored. Data were submitted to analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Student-Newman-Keuls and t tests (P<.05). Significant differences were observed in the cervical and apical thirds for the CHX (P=.03), CHXE (P=.027), SS (P=.038), and SH (P<.001) groups. The SS group showed a heavy smear layer in all thirds. Root canals treated with SHE showed great cleaning in the cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Sodium hypochlorite associated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid produces the best root canal cleaning and the highest permeability in all thirds.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effects of chemical agents, frequently used in endodontics, on the microhardness, surface roughness and structure of the primary pulp chamber dentin. Method: Twenty-five sound anterior primary teeth were selected. The crowns were sectioned longitudinally to expose the pulp chamber. The specimens were divided into 5 groups (n=5) according to the agents: NT–no treatment (control group), SH1-1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), SH1U-1% NaOCl+urea peroxide, SH1E-1% NaOCl+17% EDTA, E-17% EDTA, and submitted to microhardness (VHN) testing, surface roughness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p<.05). SEM images obtained were described qualitatively. Result: VHN values of SH1 (11.46) and SH1U (14.74) showed no significant difference compared to control group (NT) (16.16). VHN could not be measured in EDTA groups. SH1E (1.17) showed the highest values of roughness, followed by E (0.61). NT (0.25), SH1 (0.18) and SH1U (0.15) showed no differences among them (p>.05). Major alterations were observed for the SH1E and E with exposure of dentin tubules and reduction of intertubular dentin. Conclusion: It could be concluded that sodium hypochlorite used alone or associated with urea peroxide was a better agent than others considering mechanical and structural approaches to the primary pulp chamber primary dentin.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of different filling materials and cleaning agents on root dentin of primary teeth on the bond strength of a glass fiber post. Method: One hundred twenty roots of primary bovine teeth were selected and endodontically prepared. The roots were divided into four groups according to the filling materials (n=30): G1- Control (no material); G2- Calen® past + zinc oxide; G3- Vitapex® past; G4- Calcipex II® past. After 7 days, the filling materials were removed and the roots were subdivided according to the cleaning agents (n=10): SA- No cleaning (control); SB- 70% ethanol; SC- Tergenform®. Glass fiber posts were luted using dual polymerized resin cement RelyX ARC® after acid etching, rinsing and application of adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2®. After 7 days, samples were sectioned into 1-mm thick slabs and push-out test was performed in a universal machine. Result: Data obtained were submitted to two-way ANOVA (filling materials x cleaning agents) and Tukey test was applied for comparison between groups at 5% significance level. It was observed an interaction between the studied factors (p<0.001). The highest values were observed for the combinations: Calen®+OZ with 70% ethanol (12.21±2.73), followed by Vitapex® with Tergenform® (7.98±1.98), Control without cleaning (7.88±3.25), Calcipex II® with Tergenform® (7.46±2.29), Calcipex II® without cleaning (6.28±3.45), Vitapex® without cleaning (6.12±2.82), with no significant difference between groups. The lowest values were observed for group Control with Tergenform® (4.37±3.07). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the different filling materials and cleaning agents influenced the bond strength; when the Calen® past with zinc oxide was chose for root canal filling the best cleaning agent was 70% ethanol, while for the Vitapex® and Calcipex II® pastes, the best cleaning agent was Tergenform® or without cleaning.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2012