Michael D Dake

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States

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Publications (209)

  • Michael D. Dake
    Article · Oct 2012 · Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is routinely used in our Institution for monitoring correct positioning of thoracic aortic stent grafts. We present a case of successful endovascular repair of three discrete thoracic aortic aneurysms with Zenith TX2 endovascular stent grafts in an 82-year-old female patient. Our focus is on the increased value of TEE guidance because of the ability of partial stent deployment and manipulation during insertion.
    Article · Aug 2012 · Annals of Vascular Surgery
  • Michael D Dake
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) most commonly characterized by focal areas of myelin destruction, inflammation and axonal transection. The multicentric inflammation and demyelination of the brain and spinal cord are associated with variable neurologic symptoms ranging from mild dysfunction to debilitating. Typically, these symptoms are marked by episodes of clinical worsening followed by improvement. The cause of this disease remains unclear currently, but the underlying etiology is generally considered to be immunologically based. Other factors, including genetic, environmental and infectious influences have been implicated, as well. Now recent studies have proposed that extracranial venous obstruction, termed chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) may have a role in the pathogenesis of MS or many of its associated clinical manifestations. It is postulated that venous narrowing affecting one or more of the jugular veins and/or the azygous vein in the chest may be responsible for abnormal blood flow in the veins draining the brain and spinal cord. The abnormal flow may initiate and/or sustain a local inflammatory response at the blood-brain barrier that promote pathological changes within the CNS. This review presents the history of the relationship between the vascular system and MS and explores the background of basic and clinical investigations that led to the concept of CCSVI.
    Article · Jun 2012 · Techniques in vascular and interventional radiology
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Endovascular intervention for obstruction to venous drainage of the head and neck is an established treatment for disorders such as superior vena cava syndrome. Some patients with multiple sclerosis have been observed to have anomalies of the veins draining the head and neck. It is possible that some symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis may be secondary to disturbed venous flow. In an uncontrolled clinical series of 40 patients who had been previously diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, anomalies of the venous drainage of the head and neck were observed, including venous stenoses of the internal jugular veins. In 38 of 40 patients, venous stents were placed with restoration of luminal dimensions and abrogation of the venous pressure gradient. The angiographic and hemodynamic improvement was associated with improvement in symptomatology, most particularly in cognitive and constitutional symptoms that may be related to cerebrovenous flow. Serious complications included death in one subject and stent embolization requiring open heart surgery in another. In conclusion, in this series, endovascular intervention to correct venous stenosis associated with multiple sclerosis was associated with improvement in symptoms possibly related to disturbed venous hemodynamics. However, given the serious adverse events in this small series, a randomized clinical trial is required to confirm these findings, and to determine if the procedure has any effect on the progression of multiple sclerosis, or untoward long-term adverse effects.
    Full-text Article · Apr 2012 · Vascular Medicine
  • David L Joyce · Steve K Singh · Hari R Mallidi · Michael D Dake
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: To demonstrate the role of endovascular approaches to the ascending aorta in the post-transplant context. Three patients (2 women and 1 man aged 52, 68, and 43 years, respectively) developed pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta following thoracic organ transplantation. Due to the prohibitive risk of open surgery in each case, an endovascular repair of the ascending aorta was performed, with implantation of 1 to 3 stent-grafts to span the lesions. Follow-up imaging demonstrated complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms, with excellent outcomes at 4 months, 6 months, and 3 years. Stent-grafting of the ascending aorta represents a viable approach to pseudoaneurysm in the post-transplant setting.
    Article · Feb 2012 · Journal of Endovascular Therapy
  • Jacob M Waugh · michael d dake
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Compositions and methods are provided that are useful for the delivery, including transdermal delivery, of biologically active agents, such as non-protein non-nucleotide therapeutics and protein-based therapeutics excluding insulin, botulinum toxins, antibody fragments, and VEGF. The compositions and methods are particularly useful for topical delivery of antifungal agents and antigenic agents suitable for immunization. Alternately, the compositions can be prepared with components useful for targeting the delivery of the compositions as well as imaging components.
