Rosalía Rodríguez

Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (90)409.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Proteins performing important biochemical activities in the olive tree (Olea europaea) pollen have been identified as allergens. One novel 37-kDa protein seems to be associated to the IgE-binding profile of a group of patients suffering allergy to peach and olive pollen. Three previously described olive pollen allergens exhibit very similar molecular mass. Our objective was to identify this allergen by using immunoproteomic approaches. After 2D-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, peptide sequences from several IgE-binding spots, allowed identifying this new allergen, as well as cloning and DNA sequencing of the corresponding gene. The allergen, named Ole e 12, is a polymorphic isoflavone reductase-like protein of 308 amino acids showing 80% and 74% identity with birch and pear allergens, Bet v 6 and Pyr c 5, respectively. A prevalence of 33% in the selected population is in contrast to 4%-10% in groups of subjects suffering from pollinosis. Recombinant allergen was produced in Escherichia coli, and deeply characterized. Immunoblotting and ELISA detection as well as inhibition experiments were performed with polyclonal antisera and allergic patients' sera. The recombinant allergen retains the IgE reactivity of its natural counterpart. Close structural and immunological relationships between members of this protein family were supported by their IgG recognition in vegetable species. In summary, Ole e 12 is a minor olive pollen allergen, which gains relevance in patients allergic to peach with olive pollinosis. Proteomic approaches used to analyse this allergen provide useful tools to identify hidden allergens, relevant for several allergic populations and thus complete allergenic panels.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of Amaranthaceae pollen allergy has increased due to the desertification occurring in many countries. In some regions of Spain, Salsola kali is the main cause of pollinosis, at almost the same level as olive and grass pollen. Sal k 1 - the sensitization marker of S. kali pollinosis - is used in clinical diagnosis, but is purified at a low yield from pollen. We aimed to produce a recombinant (r)Sal k 1 able to span the structural and immunological properties of the natural isoforms from pollen, and validate its potential use for diagnosis. Specific cDNA was amplified by PCR, cloned into the pET41b vector and used to transform BL21 (DE3) Escherichia coli cells. Immunoblotting, ELISA, basophil activation and skin-prick tests were used to validate the recombinant protein against Sal k 1 isolated from pollen. Sera and blood cells from S. kali pollen-sensitized patients and specific monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were used. rSal k 1 was produced in bacteria with a yield of 7.5 mg/l of cell culture. The protein was purified to homogeneity and structural and immunologically validated against the natural form. rSal k 1 exhibited a higher IgE cross-reactivity with plant-derived food extracts such as peanut, almond or tomato than with pollen sources such as Platanus acerifolia and Oleaceae members. rSal k 1 expressed in bacteria retains intact structural and immunological properties in comparison to the pollen-derived allergen. It spans the immunological properties of most of the isoforms found in pollen, and it might substitute natural Sal k 1 in clinical diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Endo-β-1,3-glucanases are widespread enzymes with glycosyl hydrolitic activity involved in carbohydrate remodelling during the germination and pollen tube growth. Although members of this protein family with allergenic activity have been reported, their effective contribution to allergy is little known. In this work, we identified Fra e 9 as a novel allergenic β-1,3-glucanase from ash pollen. We produced the catalytic and carbohydrate-binding domains as two independent recombinant proteins and characterized them from structural, biochemical and immunological point of view in comparison to their counterparts from olive pollen. We showed that despite having significant differences in biochemical activity Fra e 9 and Ole e 9 display similar IgE-binding capacity, suggesting that β-1,3-glucanases represent an heterogeneous family that could display intrinsic allergenic capacity. Specific cDNA encoding Fra e 9 was cloned and sequenced. The full-length cDNA encoded a polypeptide chain of 461 amino acids containing a signal peptide of 29 residues, leading to a mature protein of 47760.2 Da and a pI of 8.66. An N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding module are the components of this enzyme. Despite the phylogenetic proximity to the olive pollen β-1,3-glucanase, Ole e 9, there is only a 39% identity between both sequences. The N- and C-terminal domains have been produced as independent recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris, respectively. Although a low or null enzymatic activity has been associated to long β-1,3-glucanases, the recombinant N-terminal domain has 200-fold higher hydrolytic activity on laminarin than reported for Ole e 9. The C-terminal domain of Fra e 9, a cysteine-rich compact structure, is able to bind laminarin. Both molecules retain comparable IgE-binding capacity when assayed with allergic sera. In summary, the structural and functional comparison between these two closely phylogenetic related enzymes provides novel insights into the complexity of β-1,3-glucanases, representing a heterogeneous protein family with intrinsic allergenic capacity.