Stefania Bandinelli

Azienda Sanitaria di Firenze, Florens, Tuscany, Italy

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Publications (340)2346.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: DNA methylation is influenced by diet and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and methylation modulates gene expression. Objective: We aimed to explore whether the gene-by-diet interactions on blood lipids act through DNA methylation. Design: We selected 7 SNPs on the basis of predicted relations in fatty acids, methylation, and lipids. We conducted a meta-analysis and a methylation and mediation analysis with the use of data from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) consortium and the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) consortium. Results: On the basis of the meta-analysis of 7 cohorts in the CHARGE consortium, higher plasma HDL cholesterol was associated with fewer C alleles at ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1) rs2246293 (β = -0.6 mg/dL, P = 0.015) and higher circulating eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (β = 3.87 mg/dL, P = 5.62 × 10(21)). The difference in HDL cholesterol associated with higher circulating EPA was dependent on genotypes at rs2246293, and it was greater for each additional C allele (β = 1.69 mg/dL, P = 0.006). In the GOLDN (Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network) study, higher ABCA1 promoter cg14019050 methylation was associated with more C alleles at rs2246293 (β = 8.84%, P = 3.51 × 10(18)) and lower circulating EPA (β = -1.46%, P = 0.009), and the mean difference in methylation of cg14019050 that was associated with higher EPA was smaller with each additional C allele of rs2246293 (β = -2.83%, P = 0.007). Higher ABCA1 cg14019050 methylation was correlated with lower ABCA1 expression (r = -0.61, P = 0.009) in the ENCODE consortium and lower plasma HDL cholesterol in the GOLDN study (r = -0.12, P = 0.0002). An additional mediation analysis was meta-analyzed across the GOLDN study, Cardiovascular Health Study, and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Compared with the model without the adjustment of cg14019050 methylation, the model with such adjustment provided smaller estimates of the mean plasma HDL cholesterol concentration in association with both the rs2246293 C allele and EPA and a smaller difference by rs2246293 genotypes in the EPA-associated HDL cholesterol. However, the differences between 2 nested models were NS (P > 0.05). Conclusion: We obtained little evidence that the gene-by-fatty acid interactions on blood lipids act through DNA methylation.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    Pierpaolo Palumbo · Luca Palmerini · Stefania Bandinelli · Lorenzo Chiari
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Falls are a common, serious threat to the health and self-confidence of the elderly. Assessment of fall risk is an important aspect of effective fall prevention programs. Objectives and methods: In order to test whether it is possible to outperform current prognostic tools for falls, we analyzed 1010 variables pertaining to mobility collected from 976 elderly subjects (InCHIANTI study). We trained and validated a data-driven model that issues probabilistic predictions about future falls. We benchmarked the model against other fall risk indicators: history of falls, gait speed, Short Physical Performance Battery (Guralnik et al. 1994), and the literature-based fall risk assessment tool FRAT-up (Cattelani et al. 2015). Parsimony in the number of variables included in a tool is often considered a proxy for ease of administration. We studied how constraints on the number of variables affect predictive accuracy. Results: The proposed model and FRAT-up both attained the same discriminative ability; the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for multiple falls was 0.71. They outperformed the other risk scores, which reported AUCs for multiple falls between 0.64 and 0.65. Thus, it appears that both data-driven and literature-based approaches are better at estimating fall risk than commonly used fall risk indicators. The accuracy-parsimony analysis revealed that tools with a small number of predictors (~1-5) were suboptimal. Increasing the number of variables improved the predictive accuracy, reaching a plateau at ~20-30, which we can consider as the best trade-off between accuracy and parsimony. Obtaining the values of these ~20-30 variables does not compromise usability, since they are usually available in comprehensive geriatric assessments.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis and cognitive impairment, which are highly prevalent conditions in elderly populations, share several risk factors. This study aims at evaluating the association of bone mineral density (BMD) with prevalent and incident cognitive impairment after a 3-year follow-up. We studied 655 community-dwelling women aged 65+ participating in the InCHIANTI study, who had been followed for 3 years. Total, trabecular, and cortical BMD were estimated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography using standard transverse scans at 4 and 38 % of the tibial length. Cognitive performance was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Trail Making Tests (TMT) A and B; a MMSE score <24 was adopted to define cognitive impairment. The TMT A-B score was calculated as the difference between TMT-A and TMT-B times (ΔTMT). The association of cognitive performance after 3 years with baseline indices of BMD was assessed by logistic and