    Patent · Jan 2012
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    Karthikeshwar Kasirajan · Michael D Dake · Alan Lumsden · [...] · Michel S Makaroun
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Device-related complications in the thoracic aorta are partly due to the unavoidable proximal angulation and increased flow-related forces. The present study evaluated the incidence, predictors, and outcome of the complication of infolding with the GORE TAG thoracic endoprosthesis (TAG device) to better understand the factors that might help predict these events. We reviewed all complaints reported to W. L. Gore and Associates (Flagstaff, Ariz) related to device infolding after the use of the GORE TAG device on or before December 2008. Events related to device infolding were evaluated. Reporting physicians and local company representatives were contacted, when necessary, to assemble all available imaging, data, and outcomes related to these case reports. When available, computed tomography images were reviewed to confirm aortic landing zone diameters, which were subsequently compared with the implanted device size. From 1998 through December 2008, device infolding was reported in 139 patients (mean age, 40 ± 17 years; 73.4% men) from 33,289 device implants (reported incidence, 0.4%). Events were noted in implants for trauma (60%), dissection (19%), aneurysm (10%), and other (9%) and unknown (2%) etiologies. In 77 patients with available imaging, the average minimum aortic diameter was 21.4 ± 4.4 mm. The mean device diameter was 28.5 ± 3.5 mm, with an average oversizing of nearly 33%. Of reported patients, 51% were asymptomatic, with the diagnosis being made on routine chest imaging. Time to diagnosis was 76 ± 222 days (median, 9.5 days). Only 16 patients received no intervention after the diagnosis of device infolding, all of whom were asymptomatic. The other 123 patients underwent 135 interventions. Of these, 30 patients (24%) underwent open surgical conversion and complete or partial endograft removal. The other interventions included a variety of endovascular techniques, such as large balloon-expandable stent(s) in 40%, relining with additional endograft(s) in 31%, and repeat ballooning in seven patients. Ten patients died after device infolding, all after one or more attempts to repair the infolded device: five died of symptoms related to the infolding and five secondary to the intervention undertaken to correct the device infolding. TAG device infolding appears to be an infrequent event, primarily occurring in young trauma patients secondary to excessive oversizing and severe proximal aortic angulation. However, there clearly exists a need for devices that treat such patients. As a result, future device designs should consider the compression failure mode when being designed in order to help prevent such events.
    Full-text Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter
  • Article · Dec 2011 · Circulation
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    Full-text Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of the American College of Cardiology
  • Michael D Dake · Robert Zivadinov · E Mark Haacke
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a term used to describe impaired venous drainage from the central nervous system (CNS) caused by abnormalities in anatomy and flow affecting the extracranial veins. Recently, it has been proposed that CCSVI may contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). It is hypothesized that venous obstruction results in abnormal flow that promotes inflammation at the blood-brain barrier and that this triggers a process marked by a disturbance of homeostasis within the CNS that leads to demyelination and neurodegeneration. The venous abnormalities of CCSVI are often diagnosed by ultrasound or magnetic resonance venography, however the prevalence of CCSVI detailed in groups of MS patients and patients without MS varies widely in published reports. Increased standardization of diagnostic studies to evaluate both anatomical and physiological findings associated with CCSVI is needed. The purpose of this article is to provide a background to understand the development of the theory of CCSVI and to frame the relevant issues regarding its diagnosis and relationship to the pathogenesis of MS.
    Article · Oct 2011 · Functional neurology
  • Michael D Dake · Dierk Scheinert · Gunnar Tepe · [...] · Thomas Zeller
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: To report a prospective, single-arm, multicenter clinical study evaluating the Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent for treating the above-the-knee femoropopliteal segment (NCT01094678; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov ). The Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent is a self-expanding nitinol stent with a polymer-free paclitaxel coating. Patients with symptomatic (Rutherford category 2-6) de novo or restenotic lesions (including in-stent stenosis) of the above-the-knee femoropopliteal segment were eligible for enrollment. Between April 2006 and June 2008, 787 patients (578 men; mean age 66.6±9.5 years) were enrolled at 30 international sites. Nine hundred lesions (24.3% restenotic lesions of which 59.4% were in-stent stenoses) were treated with 1722 Zilver PTX stents; the mean lesion length was 99.5±82.1 mm. The 12-month Kaplan-Meier estimates included an 89.0% event-free survival rate, an 86.2% primary patency rate, and a 90.5% rate of freedom from target lesion revascularization. There were no paclitaxel-related adverse events reported. The 12-month stent fracture rate was 1.5%. The ankle-brachial index, Rutherford score, and walking distance/speed scores significantly improved (p<0.001) from baseline to 12 months. These results indicate that the Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent is safe for treatment of patients with de novo and restenotic lesions of the above-the-knee femoropopliteal segment. At 1 year, the overall anatomical and clinical effectiveness results suggest that this stent is a promising endovascular therapy.