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Ole e 9 and Fra e 9 are two allergenic β-1,3-glucanases from olive and ash tree pollens, respectively. Both proteins present a modular structure with a catalytic N-terminal domain and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at the C-terminus. Despite their significant sequence resemblance, they differ in some functional properties, such as their catalytic activity and the carbohydrate-binding ability. Here, we have studied the different capability of the recombinant C-terminal domain of both allergens to bind laminarin by NMR titrations, binding assays and ultracentrifugation. We show that rCtD-Ole e 9 has a higher affinity for laminarin than rCtD-Fra e 9. The complexes have different exchange regimes on the NMR time scale in agreement with the different affinity for laminarin observed in the biochemical experiments. Utilizing NMR chemical shift perturbation data, we show that only one side of the protein surface is affected by the interaction and that the binding site is located in the inter-helical region between α1 and α2, which is buttressed by aromatic side chains. The binding surface is larger in rCtD-Ole e 9 which may account for its higher affinity for laminarin relative to rCtD-Fra e 9. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
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    ABSTRACT: Olive (Olea europaea) pollen constitutes one of the most important allergen sources in the Mediterranean countries and some areas of the United States, South Africa, and Australia. Recently, we provided evidence that olive pollen releases nanovesicles of respirable size, named generically pollensomes, during in vitro germination. Olive pollensomes contain allergens, such as Ole e 1, Ole e 11, and Ole e 12, suggesting a possible role in allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of pollensomes to the allergic reaction. We show that pollensomes exhibit allergenic activity in terms of patients' IgE-binding capacity, human basophil activation, and positive skin reaction in sensitized patients. Furthermore, allergen-containing pollensomes have been isolated from three clinically relevant nonphylogenetically related species: birch (Betula verrucosa), pine (Pinus sylvestris), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Most interesting, pollensomes were isolated from aerobiological samples collected with an eight-stage cascade impactor collector, indicating that pollensomes secretion is a naturally occurring phenomenon. Our findings indicate that pollensomes may represent widespread vehicles for pollen allergens, with potential implications in the allergic reaction. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Mustard is a condiment added to a variety of foodstuffs and a frequent cause of food allergy. A new strategy for the detection of mustard allergen in food products is presented. The methodology is based on liquid chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Mustard allergen Sin a 1 was purified from yellow mustard seeds. Sin a 1 was detected with a total of five peptides showing a linear response (lowest LOD was 5ng). Sin a 1 was detected in mustard sauces and salty biscuit (19±3mg/kg) where mustard content is not specified. Sin a 1, used as an internal standard, allowed quantification of this mustard allergen in foods. A novel LC/MS/MS SRM-based method has been developed to detect and quantify the presence of mustard. This method could help to detect mustard allergen Sin a 1 in processed foods and protect mustard-allergic consumers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Food Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Background Act d 12 (11S globulin) and Act d 13 (2S albumin) are two novel relevant allergens from kiwi seeds that might be useful to improve the diagnostic sensitivity and the management of kiwifruit allergic patients.Objective: To perform a comprehensive structural and immunological characterization of purified Act d 12 and Act d 13 from kiwi seeds.Methods Sera from 55 well-defined kiwifruit allergic patients were used. Act d 12 and Act d 13 were purified by chromatographic procedures. Circular dichroism, mass spectrometry, concanavalinA detection, immunoblotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, basophil activation tests and IgE-inhibition experiments were used.ResultsAct d 12 and Act d 13 were purified from kiwi seeds to homogeneity by combining size-exclusion, ion-exchange and RP-HPLC chromatographies. Both purified allergens preserve the structural integrity and display typical features of their homologous counterparts from