linear regression analyses. Cortical, but not trabecular, BMD was independently associated with incident cognitive impairment (OR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.88-0.98; P = 0.012), worsening cognitive performance (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.92-0.98; P = 0.039), and worsening performance in ΔTMT (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.92-0.99; P = 0.047). Increasing cortical BMD tertiles was associated with decreasing probability of incident cognitive impairment (P for linear trend =0.001), worsening cognitive performance (P = 0.013), and a worsening performance below the median value (P for linear trend <0.0001). In older women, low BMD might represent an independent and early marker of subsequent cognitive impairment. Physicians should assess and monitor cognitive performance in the routine management of elderly women with osteoporosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Calcified Tissue International
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Human Molecular Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Disease incidences increase with age, but the molecular characteristics of ageing that lead to increased disease susceptibility remain inadequately understood. Here we perform a whole-blood gene expression meta-analysis in 14,983 individuals of European ancestry (including replication) and identify 1,497 genes that are differentially expressed with chronological age. The age-associated genes do not harbor more age-associated CpG-methylation sites than other genes, but are instead enriched for the presence of potentially functional CpG-methylation sites in enhancer and insulator regions that associate with both chronological age and gene expression levels. We further used the gene expression profiles to calculate the 'transcriptomic age' of an individual, and show that differences between transcriptomic age and chronological age are associated with biological features linked to ageing, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, fasting glucose, and body mass index. The transcriptomic prediction model adds biological relevance and complements existing epigenetic prediction models, and can be used by others to calculate transcriptomic age in external cohorts.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Nature Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Resveratrol may play a protective role against the frailty syndrome (FS) because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Objective: We prospectively evaluated the association between habitual dietary resveratrol exposure and the development of FS after 3-, 6-, and 9-y follow-up periods in a community-dwelling older population. Design: We conducted a longitudinal analysis with the use of data from 769 participants aged ≥65 y from the Invecchiare in Chianti (Aging in Chianti) study. Total dietary resveratrol (TDR) intake was estimated at baseline with the use of a validated food-frequency questionnaire, which was developed to assess participants' usual food intakes over the previous year, and an ad hoc resveratrol database. Total urinary resveratrol (TUR) was analyzed with the use of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with a previous solid-phase extraction at baseline. The combination of both measures [total dietary resveratrol plus total urinary resveratrol (TDR+TUR)] was computed with the use of the Howe's method. FS was assessed at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-y of follow-up and was defined as the presence of ≥3 of the following 5 criteria: shrinking, exhaustion, sedentariness, slowness, and weakness. Results: TDR+TUR concentrations were inversely associated with FS risk over 3-y of follow-up (OR for comparison of extreme tertiles: 0.11; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.45; P-trend = 0.002) but not after 6- and 9-y of follow-up in multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for baseline frailty status and potential confounders. These results did not differ when analyses were further adjusted for inflammatory markers. Conclusion: Higher habitual dietary resveratrol exposure was associated with lower risk of older community dwellers developing FS during the first 3 y of follow-up but not after longer follow-up periods.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Lower muscle strength in midlife predicts disability and mortality in later life. Bloodborne factors, including growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), have been linked to muscle regeneration in animal models. We aimed to identify gene transcripts associated with muscle strength in adults. Methods: Meta-analysis of whole blood gene expression (overall 17,534 unique genes measured by microarray) and hand-grip strength in four independent cohorts (n=7,781, ages: 20-104 years, weighted mean=56), adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and leukocyte subtypes. Separate analyses were performed in subsets (older/younger than 60, male/female). Results: Expression levels of 221 genes were associated with strength after adjustment for cofactors and for multiple statistical testing, including ALAS2 (rate limiting enzyme in heme synthesis), PRF1 (perforin, a cytotoxic protein associated with inflammation), IGF1R and IGF2BP2 (both insulin like growth factor related). We identified statistical enrichment for hemoglobin biosynthesis, innate immune activation and the stress response. Ten genes were only associated in younger individuals, four in males only and one in females only. For example PIK3R2 (a negative regulator of PI3K/AKT growth pathway) was negatively associated with muscle strength in younger (<60 years) individuals but not older (>=60 years). We also show that 115 genes (52%) have not previously been linked to muscle in NCBI PubMed abstracts Conclusions: This first large-scale transcriptome study of muscle strength in human adults confirmed associations with known pathways and provides new evidence for over half of the genes identified. There may be age and sex specific gene expression signatures in blood for muscle strength.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Physiological Genomics