    Article · Oct 2011 · Journal of Endovascular Therapy
  • Michael D Dake · Gary M Ansel · Michael R Jaff · [...] · Lindsay S Machan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Sustained benefits of drug-eluting stents in femoropopliteal arteries have not been demonstrated. This prospective, multinational, randomized study was designed to compare the 12-month safety and effectiveness of a polymer-free, paclitaxel-coated nitinol drug-eluting stent (DES) with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and provisional bare metal stent (BMS) placement in patients with femoropopliteal peripheral artery disease. Patients were randomly assigned to primary DES implantation (n=236) or PTA (n=238). Demographics and lesion characteristics were similar between groups (eg, average lesion length, approximately 65±40 mm). One hundred twenty patients had acute PTA failure and underwent secondary random assignment to provisional DES (n=61) or BMS (n=59). Primary end points were the 12-month rates of event-free survival and patency in the primary DES and PTA groups. Compared with the PTA group, the primary DES group exhibited superior 12-month event-free survival (90.4% versus 82.6%; P=0.004) and primary patency (83.1% versus 32.8%; P<0.001), satisfying the primary hypotheses. In the secondary evaluations, (1) the primary DES group exhibited superior clinical benefit compared with the PTA group (88.3% versus 75.8%; P<0.001), (2) the provisional DES group exhibited superior primary patency (89.9% versus 73.0%; P=0.01) and superior clinical benefit (90.5% and 72.3%, P=0.009) compared with the provisional BMS group, and (3) the stent fracture rate (both DES and BMS) was 0.9% (4/457). Femoropopliteal peripheral artery disease treatment with the paclitaxel-eluting stent was associated with superior 12-month outcomes compared with PTA and provisional BMS placement.
    Article · Sep 2011 · Circulation Cardiovascular Interventions
  • Jacob M Waugh · michael d dake
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The invention relates to the transdermal application of oligopeptides for reducing synaptic transmission in tissues of an animal. In one aspect, this invention relates to compositions comprising an oligopeptide and optionally a carrier comprising a positively charged "backbone" having positively charged branching or "efficiency" groups, as described herein. Most preferably the positively charged carrier is a long-chain positively charged polypeptide or a positively charged nonpeptidyl polymer, for example, a polyalkyleneimine. The invention further relates methods for producing a biologic effect of reducing synaptic transmission in a tissue by topically applying an effective amount of such a composition, preferably to the skin, of a subject or patient in need of such treatment. This invention also provides kits for preparing or formulating a composition that comprises the oligopeptide and optionally a carrier, as well as such additional items that are needed to produce a usable formulation, or a premix that may in turn be used to produce such a formulation.
    Patent · Sep 2011
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The committee came to the general consensus that the mechanisms for evaluating patients with MS for jugular and azygous venous compromise and the value of treating these lesions with angioplasty warrant careful, well designed additional study. The committee believed the specific parameters needed for a large-scale, pivotal multicenter trial were not necessarily available at this time, but that these types of trials are the mandatory goal for study of CCSVI. Prospective safety and efficacy trials should be conducted in well defined and potentially smaller controlled populations under institutional review board approval. In addition, it is critical to support and continue the basic science work under way to better understand the relationship between venous stenoses and hypertension and the subsequent contribution of CCSVI to patients with MS. Animal models will likely prove useful, though inflammatory mediators may be assessed with serum sampling in the context of human trials. There will be many practitioners who will offer endovascular therapy to patients with MS in advance of the availability of definitive peer-reviewed data in support of that practice. It was the general hope of the committee that this work would lead to additional peer-reviewed studies generating data that clarify the role in MS of treating venous disease with angioplasty and possibly stent placement and the potential adverse events associated with these interventions (65). If additional studies confirm the initial reports in favor of CCSVI diagnosis and treatment, and appropriate study cohorts and standardized procedural technique and reporting are developed, it will be appropriate to pursue prospective multicenter trials. Enrollment in these trials will require the following: (i) confirmation of the diagnosis of MS based on currently accepted criteria; (ii) assessment of disease activity with conventional MR imaging; (iii) determination of clinical and functional status; (iv) listing of previous treatment for MS or other significant medical issues; (v) noninvasive screening documentation of venous disease with US and/or MR imaging/venography; and (vi) catheter-based venographic documentation of venous stenoses. Randomization against catheter venography without angioplasty would be required, with blinding of research personnel and examining neurologists. The potential role of stents would emerge from discussions of trial design. Imaging follow-up and clinical assessments might occur at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, with a crossover permissible after a period yet to be defined. This type of study defines an ultimate goal in determining the contributory role of CCSVI and catheter-based interventions in patients affected with MS.
    Full-text Article · May 2011 · Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR
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    Michael D Dake · Rodney A White · Edward B Diethrich · [...] · Flora Sandra Siami
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The Society for Vascular Surgery Outcomes Committee, including ad hoc members from Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association of Thoracic Surgery, and Society for Interventional Radiology, collected outcomes of patients with traumatic thoracic aortic transections treated with endovascular grafts. Results through 1 year of follow-up are reported. Data from five physician-sponsored investigational device exemption clinical trials from 2000 to 2008 were entered using standardized forms and definitions. Adverse events were reported early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) by body system. Major adverse events included one or more of the following: death, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal failure, respiratory failure, paralysis, or bowel ischemia. There were 60 symptomatic patients (68.3% men; mean age, 46 years) with traumatic aortic transections, of which 97% were due to a motor vehicle accident and 3% were related to other blunt trauma. The average total injury severity score was 39, most with involvement of the chest and abdomen. The average surgical time was 125 minutes. The mean hospital length of stay was 17 days. Associated procedures for the management of nonaortic injuries occurred in 51.7%. All-cause mortality was 9.1% at 30 days and 14.4% at 1 year. One or more major adverse events occurred in 23.3% of the patients, major adverse events occurred early in 20.0% and late in 3.6%. Death accounted for 41.7% of the early and all of the late major adverse events. Early adverse events included 16.7% pulmonary, 13.3% neurologic, and 11.7% vascular complications. Late adverse events included one patient (1.8%) with pulmonary failure and one patient (1.8%) who died of an unknown cause. One-year results of endograft placement for the management of patients with traumatic aortic injury are acceptable. Most cases treated were due to motor vehicle accident and associated with multiple coexisting injuries. Approximately three-quarters of the deaths occurred ≤30 days, indicating the acute severity of the condition. Although the relatively low rates of adverse and major adverse events are consistent with what is anticipated in an otherwise healthy population, future device and procedural developments may facilitate improved outcomes in the future.
    Full-text Article · Apr 2011 · Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of the Zilver PTX Drug-Eluting Stent (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana) in a normal porcine artery model. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed using 18 pigs, each implanted with four paclitaxel-coated stents. Paclitaxel remaining on the stents, delivered locally (to artery wall), regionally (to adjacent and downstream muscle), and systemically (to plasma), was determined at various times through 56 days. For safety evaluation, local, regional, and systemic responses were grossly and histologically assessed at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months in 21 additional pigs and compared with the responses to bare metal stents in 21 separate pigs. Stents delivered approximately 95% of the total paclitaxel within 24 hours after deployment. Nonetheless, there were sustained paclitaxel levels in the artery wall through 56 days, maintained at approximately 20% of the peak level through 14 days. Very little paclitaxel was distributed regionally or systemically, becoming undetectable in plasma at 10 hours. Complete necropsy, hematology, and serum chemistry revealed no adverse effects associated with the paclitaxel-coated stents. Within 3 months, vessels with both paclitaxel-coated and bare metal stents showed comparable, complete healing. The Zilver PTX stent appears to be safe, achieves sustained paclitaxel levels in the artery wall, and shows complete vessel healing comparable to bare metal stents within 3 months.
    Article · Mar 2011 · Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This study analyzed 1-year outcome after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with complicated type B aortic dissection (cTBAoD) who had rupture or malperfusion and symptom onset ≤14 days (acute), 15 to 30 days (subacute), and 31 to 90 days (chronic) until required intervention. The main focus of this report is primarily on the acute cohort. Clinical data were systematically collected from five physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE) clinical trials between 2000 and 2008 using standardized definitions and forms. Adverse events were reported early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) by body system. Major adverse events included death, stroke, myocardial infarction, renal failure, respiratory failure, paralysis, and bowel ischemia. There were 99 cTBAoD patients: 85 were acute, 11 were subacute, and 3 were chronic. Among the acute patients, 31.8% had rupture and 71.8% had malperfusion, including 55.7% lower extremity, 36.1% renal, 19.7% visceral, 8.2% other, and 3.3% spinal cord (patients may have more than one source). Rupture and malperfusion were both reported for three acute patients. Additional findings for the acute cohort included pain (76.5%), hypertension (43.5%), and bleeding (8.2%); comorbidities included hypertension (83.5%), current/past smoking history (69.8%), and diabetes (12.9%). The main focus of this analysis was the acute cohort (n = 85). Age averaged 59 years (72.9% male). Early adverse events included pulmonary (36.5%), vascular (28.2%), renal (25.9%), and neurologic (23.5%). Early major adverse events occurred in 37.6% of patients, including death (10.6%), stroke (9.4%), renal failure (9.4%), and paralysis (9.4%); late adverse events included vascular (15.8%), cardiac (10.5%), gastrointestinal (6.6%), and hemorrhage (5.3%). The point-estimate mortality rate was 10.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1-17.5) at 30 days and 29.4 (95% CI, 18.4-40.4) at 1 year, when 34 patients remained at risk. Emergency TEVAR for patients with cTBAoD (malperfusion or rupture) provided acceptable mortality and morbidity results out to 1 year. Manufacturers can use this 30-day mortality point-estimate of 10.8 (95% CI, 4.1-17.5) for the acute cohort to establish a performance goal for use in single-arm commercial IDE trials if the Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory bodies concur.
    Full-text Article · Feb 2011 · Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter
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    Hao-Ming Hsiao · Michael D. Dake · Santosh Prabhu · [...] · Alexander Nikanorov
    Full-text Chapter · Jan 2011
  • Jacob M Waugh · Jane Lee · Michael D Dake · Dan Browne
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Considerations in rational designs of CPP-based transcutaneous delivery systems are described. Impact of design considerations of nonclinical and clinical results are presented in detail.
    Article · Jan 2011 · Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Carotid atherosclerotic plaque rupture is thought to cause transient ischemic attack (TIA) and ischemic stroke (IS). Pathological hallmarks of these plaques have been identified through observational studies. Although generally accepted, the relationship between cerebral thromboembolism and in situ atherosclerotic plaque morphology has never been directly observed noninvasively in the acute setting. Consecutive acutely symptomatic patients referred for stroke protocol magnetic resonance imaging/angiography underwent additional T1- and T2-weighted carotid bifurcation imaging with the use of a 3-dimensional technique with blood signal suppression. Two blinded reviewers performed plaque gradings according to the American Heart Association classification system. Discharge outcomes and brain magnetic resonance imaging results were obtained. Image quality for plaque characterization was adequate in 86 of 106 patients (81%). Eight TIA/IS patients with noncarotid pathogenesis were excluded, yielding 78 study patients (38 men and 40 women with a mean age of 64.3 years, SD 14.7) with 156 paired watershed vessel/cerebral hemisphere observations. Thirty-seven patients had 40 TIA/IS events. There was a significant association between type VI plaque (demonstrating cap rupture, hemorrhage, and/or thrombosis) and ipsilateral TIA/IS (P<0.001). A multiple logistic regression model including standard Framingham risk factors and type VI plaque was constructed. Type VI plaque was the dominant outcome-associated observation achieving significance (P<0.0001; odds ratio, 11.66; 95% confidence interval, 5.31 to 25.60). In situ type VI carotid bifurcation region plaque identified by magnetic resonance imaging is associated with ipsilateral acute TIA/IS as an independent identifier of events, thereby supporting the dominant disease pathophysiology.
    Full-text Article · Nov 2010 · Circulation

Publication Stats

12k Citations

Institutions

  • 2007
    • University of Virginia
      Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • 1993-2004
    • Stanford University
      • Division of Interventional Radiology
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 1998-2003
    • Stanford Medicine
      • • Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery
      • • Division of Interventional Radiology
      Stanford, California, United States
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      Los Ángeles, California, United States
  • 2001
    • Savannah Vascular & Cardiac Institute
      Savannah, Georgia, United States