the 11S globulin and 2S albumin protein families, respectively. These allergens are released from kiwi seeds after oral and gastric digestion of whole kiwifruit, demonstrating their bioavailability after ingestion. The allergens retain the capacity to bind serum IgE from kiwifruit allergic patients, induce IgE cross-linking in effector circulating basophils and display in vitro IgE cross-reactivity with homologous counterparts from peanut and tree nuts.Conclusion Purified Act d 12 and Act d 13 from kiwi seeds are well-defined molecules involved in in vitro IgE cross-reactivity with peanut and tree nuts. Their inclusion in component-resolved diagnosis of kiwifruit allergy might well contribute to improve the diagnostic sensitivity and the management of kiwifruit allergic patients.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Allergy

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
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    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · Molecular Plant
  • Mayte Villalba · Rosalía Rodríguez · Eva Batanero
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    ABSTRACT: Olive tree is one of the main allergy sources in Mediterranean countries. The identification of the allergenic repertoire from olive pollen has been essential for the development of rational strategies of standardization, diagnosis, and immunotherapy, all of them focused to increase the life quality of the patients. From its complex allergogram, twelve allergens -Ole e 1 to Ole e 12- have been identified and characterized to date. Most of them have been cloned and produced as recombinant forms, whose availability have allowed analyzing their three-dimensional structures, mapping their T-cell and B-cell epitopes, and determining the precise allergenic profile of patients for a subsequent patient-tailored immunotherapy. Protein mutant, hypoallergenic derivatives, or recombinant fragments have been also useful experimental tools to analyze the immune recognition of allergens. To test these molecules before using them for clinic purposes, a mouse model of allergic sensitizations has been used. This model has been helpful for assaying different prophylactic approaches based on tolerance induction by intranasal administration of allergens or hypoallergens, used as free or integrated in different delivery systems, and their findings suggest a promising utilization as nasal vaccines. Exosomes -nanovesicles isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of tolerogenic mice- have shown immunomodulatory properties, being able to protect mice against sensitization to Ole e 1.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Methods
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    ABSTRACT: The study of cross-reactivity in allergy is key to both understanding. the allergic response of many patients and providing them with a rational treatment In the present study, protein microarrays and a co-sensitization graph approach were used in conjunction with an allergen microarray immunoassay. This enabled us to include a wide number of proteins and a large number of patients, and to study sensitization profiles among members of the LTP family. Fourteen LTPs from the most frequent plant food-induced allergies in the geographical area studied were printed into a microarray specifically designed for this research. 212 patients with fruit allergy and 117 food-tolerant pollen allergic subjects were recruited from seven regions of Spain with different pollen profiles, and their sera were tested with allergen microarray. This approach has proven itself to be a good tool to study cross-reactivity between members of LTP family, and could become a useful strategy to analyze other families of allergens.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Background The 11S globulin Sin a 2 is a marker to predict severity of symptoms in mustard allergic patients. The potential implication of Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity with tree nuts and peanut has not been investigated so far. In this work, we studied at the IgG and IgE level the involvement of the 11S globulin Sin a 2 in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut. Methods Eleven well-characterized mustard-allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2 were included in the study. A specific anti-Sin a 2 serum was obtained in rabbit. Skin prick tests (SPT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting and IgG or IgE-inhibition immunoblotting experiments using purified Sin a 2, Sin a 1, Sin a 3, mustard, almond, hazelnut, pistachio, walnut or peanut extracts were performed. Results The rabbit anti-Sin a 2 serum showed high affinity and specificity to Sin a 2, which allowed us to demonstrate that Sin a 2 shares IgG epitopes with allergenic 11S globulins from tree nuts (almond, hazelnut, pistachio and walnut) but not from peanut. All the patients included in the study had positive skin prick test to tree nuts and/or peanut and we subdivided them into two different groups according to their clinical symptoms after ingestion of such allergenic sources. We showed that 11S globulins contain conserved IgE epitopes involved in cross-reactivity among mustard, tree nuts and peanut as well as species-specific IgE epitopes. Conclusions The allergenic 11S globulin Sin a 2 from mustard is involved in cross-reactivity at the IgE level with tree nuts and peanut. Although the clinical relevance of the cross-reactive IgE epitopes present in 11S globulins needs to be investigated in further detail, our results contribute to improve the diagnosis and management of mustard allergic patients sensitized to Sin a 2.