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    ABSTRACT: Patterns of DNA methylation (DNAm) that track with aging have been identified. However, the relevance of these patterns for aging outcomes remains unclear. Longitudinal epigenome-wide DNAm information was obtained from the InCHIANTI study, a large representative European population. DNAm was evaluated using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 array on blood samples collected at baseline and 9-year follow-up: observations from 499 participants with paired longitudinal blood sample and information on differential blood count were included in analyses. A total of 56,579 markers were significantly associated with age in cross-sectional analysis of DNAm at year 9, 31,252 markers were changed significantly over the 9-year follow-up, and 16,987 markers were both cross-sectionally associated with age and significantly changed over time. Rates of change at 76 markers and year 9 level of DNAm at 88 markers were identified as strongly associated with mortality in Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age and relevant covariates (mean follow-up time 4.4 years). Less than 0.05% of markers associated with age or that changed over time were also associated with mortality after adjusting for chronological age. Although the influence of DNAm on health and longevity remains unclear, these findings confirm that aging is associated cross-sectionally and longitudinally with robust and consistent patterns of methylation change.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcopenia is associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes in older people. Aim of the study was to explore the predictive value of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) diagnostic algorithm in terms of disability, hospitalization, and mortality and analyze the specific role of grip strength and walking speed as diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Longitudinal analysis of 538 participants enrolled in the InCHIANTI study. Sarcopenia was defined as having low muscle mass plus low grip strength or low gait speed (EWGSOP criteria). Muscle mass was assessed using bioimpedance analysis. Cox proportional and logistic regression models were used to assess risk of death, hospitalization, and disability for sarcopenic people and to investigate the individual contributions of grip strength and walking speed to the predictive value of the EWGSOP's algorithm. Prevalence of EWGSOP-defined sarcopenia at baseline was 10.2%. After adjusting for potential confounders, sarcopenia was associated with disability (odds ratio 3.15; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-7.05), hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR] 1.57; 95% CI 1.03-2.41), and mortality (HR 1.88; 95% CI 0.91-3.91). The association between an alternative sarcopenic phenotype, defined only by the presence of low muscle mass and low grip strength, and both disability and mortality were similar to the association with the phenotypes defined by low muscle mass and low walking speed or by the EWGSOP algorithm. The EWGSOP's phenotype is a good predictor of incident disability, hospitalization and death. Assessment of only muscle weakness, in addition to low muscle mass, provided similar predictive value as compared to the original algorithm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether weight loss in older adults may be a marker of impending burden of multimorbidity regardless of initial weight, testing the hypotheses that obesity but not overweight in elderly adults is associated with greater number of diseases than normal weight and that obese older adults who lose weight over time have the greatest burden of multimorbidity. Longitudinal cohort study (Invecchiare in Chianti Study). Community. Individuals aged 60 and older at baseline followed for an average of 4 years (N = 1,025). Multimorbidity was measured as number of diagnosed diseases. Baseline body mass index (BMI) was categorized as normal weight (<25.0 kg/m(2) ), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m(2) ), and obese (≥30.0 kg/m(2) ). Loss of weight was defined as decrease over time in BMI of at least 0.15 kg/m(2) per year. Age, sex, and education were covariates. Baseline obesity was cross-sectionally associated with high multimorbidity and greater longitudinal increase of multimorbidity than normal weight (P = .005) and overweight (P < .001). Moreover, obese participants who lost weight over follow-up had a significantly greater increase in multimorbidity than other participants, including obese participants who maintained or gained weight over time (P = .005). In nonobese participants, changes in weight had no effect on changes in multimorbidity over time. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that one specific disease did not drive the association and that competing mortality did not bias the association. Loss of weight in obese older persons is a strong biomarker of impending expansion of multimorbidity. Older obese individuals who lose weight should receive thoughtful medical attention. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
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    ABSTRACT: The hormone klotho, encoded by the gene klotho, is primarily expressed in the kidney and choroid plexus of the brain. Higher klotho concentrations and certain genetic variants of klotho have been linked to better cognition; however, it is unknown whether klotho relates prospectively to slower cognitive decline in older adults. Plasma klotho was measured in 833 participants aged 55 or older without dementia enrolled in InCHIANTI, a prospective cohort study comprising Italian adults. Cognition was measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Trail-Making Tests A and B (Trails A and Trails B) at enrollment and at 3 and 6 years after enrollment. We assessed whether klotho concentrations measured at the 3-year visit related to cognition and cognitive decline. Each additional natural logarithm of klotho (pg/mL) was associated with 35% lower risk of meaningful decline in MMSE, defined as decline exceeding three points (relative risk = 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.45, 0.95; p value = .02), and 0.75-point smaller average 3-year decline (baseline to 3-year visit) in MMSE (95% confidence interval 0.02, 1.48; p value = .04). No statistically significant associations were found between klotho and declining Trails A (relative risk = 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.75, 1.32; p value = .97) and B (relative risk = 1.02; 95% confidence interval 0.84, 1.24; p value = .82). Higher plasma klotho concentrations were associated with lower risk of meaningful decline and smaller average decline in MMSE. We did not observe such findings with Trails A and B, perhaps because they test executive function and motor skills, whereas MMSE measures global cognition. Future studies should investigate mechanisms through which klotho may affect domain-specific cognitive changes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: We examined whether physical activity in early adulthood, late midlife, and old age as well as cumulative physical activity history are associated with changes in physical functioning and mortality in old age. Data are from participants aged 65 years or older enrolled in the InCHIANTI study who were followed up from 1998-2000 to 2007-2008 (n = 1,149). At baseline, participants recalled their physical activity levels at ages 20-40, 40-60, and in the previous year, and they were categorized as physically inactive, moderately active, and physically active. Physical performance was assessed with the Short Physical Performance Battery and self-reported mobility disability was evaluated at the 3-, 6- and 9-year follow-up. Mortality follow-up was assessed until the end of 2010. Physical inactivity at baseline was associated with greater decline in Short Physical Performance Battery score (mean 9-year change: -2.72, 95% CI: -3.08, -2.35 vs -0.98, 95% -1.57, -0.39) and greater rate of incident mobility disability (hazard ratio 4.66, 95% CI 1.14-19.07) and mortality (hazard ratio 2.18, 95% CI 1.01-4.70) compared to physically active participants at baseline. Being physically active throughout adulthood was associated with smaller decline in physical performance as well as with lower risk of incident mobility disability and premature death compared with those who had been less active during their adult life. Higher cumulative physical activity over the life course was associated with less decline in physical performance and reduced rate of incident mobility disability and mortality in older ages. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The frailty phenotype (FP) proposed by Fried and colleagues (Fried LP, Tangen CM, Walston J, et al.; Cardiovascular Health Study Collaborative Research Group. Frailty in older adults: evidence for a phenotype. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001;56:M146-M156.) requires the administration of performance tests (gait speed, handgrip strength) not always feasible in routine clinical practice. Furthermore, the discriminative capacity of the instrument has been rarely investigated. Aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminative capacity of the FP and compare it with a modified version including only anamnestic information. Methods: Data are from 890 participants of the InCHIANTI study without impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) at baseline (mean age 74 years, women 55%). Frailty was defined by (a) the presence of ≥3 criteria of the FP, and (b) having ≥2 criteria of an anamnestic FP (AFP), not including gait speed and handgrip strength. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were used to evaluate the discriminative capacity of both definitions for incident disability (ie, loss of at least one ADL), incidence of "accelerated" disability (loss of >2 ADL) over a 6-year follow-up, and 5-years mortality. Results: FP and AFP yielded a frailty prevalence of 6.4% and 6.5%, respectively; only 32 patients were considered frail by both indices (kappa: .53). For incident disability, FP showed sensitivity = .194, specificity = .963, PPV = .400, and NPV = .903. Similarly, AFP had sensitivity = .129, specificity = .949, PPV = .245, and NPV = .894. Consistent results were found for accelerated disability and mortality. Conclusions: In our sample, both FP and AFP showed low sensitivity in identifying older people who would die or develop disability, but they could well discriminate people who would not experience adverse outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Background: In vitro evidence suggests anti-estrogenic properties for retinol and carotenoids, supporting a chemo-preventive role of these phytochemicals in estrogen-dependent cancers. During aging there are significant reductions in retinol and carotenoid concentrations, whereas estradiol levels decline during menopause and progressively increase from the age of 65. We aimed to investigate the hypothesis of a potential relationship between circulating levels of retinol, carotenoids, and estradiol (E2) in a cohort of late post-menopausal women. Methods: We examined 512 women ≥ 65 years from the InCHIANTI study. Retinol, α-caroten, β-caroten, β-criptoxantin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene levels were assayed at enrollment (1998-2000) by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography. Estradiol and testosterone (T) levels were assessed by Radioimmunometry (RIA) and testosterone-to-estradiol ratio (T/E2), as a proxy of aromatase activity, was also calculated. General linear models adjusted for age (Model 1) and further adjusted for other confounders including Body Mass Index (BMI) BMI, smoking, intake of energy, lipids, and vitamin A; C-Reactive Protein, insulin, total cholesterol, liver function, and testosterone (Model 2) were used to investigate the relationship between retinol, carotenoids, and E2 levels. To address the independent relationship between carotenoids and E2 levels, factors significantly associated with E2 in Model 2 were also included in a fully adjusted Model 3. Results: After adjustment for age, α-carotene (β ± SE = -0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.02) and β-carotene (β ± SE = -0.07 ± 0.02, p = 0.0007) were significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels. α-Carotene was also significantly and positively associated with T/E2 ratio (β ± SE = 0.07 ± 0.03, p = 0.01). After adjustment for other confounders (Model 2), the inverse relationship between α-carotene (β ± SE = -1.59 ± 0.61, p = 0.01), β-carotene (β ± SE = -0.29 ± 0.08, p = 0.0009), and E2 persisted whereas the relationship between α-carotene and T/E2 ratio was attenuated (β ± SE = 0.22 ± 0.12, p = 0.07). In a fully adjusted model (Model 3), only β-carotene (β ± SE = -0.05 ± 0.02, p = 0.03) was significantly and inversely associated with E2 levels independent of α-carotene. No association was found between retinol, total non-pro-vitamin A carotenoids, lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene, and E2 levels. Conclusions: In older women, β-carotene levels are independently and inversely associated with E2.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Nutrients
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies point out the role of the age-related decline of anabolic hormones, especially testosterone, in the onset of "anemia of aging". Some of testosterone erythropoietic activities are mediated by Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-1, which also seems to have independent erythropoietic effects. However, the association between IGF-1, anemia and hemoglobin (Hb) has been poorly investigated in older population. We used data from a representative sample of 953 subjects ≥65 yrs of the InCHIANTI Study, not on GH or erythropoietin therapy and without hematological malignancy and cancer. Anemia was defined according to the WHO criteria by Hb level ≤13 g/dL in men and ≤12 g/dL in women. Backward multiple regression analyses including age, IGF Binding Protein (IGFBP)-3, testosterone, comorbidities, inflammatory markers, anemia-related measures were used to address the relationship between IGF-1 and Hb and between IGF-1 and anemia in the two sexes. 46/410 men (11.2%) and 71/543 women (13.0%) were defined as anemic. After adjustment for age, anemic men (100±54 vs 130±56, p<0.001) and women (89.1±48 vs 110±52, p=0.001) exhibited lower IGF-1 levels than non-anemic counterpart. IGF-1 levels were independently and negatively associated with anemia in men (β±SE=-0.0005±0.0002, p=0.04) but not in women (β±SE=-0.0002±0.0002, p=0.40). In both men (β±SE=0.002±0.001, p=0.03) and women (β±SE=0.002± 0.0009, p=0.03) IGF-1 levels were independently and positively associated with Hb levels. In older men, but not in women, IGF-1 levels are negatively associated with anemia. IGF-1 levels are independent and positive determinants of Hb concentration in both sexes.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Endocrine Practice
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    Full-text · Dataset · May 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is highly heritable. Genetic variants showing robust associations with obesity traits have been identified through genome-wide association studies. We investigated whether a composite score representing healthy diet modifies associations of these variants with obesity traits. 