T. Anahory

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montpellier, Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

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Publications (69)181.37 Total impact


  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Circulating nucleic acids (cell-free DNA and microRNAs) have for particularity to be easily detectable in the biological fluids of the body. Therefore, they constitute biomarkers of interest in female and male infertility care. Indeed, in female, they can be used to detect ovarian reserve disorders (polycystic ovary syndrome and low functional ovarian reserve) as well as to assess follicular microenvironment quality. Moreover, in men, their expression levels can vary in case of spermatogenesis abnormalities. Finally, circulating nucleic acids have also the ability to predict successfully the quality of in vitro embryo development. Their multiple contributions during assisted reproductive technology (ART) make of them biomarkers of interest, for the development of new diagnostic and/or prognostic tests, applied to our specialty. Circulating nucleic acids would so offer the possibility of personalized medical care for infertile couples in ART. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité
  • C. Brunet · M. Picandet · N. Molinari · T. Anahory · A. Gala · H. Dechaud

    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · Fertility and Sterility
  • C. Dechanet · C. Brunet · T. Anahory · S. Hamamah · B. Hedon · H. Dechaud
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    ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking is associated with lower fecundity rate, adverse reproductive outcomes and higher risk of IVF failure. Over the last decades, prevalence of smoking among women of reproductive age has increased. The aim of this work was to focus on the knowledge of the effects of cigarette smoking on all reproductive stages, from oocyte to embryo. For each reproductive functions human clinical and experimental studies were analysed in order to find hypothesis and explanations for effects observed. All reproductive functions are targets of smoke compounds and cigarette smoking impairs ovarian reserve, sexual steroids synthesis, Fallopian tubes functions and embryo development, leading to reduced fecundity. Some of smoke compounds were identified in ovarian tissue, in uterine fluid and in the embryo, suggesting direct toxicity.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2011 · Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité
  • C Dechanet · C Brunet · T Anahory · S Hamamah · B Hedon · H Dechaud
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    ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking is associated with lower fecundity rate, adverse reproductive outcomes and higher risk of IVF failure. Over the last decades, prevalence of smoking among women of reproductive age has increased. The aim of this work was first to focus on the knowledge of the effects of cigarette smoking on reproductive stages and particularly on implantation process and early placentation. Human clinical and experimental studies were analysed in order to find hypothesis and explanations for the effects observed. Then, our second aim was to analyse which factors could influence smoke effects. We observed that smoke compounds induce impairment of endometrial maturation, disturb angiogenesis and trophoblastic invasion. Cigarette compounds also impair uterine and endometrial vascularisation and myometrial relaxation. These effects lead to implantation failure in IVF and higher risk of miscarriage. Many factors influence the effects of cigarette smoke, as smoke behaviour, dose and duration of exposition. Sidestream is also damaging on reproductive function. Prenatal exposure leads to irreversible and deleterious effects on ovarian reserve. These observations need to be confirmed in order to improve health care in women of reproductive age.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité
  • C Dechanet · C Brunet · T Anahory · S Hamamah · B Hedon · H Dechaud
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    ABSTRACT: Cigarette smoking is associated with lower fecundity rate, adverse reproductive outcomes and higher risk of IVF failure. Over the last decades, prevalence of smoking among women of reproductive age has increased. The aim of this work was to focus on the knowledge of the effects of cigarette smoking on all reproductive stages, from oocyte to embryo. For each reproductive functions human clinical and experimental studies were analysed in order to find hypothesis and explanations for effects observed. All reproductive functions are targets of smoke compounds and cigarette smoking impairs ovarian reserve, sexual steroids synthesis, Fallopian tubes functions and embryo development, leading to reduced fecundity. Some of smoke compounds were identified in ovarian tissue, in uterine fluid and in the embryo, suggesting direct toxicity.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité
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    ABSTRACT: Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) describe structural rearrangements, essentially translocations, involving at least three breakpoints on two or more chromosomes. Although they are rare in humans, their clinical identification is important since CCR carriers can display various phenotypes which include phenotypically normal subjects, infertile males and patients with mental retardation and/or congenital abnormalities. The rearrangement can be de novo or familial. The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization assays and molecular techniques for the characterization of CCRs have indicated that the rearrangements could be more complex than initially assumed. Accumulating data have revealed that the mechanisms underlying the genesis of CCRs remain elusive. We performed a large PubMed search in order to summarize the current knowledge in this field and address important aspects of CCR formation and meiotic behavior, highlighting the complexity of these rearrangements at the chromosomal and genomic level. The review of published data indicates that the complexity of CCRs is becoming increasingly known, thanks to the application of more and more efficient molecular techniques. These approaches have allowed the precise sequence analysis of breakpoints and the identification of insertions, deletions, inversions and recombination events. New models have been proposed for the formation of CCRs, based on replication-based mechanisms and specific sequence elements. Their meiotic behavior has been discussed in the light of these new molecular data. Despite the increasing understanding of the mechanisms involved in their genesis, CCRs arise as unique, complex events for which the genetic and reproductive counseling of carriers remains a challenge.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Human Reproduction Update
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian response in female translocation carriers is not well understood. We aimed to evaluate the impact of chromosomal autosomal balanced translocations on the ovarian response to controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in female carriers undergoing IVF and PGD. In a retrospective study, we included all female translocation carriers who underwent PGD at our centre. We compared these patients to female patients from couples with male translocation carriers who underwent PGD. Results from 79 cycles of PGD from 33 female translocation carriers were compared with 116 cycles from 55 male translocation carriers. No difference was observed for patient characteristics: female age, anti-Müllerian hormone or antral follicle count. No difference in COS parameters was observed for the total dose of recombinant FSH, the number of retrieved oocytes and embryos on Day 3, for unaffected and transferred embryos. For the two groups, pregnancy rate was similar per cycle (12.7 versus 20.7%, P = 0.208). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female translocation carriers had a significantly higher estradiol level on the day of hCG administration (+540 pg/ml, P = 0.05). This paper is the largest to report ovarian response of female translocation carriers. This study showed that the ovarian response to COS was not impaired by balanced translocation status, suggesting that female chromosomal structural abnormalities did not influence the results of COS in PGD. Thus, female carriers of balanced translocations could be considered normal responders and standard doses of gonadotrophins used for ovarian stimulation.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2011 · Human Reproduction
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Metabolomics was recently introduced in human IVF for non-invasive identification of viable embryos with the highest developmental competence. The aim of the present preliminary study was to determine whether embryo selection using non-invasive metabolomic profiling as an adjunct to morphology leads to increased pregnancy and implantation rates compared to routine morphological embryo evaluation alone. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted from April to December 2010, at Eugonia Unit of Assisted Reproduction in Athens on 125 IVF patients with at least 4 fertilized oocytes (2PN). Patients underwent ovarian stimulation using GnRH agonist or antagonist protocols and oocyte retrieval was performed 36 hours after administration of hCG. Oocytes were fertilized by IVF or ICSI and fertilization was assessed 16–20 hours post insemination. Embryos were individually cultured in 25 μl drops of sequential culture media (ISM1/BlastAssist;Origio,Denmark). Embryo transfer was performed 2, 3, or 5 days after oocyte retrieval, depending on patient history and embryo characteristics. In the metabolomics group, 3–8 embryos of good morphology from each patient’s cohort were metabolically evaluated using Viametrics-E (Molecular Biometrics, USA) and ranked on the day of embryo transfer. 10μl of media samples of each corresponding embryo were loaded onto specialized spectrometer-compatible sample cells and measured using a near-infrared spectrometer. Analysis of each sample and corresponding control media was performed to provide the Viability Score. The Viability Score represents an assessment of specific biomarkers, corresponding to unique functional groups of molecules, and is generated using specific algorithms for Day 2, 3 and 5 transfers. The resulting viability score is a quantitative measurement of an embryo’s potential to establish a pregnancy with fetal cardiac activity (FCA). Patients were allocated (ratio ViaMetrics-E:routine morphology = 1:2) to embryo selection based either on the viability score combined with embryo morphology (n = 39, metabolomics group) or embryo morphology only (n = 86, control group). One to four embryos with the highest viability score were selected for transfer, depending on embryo quality and patient age. Categorical and continuous data were analyzed for statistical significance using 2-tailed Fisher’s exact test and unpaired t -test respectively. Results: Mean (± SD) patient age (years) (34.5 ± 4.7 vs 35.7 ± 4.4), BMI (kg/m2) (25.1 ± 5.1 vs 25.3 ± 4.2), years of infertility (3.5 ± 2.1 vs 4.0 ± 3.6), number of previous IVF attempts (1.2 ± 1.6 vs 1.5 ± 1.9), basal FSH (mIU/ml) (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 8.2 ± 2.7), number of oocytes retrieved (17.2 ± 7.3 vs 15.1 ± 6.0), number of fertilized oocytes (9.9 ± 4.0 vs 8.4 ± 4.1) and number of embryos transferred (2.6 ± 0.7 vs 2.9 ± 0.6) per patient were similar in the Viametrics-E metabolomics and control group respectively. Biochemical pregnancy rates [28/39 (71.8%) vs 57/86 (66.3%)], and clinical pregnancy rates [21/39 (53.9%) vs 41/86 (47.7%)] were improved between the metabolomics and control groups but did not differ significantly. A total of 359 embryos were transferred (metabolomics: n = 102 embryos; control: n = 257 embryos). Implantation rates (37.3% vs 25.7%; p = 0.04) and implantations with FCA (32.4% vs 21.4%; p = 0.04) were significantly higher in the metabolomics group compared to controls. In the metabolomics group, a total of 196 embryos were analyzed and 102 embryos were transferred. The mean viability score of embryos selected for transfer (0.6 ± 0.2) was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) compared to embryos not selected for transfer (0.3 ± 0.2). Conclusion: The present preliminary trial indicates increased implantation rates with positive FCA following embryo selection based on non-invasive metabolomic analysis. The method may provide an objective secondary level of assessment as an adjunct to embryo morphology by ranking the embryos of a patient’s cohort. However, following the voluntary market withdrawal/recall of ViaMetrics-E in December 2010, the results presented here should be viewed with caution. At the time of writing, an upgraded version is awaited, which will require further stringent assessment and validation, in a single embryo transfer setting.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011 · Human Reproduction
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND Cigarette smoking is associated with lower fecundity rates, adverse reproductive outcomes and a higher risk of IVF failures. Over the last few decades, prevalence of smoking among women of reproductive age has increased. This review focuses on current knowledge of the potential effects of smoke toxicants on all reproductive stages and the consequences of smoke exposure on reproductive functions. METHODS We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature on the impact of cigarette smoking and smoke constituents on the different stages of reproductive function, including epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies. We attempted to create hypotheses and find explanations for the deleterious effects of cigarette smoke observed in experimental studies. RESULTS Cigarette smoke contains several thousand components (e.g. nicotine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cadmium) with diverse effects. Each stage of reproductive function, folliculogenesis, steroidogenesis, embryo transport, endometrial receptivity, endometrial angiogenesis, uterine blood flow and uterine myometrium is a target for cigarette smoke components. The effects of cigarette smoke are dose-dependent and are influenced by the presence of other toxic substances and hormonal status. Individual sensitivity, dose, time and type of exposure also play a role in the impact of smoke constituents on human fertility. CONCLUSIONS All stages of reproductive functions are targets of cigarette smoke toxicants. Further studies are necessary to better understand the deleterious effects of cigarette smoke compounds on the reproductive system in order to improve health care, help to reduce cigarette smoking and provide a better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in reproductive toxicology.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Human Reproduction Update
  • H. Dechaud · S. Assou · T. Anahory · B. Hedon · J. De Vos · S. Hamamah

    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Fertility and Sterility
  • I. Boumela · S. Assou · T. Anahory · B. Hedon · J. De Vos · S. Hamamah

    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Fertility and Sterility

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Fertility and Sterility
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    ABSTRACT: Pericentric inversions (PIs) are structural chromosomal abnormalities, potentially associated with infertility or multiple miscarriages. More rarely, at meiosis, odd numbers of genetic recombinations within the inversion loop produce recombinant gametes which may lead to aneusomy of recombination in the offspring. We report a FISH segregation analysis of an inv5(p15.3q11.2) carrier, both in sperm and blastomeres. In sperm, we directly evaluated the proportion of recombinant gametes and compared the results with chromosomal abnormalities found in blastomeres collected from embryos obtained following a preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) procedure. A total of 7006 sperm nuclei were analyzed. The size of the inverted segment represented 27% of the total length of chromosome 5. The frequencies of balanced chromosomes (normal or inverted), recombinant chromosomes and unbalanced combinations were 97.1, 0.17 and 2.73%, respectively. Of six embryos, PGD FISH analysis revealed that one was a balanced embryo, whereas five were unbalanced and there were no recombinants. This study demonstrated the value of sperm-FISH analysis in providing reproductive genetic counseling for PI carriers. Our study also highlights the clinical relevance of performing PGD instead of prenatal diagnosis.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2010 · Human Reproduction
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    K. Versieren · B. Heindryckx · C. Qian · J. Gerris · P. De Sutter · A. Exposito Navarro · A. Ametzazurra · D. Nagore · L. Crisol · F. Aspichueta · [...] · J. G. Franco · A. Valcarcel · M. I. Viglierchio · M. Tiveron · M. Guidobono · R. Inza · M. Vilela · A. Kenny · C. Lombardi · G. Marconi ·
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: For parthenogenetic blastocyst formation, oocytes can be artificially activated by different physical and chemical stimuli. The main disadvantage of most parthenogenetic activating agents is that they cause a single rise in cytosolic Ca2 + concentrations, different from the Ca2 + oscillations seen during fertilization. In order to improve activation and development after parthenogenesis, we tried to use sperm injection and subsequent removal to mimic more closely the natural Ca2 + increases by releasing the oocyte activating factor. Visualization of the sperm could be accomplished by Hoechst staining. Therefore, we examined first the toxicity of Hoechst staining and UV-irradiation on artificially activated mouse oocytes. Alternatively, we used MitoTracker staining for removal of the sperm. Materials and Methods: In vivo matured mouse oocytes were collected from B6D2F1 females 14h post-hCG. Oocytes were activated by 10mM strontiumchloride in Ca-free KSOM + 2μg/ml cytochalasine D for 4h. One hour after start of activation, the oocytes were stained with Hoechst and irradiated with UV-light. Non-stained activated oocytes were used as positive control. In the first experiment, activated oocytes were stained for 10min with 0.5 or 1μg/ml Hoechst 33258 or 0.5 or 1μg/ml Hoechst 33342. In the second experiment, activated oocytes were stained with 0.5μg/ml Hoechst 33258 for 10, 20 or 30min. In a last experiment, ICSI was performed with sperm that was stained for 10min with 10μM MitoTracker Green FM and sperm was removed after 1h. Oocytes were cultured in KSOM medium and transferred into Cook Blastocyst medium on day 3. Blastocysts were differentially stained and numbers of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) were counted. Results: All oocytes in the first two experiments were activated and cleavage rate ranged from 94% to 100% in the different groups. In the first experiment, blastocyst formation was significantly higher in the positive control group (94%) compared with all other groups. For Hoechst 33258, blastocyst development was significantly higher with 0.5μg/ml (65%) compared to 1μg/ml (21%). For Hoechst 33342, blastocyst rate was 15% with 0.5μg/ml while no blastocysts could be obtained when 1μg/ml was used. The ICM/TE ratio of the blastocysts was significantly lower in the 0.5μg/ml Hoechst 33342 group (0.10 ± 0.06) compared with the groups with Hoechst 33258 (0.20 ± 0.10 for 0.5μg/ml, 0.23 ± 0.15 for 1μg/ml), but all groups were comparable with the positive control group (0.19 ± 0.08). Since the staining of sperm after ICSI was too rapidly fading away for efficient removal after 10min staining, we increased the staining time in the second experiment. Blastocyst rate was significantly higher in the positive control group (96%) compared with all other groups. Development to the blastocyst stage was significantly impaired when oocytes were stained for 20min (31%) or 30min (17%) compared to 10min (59%). No difference was detected in ICM/TE ratio of the blastocysts. In the last experiment, MitoTracker staining was not visible anymore in all oocytes after ICSI. In case the sperm head could be removed, 95% of oocytes died after 1 day. Conclusion: Our results show that both types of Hoechst combined with UV-irradiation have toxic effects on the development of parthenogenetically activated mouse oocytes. Although activation and cleavage rate were not affected, blastocyst formation was significantly reduced. The effects are more severe with Hoechst 33342 than with Hoechst 33258. A higher concentration of Hoechst or longer staining times also significantly reduced blastocyst formation. We can conclude that using Hoechst staining and UV-irradiation should be avoided when working with mouse oocytes. This toxic effect is also relevant for human nuclear transfer since enucleation is frequently performed with Hoechst staining and UV irradiation. Since MitoTracker was also not succesfull for removal of the sperm, alternative methods for sperm identification should be investigated.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2010 · Human Reproduction

  • No preview · Article · May 2010 · Reproductive biomedicine online

  • No preview · Article · May 2010 · Reproductive biomedicine online

  • No preview · Article · May 2010 · Reproductive biomedicine online
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at evaluating parameters and results of ovarian stimulation for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) female patients undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and to assess an eventual association between genotype and ovarian reserve. A retrospective study involved all 17 DM1 patients treated in the study centre's PGD programme. The control group consisted of 22 patients treated for X-linked disorders in the same period. Comparative analysis of ovarian stimulation parameters and results was performed with bivariate and multivariate analysis. Then, among DM1 patients, a correlation between genotype (number of CTG repeats) and ovarian reserve, assessed by antral follicle count, was investigated. Comparative study showed no difference concerning the number of oocytes, embryos and pregnancy rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that DM1 patients needed a significantly higher dose of gonadotrophins (+544IU, P<0.001) than X-linked disorders patients and suggests a decreased ovarian sensitivity. However, with higher dose of gonadotrophins, PGD for DM1 offers good reproductive outcomes with a clinical pregnancy rate of 35.7%. Genotype was not correlated to ovarian reserve and appeared not to be helpful for the choice of the dose of gonadotrophins.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2010 · Reproductive biomedicine online

Publication Stats

428 Citations
181.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montpellier
      • Département de biologie de la reproduction
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2004-2008
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2005
    • Institut de Génétique Humaine
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2003
    • University Hospital Estaing of Clermont-Ferrand
      Clermont, Auvergne, France