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Chenopodiaceae pollens such as those from Salsola kali and Chenopodium album are important causes of allergy in Mediterranean areas because of the progress of desertification in European countries. Among the different allergenic protein families, profilins constitute a group of panallergens involved in polysensitization and pollen-food allergy syndrome. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis of S. kali profilin highlights a polymorphic pattern with several isoforms showing different molecular (isoelectric point and molecular mass) and immunological features. Two isoforms have been cloned and sequenced. Sal k 4.02 and Sal k 4.03 displayed non-conservative amino acid changes in critical positions of the IgE epitopes. Both isoforms were produced in Escherichia coli and structurally and spectroscopically characterized. Changes in the electrophoretic mobility and in their IgG and IgE immunologic behavior have been observed in comparison to Che a 2, its counterpart from C. album. Sal k 4.03 possessed a similar IgE-binding ability than Che a 2, whereas Sal k 4.02 showed a 35% reduction in the IgE binding in 86% of patients suggesting a hypoallergenic character. The three-dimensional modeling allowed us proposing which amino acid residues are involved in those immunological changes based on the epitope mapping studies previously performed in other profilins. These profilin isoforms constitutes suitable candidates for specific immunotherapy with recombinant allergens. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · FEBS Journal
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    ABSTRACT: This work investigates the resistance to proteolysis and heating of the yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.) allergens Sin a 1 (2S albumin), Sin a 3 (nonspecific lipid transfer protein, LTP), and Sin a 4 (profilin) to explain their potential capability to induce primary sensitization at the gastrointestinal level. Sin a 1 and Sin a 3 resisted gastric digestion showing no reduction of the IgE reactivity. Intestinal digestion of Sin a 1 and Sin a 3 produced a limited proteolysis but retained significant IgE-binding reactivity. Sin a 1 was stable after heating, and although Sin a 3 was modified, most of its structure was recovered after cooling back. These two allergens would be therefore able to sensitize by ingestion. Sin a 4 was completely digested by gastric treatment and its conformational structure markedly modified at 85 °C. Thus, this allergen can be described as a nonsensitizing mustard allergen.
    No preview · Article · May 2012 · Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Recombinant DNA technology offers several approaches to convert allergens into hypoallergenic derivatives that can represent the basis of novel, safer and more effective forms of allergy vaccines. In this context, we used a new strategy for the design of a hypoallergenic derivative of Ole e 1, the main allergen of olive pollen. By screening a cDNA library from birch pollen, the clone BB18, encoding the birch counterpart of Ole e 1, was identified. In this study, BB18 has been produce in Pichia pastoris as a recombinant protein and immunologically characterized. The well-established non-allergenic properties of BB18 were used to generate a genetic variant of Ole e 1, named OB(55-58), by site-direct mutagenesis of four residues (E(55)V(56)G(57)Y(58)) in an IgE/IgG epitope of Ole e 1 by the corresponding ones in BB18 (SDSE). OB(55-58) was expressed in P. pastoris, purified to homogeneity and analyzed for IgE-reactivity by means of ELISA using sera from olive pollen allergic patients and rat basophil activation assay. T cell reactivity was assayed in a mouse model of Ole e 1 sensitization. The mutant OB(55-58) exhibited an impaired IgE reactivity, but not affected T cell reactivity, compared to wild type rOle e 1. This study emphasizes the usefulness of BB18 as a tool for epitope mapping and for engineering hypoallergenic derivatives of Ole e 1 as vaccine candidates for allergy prevention and treatment.