32 BMI- and 14 waist-hip ratio (WHR)-associated SNPs were genotyped and genetic risk scores (GRS) calculated in 18 cohorts of European ancestry (n=68,317). Diet score was calculated based on self-reported intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes (unfavorable). Multi-variable adjusted, linear regression within each cohort, followed by inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to characterize: a) associations of each GRS with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR; b) diet score modification of genetic associations with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR. Nominally significant interactions (P=0.006-0.04) were observed between the diet score and WHR-GRS (but not BMI-GRS), two WHR loci (GRB14 rs10195252; LYPLAL1 rs4846567), and two BMI loci (LRRN6C rs10968576; MTIF3 rs4771122), for the respective BMI-adjusted WHR or BMI outcomes. Although the magnitudes of these select interactions were small, our data indicated that associations between genetic predisposition and obesity traits were stronger with a healthier diet. Our findings generate interesting hypotheses; however, experimental and functional studies are needed to determine their clinical relevance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Human Molecular Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Clonal proliferation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) is driven by somatic mutations in JAK2, CALR or MPL, but the contribution of inherited factors is poorly characterized. Using a three-stage genome-wide association study of 3,437 MPN cases and 10,083 controls, we identify two SNPs with genome-wide significance in JAK2V617F-negative MPN: rs12339666 (JAK2; meta-analysis P=1.27 × 10−10) and rs2201862 (MECOM; meta-analysis P=1.96 × 10−9). Two additional SNPs, rs2736100 (TERT) and rs9376092 (HBS1L/MYB), achieve genome-wide significance when including JAK2V617F-positive cases. rs9376092 has a stronger effect in JAK2V617F-negative cases with CALR and/or MPL mutations (Breslow–Day P=4.5 × 10−7), whereas in JAK2V617F-positive cases rs9376092 associates with essential thrombocythemia (ET) rather than polycythemia vera (allelic χ2 P=7.3 × 10−7). Reduced MYB expression, previously linked to development of an ET-like disease in model systems, associates with rs9376092 in normal myeloid cells. These findings demonstrate that multiple germline variants predispose to MPN and link constitutional differences in MYB expression to disease phenotype.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Nature Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Frailty, an age-related state of increased vulnerability, is associated with a higher risk of multiple adverse events. Studies have suggested that the quality of dietary intake may affect the development of frailty. We hypothesized that frailty in older subjects would be associated with dietary total polyphenols (DTP) intake and its biomarker, urinary total polyphenols (UTP). The Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) Study is a prospective cohort study set in the Chianti area (Italy). We used data at baseline from 811 participants aged 65 years and older. UTP was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay after solid-phase extraction. DTP was estimated using a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire and our own polyphenol database. The frailty, prefrailty, and nonfrailty states were defined according to the Fried and colleagues' criteria. Multinomial logistic regressions adjusted for potential confounders were used to assess the relationship between polyphenols and frailty. Both DTP and UTP concentrations progressively decrease from nonfrail to frail participants. Participants in the highest UTP tertile compared to those in the lowest tertile were significantly less likely to be both frail (odds ratio [OR] = 0.36 [0.14-0.88], p = .025) and prefrail (OR = 0.64 [0.42-0.98], p = .038). Exhaustion and slowness were the only individual frailty criteria significantly associated with UTP tertiles. No significant association was observed between frailty and DTP, after adjustment for covariates. High concentrations of UTP were associated with lower prevalence of frailty and prefrailty in an older community-dwelling population. A polyphenol-rich diet may protect against frailty in older persons. Our findings should be confirmed in longitudinal studies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Publication Stats

17k Citations
2,346.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2016
    • Azienda Sanitaria di Firenze
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
  • 2007-2014
    • University of Florence
      • Dipartimento di Chirurgia e Medicina Traslazionale (DCMT)
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
  • 2013
    • Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2012
    • McGill University
      • Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2010
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • University of Lausanne
      • Department of Medical Genetics
      Lausanne, VD, Switzerland
  • 2009
    • Case Western Reserve University
      • School of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2003-2009
    • National Research Council
      Oristany, Sardinia, Italy
  • 2003-2007
    • National Institute on Aging
      • • Clinical Research Branch (CRB)
      • • Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography and Biometry (LEDB)
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 1999-2006
    • INRCA Istituto Nazionale di Ricovero e Cura per Anziani
      Ancona, The Marches, Italy
  • 2005
    • University of Milan
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
    • INRIM Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy
    • University of Naples Federico II
      • Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology
      Napoli, Campania, Italy
  • 2004
    • University of Bologna
      • Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine DIMES
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy