Pauline Campa

Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (40)181.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of the trial was to evaluate in patients under ART the effect of rosuvastatin on cellular and soluble markers of immune activation/inflammation, as well as to identify patients who better benefit from statin administration. Methods: IMEA-043-CESAR was a Phase II open-label pilot trial that enrolled patients under suppressive ART and CD4 <500/mm. Patients received rosuvastatin (20mg/d) for 12 weeks 3 months. The primary outcome was the variation at week 12 (W12) in the proportion of CD38+HLA-DR+CD8+T lymphocytes. Secondary outcomes included evolution of other markers of T-cell activation and of inflammatory biomarkers between baseline, W12 and W24. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled; endpoints were available for 43 patients. When considering all patients, the proportion of CD38+HLA-DR+CD8+ T cells did not significantly decline throughout the follow-up. However, the proportion of CD38+CD8+T cells significantly decreased at W12 (median percentage change of -22.2% (-32.3;+1.4)). Principal component analysis allowed identification of 3 groups of patients based on their baseline activation/inflammation profiles, one group with elevated levels of CD8 T-cell activation, a small group with high levels of systemic inflammation and low levels of T-cell activation. Half of the patients exhibited relatively low levels of inflammation and activation. The proportion of activated CD8 T cells significantly decreased only in the particular group of patients with high baseline CD8 T-cell activation. Conclusion: This study shows that combining rosuvastatin with effective ART can result in a sustained decrease in CD8 T-cell activation and highlights the importance of identifying patients who can benefit from specific immunotherapeutic strategies.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
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    ABSTRACT: Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculous infection decrease the incidence of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic yield of two interferon-gamma release assays and tuberculin skin testing for the screening of Latent infection in HIV-infected patients. We performed a prospective study in 29 referral centers for HIV care in France. Asymptomatic, antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients who consented to participate underwent two commercial tests (T-SPOT.TB®, and QFT®), and skin test at enrollment, and were followed-up for clinical events during 24 months. Between March 2009 and 2011, 506 patients were included, of whom 415 performed the 3 tests. Median age was 38 years [interquartile range, 31-45], with median CD4 cells count of 466/mm3 [337-615], and HIV viral load of 4.5 log10 copies/mL [3.6-4.9]. At least one IGRA was positive for 55 (13.5%) patients: QFT® (n=43), T-SPOT.TB® (n=34), both (n=22). Skin test was positive (>5 mm) in 66 (15.9%) patients, with inter-tests agreement at 81-86%. On multivariate analysis, positive IGRA was only correlated with country of birth (8.4% for France vs 17.9% for high prevalence-countries, P=0.004). Of the 55 patients with positive IGRA, 8 (14.5%) developed active tuberculosis, all within 120 days. No other case of active tuberculosis was diagnosed. Once active tuberculosis was excluded, IGRA based latent infection prevalence was 11.8%. Systematic screening for latent tuberculosis infection by IGRA identifies a population at high risk of active tuberculosis over the next months. An extensive diagnostic work-up for active tuberculosis must follow positive IGRA, before considering treatment of latent infection. Clinical Trial registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00805272).
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Annals of the American Thoracic Society
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MRE) are widespread in the community, especially in tropical regions. Travelers are at risk of acquiring MRE in these regions, but the precise extent of the problem is not known. Methods. From February 2012 to April 2013, travelers attending 6 international vaccination centers in the Paris area prior to traveling to tropical regions were asked to provide a fecal sample before and after their trip. Those found to have acquired MRE were asked to send fecal samples 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after their return, or until MRE was no longer detected. The fecal relative abundance of MRE among all Enterobacteriaceae was determined in each carrier. Results. Among 824 participating travelers, 574 provided fecal samples before and after travel and were not MRE carriers before departure. Of these, 292 (50.9%) acquired an average of 1.8 MRE. Three travelers (0.5%) acquired carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The acquisition rate was higher in Asia (142/196 [72.4%]) than in sub-Saharan Africa (93/195 [47.7%]) or Latin America (57/183 [31.1%]). MRE acquisition was associated with the type of travel, diarrhea, and exposure to β-lactams during the travel. Three months after return, 4.7% of the travelers carried MRE. Carriage lasted longer in travelers returning from Asia and in travelers with a high relative abundance of MRE at return. Conclusions. MRE acquisition is very frequent among travelers to tropical regions. Travel to these regions should be considered a risk factor of MRE carriage during the first 3 months after return, but not beyond. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01526187. © 2015 The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: [email protected] /* */
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: to describe in a cohort of HIV-infected patients from Sub-Saharan origin, the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy after three years of combined antiretroviral therapy, and model the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases, while taking into account environmental factors. Design: Multinational, prospective cohort study. Setting: HIV outpatients' clinics from four tertiary care centers set in France and Cote d'Ivoire Participants: HIV-infected, treatment naive patients eligible to start antiretroviral treatment and from Sub-Saharan African origin. Main outcome measures: incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy, and assessment of 10 year-risk of cardio-vascular diseases using Framingham risk prediction, D.A.D. Cardiovascular Disease Risk and WHO/ISH prediction charts. Results: Of 245 patients followed up to 3 years, the incidences of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy were 5.5, 8.5 and 6.8 per 100 person-year of follow-up (cumulative incidence: 14.4, 21.9 and 18.1%, respectively). Living in France, as well as female gender and overweight, were risk factors for metabolic disorders as whole and only first generation protease inhibitors were marginally associated with metabolic syndrome. Cardiovascular risk as modeled through the 3 equations was high in all patients with the synergistic and deleterious effect of living in France compared to Cote d'Ivoire. Conclusions: this cohort study shows how the synergy between HIV, ARV exposure and westernization of life style in a cohort of HIV-infected patients from Sub-Saharan origin leads to a progressive increase in the risk of lipodystrophy, but also metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, all associated with increased cardio-vascular risk.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Dolutegravir has shown in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2). We report safety and efficacy data of regimens containing dolutegravir (50 mg twice daily) in antiretroviral-experienced, HIV-2-infected patients. Methods: HIV-2-infected patients experiencing virological failure to raltegravir received dolutegravir with optimized background antiretroviral combinations within the French Named Patient Program (NPP). Plasma HIV-2 RNA (pVL) was assessed at time of dolutegravir initiation (baseline), month 3, and month 6. Antiretroviral trough plasma concentrations (C12h) were determined using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Thirteen HIV-2-infected-patients, with a median duration of 15 years' infection and given 16 previous antiretroviral regimens, were included in NPP. Median follow-up was 9 months (min-max, 3-15 months). Median baseline pVL and CD4 cell count were 9544 copies/mL (inter quartile range [IQR], 3096-23 120 copies/mL) and 100 cells/µL (IQR, 77-171 cells/µL), respectively. Available integrase genotypic resistance patterns were Y143C/G/H/R (n = 5), Q148R/K (n = 2), and N155H (n = 4). Optimized background antiretroviral regimens conferring a genotypic sensitivity score ≤2 in 10 patients included nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors associated with darunavir/ritonavir (n = 12), saquinavir/ritonavir (n = 2), and maraviroc (n = 3). At months 3 and 6, pVL was undetectable in 6 of 13 and 4 of 12 patients, respectively, and median CD4 count was 161 (101-188) cells/µL and 167 (135-1353) cells/µL, respectively. Median dolutegravir C12h was 4086 (1756-5717 ng/mL) ng/mL in 9 patients. No serious events were notified except 1 death from progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy at month 4. Conclusions: Optimized dolutegravir-containing antiretroviral regimens supported by good plasma exposure provide a substantial initial efficacy rate for salvage therapy in heavily antiretroviral-experienced HIV-2-infected patients with virus harboring resistance to first-generation integrase inhibitors. Larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up are needed to confirm these findings.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Travel-related schistosomiasis can be detected in patients without symptoms of acute or chronic infection. A case of Schistosoma mekongi acquired in an endemic area of Laos and discovered unexpectedly from colon biopsies taken 5 years after infection is presented here. A literature review of previous cases of S. mekongi infection specifically associated with travelers is then presented.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Travel Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2014
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    ABSTRACT: In low hepatitis B virus (HBV)-prevalent countries, most HBV-infected persons are unaware of their status. We aimed to evaluate whether (i) previous HBV-testing, (ii) physicians decision to screen, and (iii) CDC's recommendations identified infected individuals and which risk-factor groups needing testing. During a mass, multi-center HBV-screening study from September 2010-August 2011, 3929 participants were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HBs and anti-Hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBcAb). Questions on HBV risk-factors and testing practices were asked to participants, while participants' eligibility for HBV-testing was asked to study medical professionals. 85 (2.2%) participants were HBsAg-positive, while 659 (16.8%) had either resolved HBV infection or isolated anti-HBcAb. When comparing practices, HBV-testing was more likely to occur in HBV-infected participants if Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations were used (Sensitivity = 100%, 95%CI: 95.8-100) than physicians' discretion (Sensitivity = 87.1%, 95%CI: 78.0-93.4) or previous HBV-test (Sensitivity = 36.5%, 95%CI: 26.3-47.6) (p<0.0001). Nevertheless, many non-infected individuals would still have been screened using CDC-recommendations (Specificity = 31.1%, 95%CI: 29.6-32.6). Using multivariable logistic regression, HBsAg-positive status was significantly associated with the following: males, originating from high HBV-endemic region, contact with HBV-infected individual, without national healthcare, and intravenous-drug user (IDU). Of these risk-factors, physician's discretion for testing HBV was not significantly associated with participants' geographical origin or IDU. Missed opportunities of HBV-screening are largely due to underestimating country of origin as a risk-factor. Applying CDC-recommendations could improve HBV-screening, but with the disadvantage of many tests. Further development of HBV-testing strategies is necessary, especially before severe disease occurs.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Each year, thousands of cases of uncomplicated malaria are imported into Europe by travellers. Atovaquone-proguanil (AP) has been one of the first-line regimens used in France for uncomplicated malaria for almost ten years. While AP's efficacy and tolerance were evaluated in several trials, its use in "real life" conditions has never been described. This study aimed to describe outcome and tolerance after AP treatment in a large cohort of travellers returning from endemic areas. Between September 2002 and January 2007, uncomplicated malaria treated in nine French travel clinics with AP were followed for 30 days after AP initiation. Clinical and biological data were collected at admission and during the follow-up. A total of 553 patients were included. Eighty-eight percent of them were born in Africa, and 61.8 % were infected in West Africa, whereas 0.5 % were infected in Asia. Migrants visiting friends and relatives (VFR) constituted 77.9 % of the patients, the remainder (32.1 %) were backpackers. Three-hundred and sixty-four patients (66 %) fulfilled follow-up at day 7 and 265 (48 %) completed the study at day 30. Three patients had treatment failure. One-hundred and seventy-seven adverse drug reactions (ADR) were reported during the follow-up; 115 (77 %) of them were digestive ADR. Backpackers were more likely to experiment digestive ADR compared to VFR (OR = 3.8; CI 95 % [1.8-8.2]). Twenty patients had to be switched to another regimen due to ADR. This study seems to be the largest in terms of number of imported uncomplicated malaria cases treated by AP. The high rate of reported digestive ADR is striking and should be taken into account in the follow-up of patients since it could affect their adherence to the treatment. Beside AP, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is now recommended as first-line regimen. A comparison of AP and ACT, in terms of efficacy and tolerance, would be useful.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Malaria Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Impairment of the intestinal barrier and subsequent microbial translocation (MT) may be involved in chronic immune activation, which plays a central role in HIV pathogenesis. Th17 cells are critical to prevent MT. The aim of the study was to investigate, in patients with primary HIV infection (PHI), the early relationship between the Th17/Treg ratio, monocyte activation and MT and their impact on the T-cell activation set point, which is known to predict disease progression. 27 patients with early PHI were included in a prospective longitudinal study and followed-up for 6 months. At baseline, the Th17/Treg ratio strongly negatively correlated with the proportion of activated CD8 T cells expressing CD38/HLA-DR or Ki-67. Also, the Th17/Treg ratio was negatively related to viral load and plasma levels of sCD14 and IL-1RA, two markers of monocyte activation. In untreated patients, the Th17/Treg ratio at baseline negatively correlated with CD8 T-cell activation at month 6 defining the T-cell activation set point (% HLA-DR(+)CD38(+) and %Ki-67(+)). Soluble CD14 and IL-1RA plasma levels also predicted the T-cell activation set point. Levels of I-FABP, a marker of mucosal damages, were similar to healthy controls at baseline but increased at month 6. No decrease in anti-endotoxin core antibody (EndoCAb) and no peptidoglycan were detected during PHI. In addition, 16S rDNA was only detected at low levels in 2 out 27 patients at baseline and in one additional patient at M6. Altogether, data support the hypothesis that T-cell and monocyte activation in PHI are not primarily driven by systemic MT but rather by viral replication. Moreover, the "innate immune set point" defined by the early levels of sCD14 and IL-1RA might be powerful early surrogate markers for disease progression and should be considered for use in clinical practice.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · PLoS Pathogens

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Journal of Hepatology
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    ABSTRACT: Background & aims: The systematic use of rapid tests performed at points-of-care may facilitate hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening and substantially increase HBV infection awareness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of such tests for HBsAg and anti-HBsAb detection among individuals visiting a variety of healthcare centers located in a low HBV-prevalent area. Methods: Three rapid tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) detection (VIKIA, Determine and Quick Profile) and one test for anti-hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBsAb) detection (Quick Profile) were evaluated in comparison to ELISA serology. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) and area under the ROC curve were used to estimate test performance. Non-inferiority criteria of the joint Se, Sp were set at 0.80, 0.95. Results: Among the 3956 subjects screened, 85 (2.1%) were HBsAg-positive and 2225 (56.5%) had a protective anti-HBsAb titer. Test Se and Sp (lower bound of 97.5% CI) were as follows: 96.5% (89.0%), 99.9% (99.8%) for Vikia; 93.6% (80.7%), 100.0% (99.8%) for Determine; and 90.5% (80.8%), 99.7% (99.5%) for Quick Profile; with all three tests achieving minimal non-inferiority criteria. False negatives were typically observed in inactive HBsAg carriers. The anti-HBsAb Quick Profile test had excellent specificity (97.8%) and PPV (97.8%) albeit low sensitivity (58.3%), thus failing to establish non-inferiority. Conclusions: All three HBsAg rapid tests could be considered ideal for HBV screening in low HBV-prevalent countries, given the ease of use, rapidity, and high classification probabilities. The anti-HBsAb Quick Profile could be considered reliable only for positive tests.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Journal of Hepatology

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Journal of Hepatology

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2012
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    ABSTRACT: In HIV-infected patients, data on immunogenicity of Yellow fever immunization are scarce, and there is conflicting evidence of the influence of CD4 T-cell count and plasma HIV RNA on neutralizing antibody titer (NT) after vaccine injection. In this prospective cohort study, NT was measured in all consecutive HIV outpatients who had previously received at least 1 injection of Yellow fever vaccine. Risk factors for vaccine failure (NT < 1:10) and magnitude of NT according to dates of HIV diagnosis and immunization were assessed by logistic regression and general linear models. Among 364 included patients, 24 (7%) had NT <1:10 after a mean delay of 8.4 years after immunization. Among patients immunized after HIV diagnosis (n = 240), NT <1:10 was associated only with detectable plasma HIV RNA at immunization. Among 79 patients with primary vaccination after diagnosis of HIV infection, higher HIV RNA at immunization was the unique independent risk factor for NT <1:10 [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.73 per log10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14 to 12.28]. Lower values of NT were independently associated with a shorter duration of undetectable plasma HIV RNA (OR = 1.05 per year, 95% CI: 1.005 to 1.09) and higher plasma HIV RNA (OR = 0.91 per log10, 95% CI: 0.84 to 0.99) at immunization. The key determinant of antibody response was the HIV replication status at immunization. No association was found between antibody response and CD4 T-cell count.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Persistent immune activation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of HIV disease. Besides natural regulatory T cells (nTregs), ‘double negative’ T cells shown to exhibit regulatory properties could be involved in the control of harmful immune activation. The aim of this study was to analyze, in patients with primary HIV infection (PHI), the relationship between CD4+CD25+CD127lowFoxP3+ nTregs or CD3+CD4−CD8− double negative T cells and systemic immune activation. Design: A prospective longitudinal study of patients with early PHI. Methods: Twenty-five patients were included. Relationships between frequency of Treg subsets and T-cell activation, assessed on fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells, were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Cytokine production by double negative T cells was assessed following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation. Results: No relationship was found between T-cell activation and frequencies of nTregs. In contrast, a strong negative relationship was found at baseline between the proportion of double negative T cells and the proportion of activated CD8 T cells coexpressing CD38 and HLA-DR (P = 0.005) or expressing Ki-67 (P = 0.002). In addition, the frequency of double negative T cells at baseline negatively correlated with the frequency of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+ T cells at month 6, defining the immune activation set point (P = 0.031). High proportions of stimulated double negative T cells were found to produce the immunosuppressive cytokines transforming growth factor-β1 and/or IL-10. Conclusion: The proportion of double negative T cells at baseline was found to be predictive of the immune activation set point. Our data strongly suggest that double negative T cells may control immune activation in PHI. This effect might be mediated through the production of TGF-β1/IL-10 known to downmodulate immune activation.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · AIDS
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    ABSTRACT: Most clinical guidelines recommend that AIDS-free, HIV-infected persons with CD4 cell counts below 0.350 × 10(9) cells/L initiate combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated remains a matter of debate. To identify the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated. Prospective observational data from the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and dynamic marginal structural models were used to compare cART initiation strategies for CD4 thresholds between 0.200 and 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L. HIV clinics in Europe and the Veterans Health Administration system in the United States. 20, 971 HIV-infected, therapy-naive persons with baseline CD4 cell counts at or above 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L and no previous AIDS-defining illnesses, of whom 8392 had a CD4 cell count that decreased into the range of 0.200 to 0.499 × 10(9) cells/L and were included in the analysis. Hazard ratios and survival proportions for all-cause mortality and a combined end point of AIDS-defining illness or death. Compared with initiating cART at the CD4 cell count threshold of 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L, the mortality hazard ratio was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84 to 1.22) for the 0.350 threshold and 1.20 (CI, 0.97 to 1.48) for the 0.200 threshold. The corresponding hazard ratios were 1.38 (CI, 1.23 to 1.56) and 1.90 (CI, 1.67 to 2.15), respectively, for the combined end point of AIDS-defining illness or death. Limitations: CD4 cell count at cART initiation was not randomized. Residual confounding may exist. Initiation of cART at a threshold CD4 count of 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L increases AIDS-free survival. However, mortality did not vary substantially with the use of CD4 thresholds between 0.300 and 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2011 · Annals of internal medicine
  • Jean-Louis Poirot · Pauline Campa

    No preview · Article · Apr 2011 · La Revue du praticien
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known in HIV-2 infection about the kinetics of disappearance of raltegravir (RAL)-resistant virus after RAL withdrawal. RAL was interrupted in four highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-2-infected patients exhibiting a virological failure when receiving RAL. Integrase gene was sequenced from plasma samples collected at the time of RAL failure and at further time points following RAL withdrawal. At the time of RAL withdrawal, virus exhibited different integrase resistance pathways: G140S/Q148R, E92Q/N155H, T97A/N155H and T97A/Y143C. In patient 1, the G140S/Q148R double-mutant was still detected at month (M)7 and at M11 after stopping RAL, but was no longer detected at M15. Regarding patient 2, the double-mutant E92Q/N155H was still present at M2 and M8 after stopping RAL, and was no longer detected at M12. In patient 3, RAL-resistant virus with T97A/N155H mutations were still present 1 month after stopping RAL, and were no longer detected at M14. Regarding patient 4, the mutant T97A/Y143C was still detected at M1 and M3 following RAL withdrawal. At M18 after RAL stop, integrase genotypic pattern evolved to T97A/Y143G. Persistence of HIV-2 RAL-resistant mutants was observed in all the key genetic RAL resistance pathways. These findings have clinical implications especially in HIV-2-infected patients for whom therapeutic arsenal is limited compared to HIV-1, since the persistence of resistant mutants might compromise the possible efficacy of upcoming second-generation integrase inhibitors.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2011 · Antiviral therapy
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    ABSTRACT: The emergence of non-AIDS-related events in the HIV-infected population experiencing a longer life expectancy implies the implementation of a comprehensive approach of HIV clinical management through better access to care, prevention, and early diagnosis of co-morbidities. The Orchestra program is a computer-assisted HIV care and support tool implemented since December 2004 in the outpatient clinic of a University Hospital set in Paris, France. The intervention aims at improving access to HIV information care and support specifically targeted five areas of actions: cardiovascular risk factors; gynecological follow-up; anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine coverage; sexuality and prevention of sexually transmitted infections; and compliance to antiretrovirals. The impact of this program was examined prospectively on a "before-after" basis after a two-year implementation. In the two-year period, 1717 patients were regularly followed. The level of the database information significantly increased in time (low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and glycemia were informed in 74% of patients at inclusion versus 95% at two years, and 83% versus 97%, p < 0.001, respectively). The number of targeted interventions was also higher. For eligible women, papanicolaou smears and mammography were prescribed in 52% of cases after intervention, versus 44% at inclusion, p0.04 and 83% versus 50%, p < 0.001, respectively. Indicators of care eventually improved significantly. Initially 72% non-adherent patients declared to be adherent after the intervention ( p < 0.001) and 67% of patients with initial LDL-hypercholesterolemia normalized their LDL level within two years ( p < 0.001). The Orchestra program has provided a unique opportunity to assess and improve prevention and management of co-morbidities in HIV patients.
    No preview · Article · May 2010 · AIDS Care

Publication Stats

804 Citations
181.33 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2014
    • Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris
      • Département de Médecine Interne
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • Université Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2
      Burdeos, Aquitaine, France
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002-2005
    • Hôpital Bichat - Claude-Bernard (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Nord Val de Seine)
      • Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France