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2012 · Molecular Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Cross-reactivity among plant food allergens belonging to the nonspecific lipid transfer protein (LTP) family is well known. In contrast, the relationship among these allergens and their putative homologs from olive (Ole e 7) and Parietaria (Par j 1) pollen has not been clarified. Sera with specific IgE to LTP allergens were obtained from peach-, mustard- and olive pollen-allergic patients. Purified LTP allergens from foods (peach, apple, mustard and wheat) and pollens (olive, mugwort and Parietaria) were tested by ELISA and ELISA-inhibition assays. Plant food LTP-allergic patients showed a significantly higher number of sera (89-100 vs. 33-64%) with specific IgE and mean specific IgE levels (0.30-1.56 vs. 0.21-0.34 OD units) to the 4 food LTP allergens tested than to olive Ole e 7 and Parietaria Par j 1 pollen. ELISA-inhibition assays indicated cross-inhibition between food LTP allergens but no cross-reactivity between these allergens and Ole e 7 and Par j 1, or, even more, between the LTP allergens from olive and Parietaria pollen. LTP allergens from olive and Parietaria pollen cross-react neither with allergenic LTPs from plant foods nor between themselves. Therefore, both pollens do not seem to be related with the LTP syndrome.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011 · International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Profilins are commonly involved in polysensitization of allergic patients; therefore, appropriate markers should be used in component-resolved diagnosis. To evaluate the immunological equivalence between profilins from pollens and plant-derived foods, to be used in component-resolved diagnosis. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against pollen and fruit profilins, as well as sera from patients allergic to mustard, melon, or olive pollen, were used. Purified profilins from mustard seeds, fruit melon, and chenopod and birch pollen were assayed in immunoblotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and ELISA inhibition assays. Significant correlation was found in the response of purified profilins by ELISA and immunoblotting for both specific IgG and IgE. The highest levels of IgE binding were obtained for olive pollen-allergic patients, which could be related to the route of sensitization. The responses of individual patients to profilins were also similar and independent of the sensitizing source. The inhibition between pairs of allergens was generally higher than 70%, indicating that profilins share most of the IgE epitopes. Modeling of mimotopes in the conformational structure of the implicated profilins supports their strong cross-reactivity obtained experimentally. No correlation exists between the level of IgE response of individual patients to specific profilins and the corresponding theoretical sensitizing source, suggesting that the sensitization could be attributable to any profilin present in the environment of the patients. This would bear out the use of most profilins as a common marker for polysensitization in component-resolved diagnosis and for therapeutic approaches.
    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2011 · The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
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    ABSTRACT: A considerable number of pollen-allergic patients develops allergy to plant foods, which has been attributed to cross-reactivity between food and pollen allergens. The aim of this study was to analyze the differences among pollen-allergic patients with and without plant food allergy. Eight hundred and six patients were recruited from 8 different hospitals. Each clinical research group included 100 patients (50 plant food-allergic patients and 50 pollen-allergic patients). Diagnosis of pollen allergy was based on typical case history of pollen allergy and positive skin prick tests. Diagnosis of plant-food allergy was based on clear history of plant-food allergy, skin prick tests and/or plant-food challenge tests. A panel of 28 purified allergens from pollens and/or plant foods was used to quantify specific IgE (ADVIA-Centaur® platform). Six hundred and sixty eight patients (83%) of the 806 evaluated had pollen allergy: 396 patients with pollen allergy alone and 272 patients with associated food and pollen allergies. A comparison of both groups showed a statistically significant increase in the food and pollen allergy subgroup in frequency of: (1) asthma (47 vs. 59%; p < 0.001); (2) positive skin test results to several pollens: Plantago, Platanus, Artemisia, Betula, Parietaria and Salsola (p < 0.001); (3) sensitization to purified allergens: Pru p 3, profilin, Pla a 1 - Pla a 2, Sal k 1, PR-10 proteins and Len c 1. Results showed relevant and significant differences between both groups of pollen-allergic patients depending on whether or not they suffered from plant-derived food allergy.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2010 · International Archives of Allergy and Immunology

Publication Stats

2k Citations
409.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1984-2015
    • Complutense University of Madrid
      • • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I
      • • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II
      • • Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Bioorganic
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2006
    • ALK-Abelló
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 1994
    • Fundación Jiménez Díaz
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain