Talia Zaider

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States

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Publications (24)51.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The purpose of this paper is to report on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a Communication Skills Training (CST) module for inpatient oncology nurses on how to respond empathically to patients. Methods: 248 nurses from a USA cancer center participated in a CST module on responding empathically to patients. Nurses completed pre- and post-training Standardized Patient Assessments (SPAs), a survey on their confidence in and intent to utilize skills taught, and a six-month post-training survey of self-reported use of skills. Results: Results indicate that nurses were satisfied with the module, reporting that agreement or strong agreement to 5 out of 6 items assessing satisfaction 96.7%-98.0% of the time. Nurses' self-efficacy in responding empathically significantly increased pre- to post-training. Additionally, nurses showed empathy skill improvement in the post-SPAs. Finally, 88.2% of nurses reported feeling confident in using the skills they learned post-training and reported an increase of 42-63% in the use of specific empathic skills. Conclusions: A CST module for nurses in responding empathically to patients showed feasibility, acceptability, and improvement in self-efficacy as well as skill uptake. Practice implications: This CST module provides an easily targeted intervention for improving nurse-patient communication and patient-centered care.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Patient Education and Counseling
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Effective communication, particularly at the end of life, is an essential skill for oncology nurses, but few receive formal training in this area. Objectives: The aim of this article is to adapt an end-of-life care communication skills training (CST) module, originally developed for oncologists, for oncology nurses and to evaluate participants' confidence in using the communication skills learned and their satisfaction with the module. Methods: The adapted end-of-life care module consisted of a 45-minute didactic, exemplary video and 90 minutes of small group interaction and experiential role play with a simulated patient. Using a five-point Likert-type scale, 247 inpatient oncology nurses completed pre-/post-workshop surveys rating their confidence in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care with patients, as well as overall satisfaction with the module. Findings: Nurses' confidence in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care increased significantly after attending the workshop. Nurse participants indicated satisfaction with the module by agreeing or strongly agreeing to all six items assessing satisfaction 90%-98% of the time. Nurses' CST in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life care showed feasibility, acceptability, and potential benefit at improving confidence in having end-of-life care discussions.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
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    ABSTRACT: The benefits of effective communication in an oncology setting are multifold and include the overall well-being of patients and health professionals, adherence to treatment regimens, psychological functioning, and improvements in quality of life. Nevertheless, there are substantial barriers and communication challenges reported by oncology nurses. This study was conducted to present a summary of communication challenges faced by oncology nurses. From November 2012 to March 2014, 121 inpatient nurses working in the oncology setting participated in an online pre-training qualitative survey that asked nurses to describe common communication challenges in communicating empathy and discussing death, dying, and end-of-life (EOL) goals of care. The results revealed six themes that describe the challenges in communicating empathically: dialectic tensions, burden of carrying bad news, lack of skills for providing empathy, perceived institutional barriers, challenging situations, and perceived dissimilarities between the nurse and the patient. The results for challenges in discussing death, dying and EOL goals of care revealed five themes: dialectic tensions, discussing specific topics related to EOL, lack of skills for providing empathy, patient/family characteristics, and perceived institutional barriers. This study emphasizes the need for institutions to provide communication skills training to their oncology nurses for navigating through challenging patient interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Nurse education in practice
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated intimacy as a mechanism for the effects of holding back sharing concerns about cancer on couples' psychological distress, well-being, and marital satisfaction using the actor-partner interdependence model (APIM), and evaluated 2 possible moderators of these associations: the number of patient and spouse cancer concerns. We had 139 men treated for localized prostate cancer in the past year and their spouses complete surveys about holding back sharing cancer concerns, intimacy, distress, and relationship satisfaction, as well as patient and spouse cancer concerns. APIM-indicated that the association between holding back sharing concerns, and patient and spouse distress, well-being, and relationship satisfaction could be partially accounted for by their influence on patient and spouse perceptions of relationship intimacy. The number of cancer concerns did not moderate the mediational model. Holding back has strong associations with both partners' well-being and distress. Holding back sharing concerns was particularly detrimental for couples' intimacy and relationship satisfaction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Family Psychology

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Psycho-Oncology

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Psycho-Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: A healthy diet and physical activity are recommended for prostate cancer survivors. Interdependence theory suggests that the spousal relationship influences those health behaviours and the degree of correspondence may be an indicator of this influence. This study evaluated the correspondence between prostate cancer survivors and spouses regarding physical activity and fruit/vegetable consumption. Baseline data from an ongoing randomised control trial were utilised. Men who had been treated for prostate cancer within the past year and their partners (N = 132 couples) completed self-report measures of physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, relationship satisfaction and support for partner's healthy diet and physical activity. Couples reported similar fruit/vegetable consumption and physical activity as indicated by high levels of correspondence. Greater fruit/vegetable correspondence was related to higher relationship satisfaction (F = 4.14, P = 0.018) and greater patient (F = 13.29, P < 0.001) and spouse-rated support (F = 7.2, P < 0.001). Greater physical activity correspondence was related to greater patient (F = 3.57, P = 0.028) and spouse-rated support (F = 4.59, P = 0.031). Prostate cancer survivors and spouses may influence each other's diet and exercise behaviours. Couple-based interventions may promote healthy behaviours among this population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · European Journal of Cancer Care

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Caregiving partners constitute a unique group, who provide both physical and emotional care for patients. There has been extensive research conducted on caregivers during either the caregiving or bereavement phase; however, these phases are often treated as separate entities rather than as part of a continuum. Method: In this paper, utilizing relevant literature and clinical observations, we map the emotional journey and lived experience of caregivers moving from disease progression, to the end of life, to the dying process itself, and then through life after the death of a partner. Along this journey, we identify the links between pre-death caregiving and bereavement. Results: Our illustration raises awareness regarding the unmet needs experienced by caregiving partners across the continuum and provides an alternative framework through which clinicians can view this course. Significance: of Results We bolster arguments for improved palliative care services and early interventions with distressed caregiving partners by emphasizing continuity of care both before and after a patient's death.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Palliative and Supportive Care
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    ABSTRACT: We examine psychosocial outcomes following the first year of bereavement, for 51 family caregivers, including both spouses and offspring. Researchers assessed caregivers during palliative care and again during the second year of bereavement, for social functioning, depression, and distress. For all family caregivers, only depression scores declined significantly between T1 and T2 (p < 0.05). Caregiver relationship and gender did not make a difference in recovery. Results demonstrate that poor psychosocial health outcomes exist beyond the first year of bereavement. Early identification of these caregivers is necessary to provide mental health professionals the opportunity to intervene proactively.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Death Studies
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most frequent sources of distress after treatment for prostate cancer (PCa), yet evidence suggests that men do not easily adjust to loss of sexual function over time. A hypothesized determinant of men's adaptation to ED is the degree to which they experience a loss of masculine identity in the aftermath of PCa treatment. Aims. The aims of this study were (i) to describe the prevalence of concerns related to diminished masculinity among men treated for localized PCa; (ii) to determine whether diminished masculinity is associated with sexual bother, after controlling for sexual functioning status; and (iii) to determine whether men's marital quality moderates the association between diminished masculinity and sexual bother. Methods. We analyzed cross-sectional data provided by 75 men with localized PCa who were treated at one of two cancer centers. Data for this study were provided at a baseline assessment as part of their enrollment in a pilot trial of a couple-based intervention. Main Outcome Measures. The sexual bother subscale from the Prostate Health-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire and the Masculine Self-Esteem and Marital Affection subscales from Clark et al's PCa-related quality-of-life scale. Results. Approximately one-third of men felt they had lost a dimension of their masculinity following treatment. Diminished masculinity was the only significant, independent predictor of sexual bother, even after accounting for sexual functioning status. The association between diminished masculinity and sexual bother was strongest for men whose spouses perceived low marital affection. Conclusions. Diminished masculinity is a prominent, yet understudied concern for PCa survivors. Regardless of functional status, men who perceive a loss of masculinity following treatment may be more likely to be distressed by their ED. Furthermore, its impact on adjustment in survivorship may rely on the quality of their intimate relationships. Zaider T, Manne S, Nelson C, Mulhall J, and Kissane D. Loss of masculine identity, marital affection, and sexual bother in men with localized prostate cancer. J Sex Med **;**:**–**.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2012 · Journal of Sexual Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Few couple-focused interventions have been developed to improve distress and relationship outcomes among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. We examined the effects of a five-session Intimacy-Enhancing Therapy (IET) vs. Usual Care (UC) on the psychological and relationship functioning of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. Pre-intervention levels of psychological and relationship functioning were evaluated as moderators of intervention effects. Seventy-one survivors and their partners completed a baseline survey and were subsequently randomly assigned to receive five sessions of IET or UC (no treatment). Eight weeks after the baseline assessment, a follow-up survey was administered to survivor and partner. Distress, well-being, relationship satisfaction, relationship intimacy, and communication were investigated as the main outcomes. IET effects were largely moderated by pre-intervention psychosocial and relationship factors. Those survivors who had higher levels of cancer concerns at pretreatment had significantly reduced concerns following IET. Similar moderating effects for pre-intervention levels were reported for the effects of IET on self-disclosure, perceived partner disclosure, and perceived partner responsiveness. Among partners beginning the intervention with higher cancer-specific distress, lower marital satisfaction, lower intimacy, and poorer communication, IET improved these outcomes. IET had a marginally significant main effect upon survivor well-being but was effective among couples with fewer personal and relationship resources. Subsequent research is needed to replicate these findings with a larger sample and a longer follow-up.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2011 · Journal of Sexual Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction.  Few couple-focused interventions have been developed to improve distress and relationship outcomes among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners.Aims.  We examined the effects of a five-session Intimacy-Enhancing Therapy (IET) vs. Usual Care (UC) on the psychological and relationship functioning of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. Pre-intervention levels of psychological and relationship functioning were evaluated as moderators of intervention effects.Methods.  Seventy-one survivors and their partners completed a baseline survey and were subsequently randomly assigned to receive five sessions of IET or UC (no treatment). Eight weeks after the baseline assessment, a follow-up survey was administered to survivor and partner.Main Outcome Measures.  Distress, well-being, relationship satisfaction, relationship intimacy, and communication were investigated as the main outcomes.Results.  IET effects were largely moderated by pre-intervention psychosocial and relationship factors. Those survivors who had higher levels of cancer concerns at pretreatment had significantly reduced concerns following IET. Similar moderating effects for pre-intervention levels were reported for the effects of IET on self-disclosure, perceived partner disclosure, and perceived partner responsiveness. Among partners beginning the intervention with higher cancer-specific distress, lower marital satisfaction, lower intimacy, and poorer communication, IET improved these outcomes.Conclusions.  IET had a marginally significant main effect upon survivor well-being but was effective among couples with fewer personal and relationship resources. Subsequent research is needed to replicate these findings with a larger sample and a longer follow-up. Manne SL, Nelson CJ, Kissane DW, Mulhall JP, Winkel G, and Zaider T. Intimacy-enhancing psychological intervention for men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their partners: A pilot study. J Sex Med 2011;8:1197–1209.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · Journal of Sexual Medicine
  • Talia Zaider · David Kissane
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    ABSTRACT: This chapter examines a model of family resilience it applies to the setting of palliative care. It attempts to address a question about the characteristics of resilience in families and describes a recently developed model for understanding families in palliative care. It explains the concept and the underlying principles of so-called Family Focused Grief Therapy. It also suggests that the developmental life cycle of the family and its functioning as a group are key parameters in the conceptualization of family resilience.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Little attention has been paid to the role of nonspecific therapy processes in the efficacy of psychological interventions for individuals diagnosed with cancer. The goal of the current study was to examine the three constructs from the generic model of psychotherapy (GMP): therapeutic alliance, therapeutic realizations, and therapeutic openness/involvement in the treatment outcome of women with gynecological cancers attending either a 7-session supportive counseling intervention or a coping and communication skills intervention. Two hundred and three women completed measures of alliance, realizations, and openness after Intervention Sessions 2, 3, and 6, as well as measures of depressive symptoms after these sessions and 6 months after the pre-intervention assessment (posttreatment). Consistent with the GMP, in early sessions, therapeutic bond predicted openness in terms of positive affect experienced during sessions, and both aspects of openness (positive and negative affect), in turn, predicted more therapeutic realizations. Therapeutic realizations predicted perceptions of greater session progress, and greater therapeutic bond predicted more therapeutic realizations. When early session GMP variables were used to predict later GMP processes and outcomes and posttreatment outcomes, early therapeutic bond predicted later session therapeutic realizations directly and indirectly via emotional arousal, emotional arousal predicted session progress, session progress predicted lower postsession depressive symptoms, and depressive symptoms as rated after Session 6 predicted depressive symptoms 3 months posttreatment. However, a number of additional associations among GMP processes were found. Our results suggest that therapy processes played a role in predicting both short- and long-term treatment outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2010 · Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
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    Talia I Zaider · Richard G Heimberg · Masumi Iida
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    ABSTRACT: Although adults with anxiety disorders often report interpersonal distress, the degree to which anxiety is linked to the quality of close relationships remains unclear. The authors examined the relational impact of anxiety by sampling the daily mood and relationship quality of 33 couples in which the wife was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Use of a daily process design improved on prior methodologies by capturing relational processes closer to their actual occurrence and in the setting of the diagnosed partner's anxiety. Analyses revealed significant associations between wives' daily anxiety and both partners' perceptions of relationship quality. Associations were moderated by anxiety-specific support. Results also indicated significant concordance between wives' daily anxiety and husbands' distress. Concordance was stronger for husbands who reported frequent accommodation of wives' anxiety symptoms. Findings are discussed in the context of existing evidence on the social costs of anxiety disorders.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2010 · Journal of Abnormal Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Social anxiety disorder is a prevalent and impairing disorder for which viable cognitive-behavioral therapies exist. However, these treatments have not been easily packaged for dissemination and may be underutilized as a result. The current study reports on the findings of a randomized controlled trial of a manualized and workbook-driven individual cognitive-behavioral treatment for social anxiety disorder (Hope, Heimberg, Juster, & Turk, 2000; Hope, Heimberg, & Turk, 2006). This treatment package was derived from an empirically supported group treatment for social anxiety disorder and intended for broad dissemination, but it has not previously been subjected to empirical examination on its own. As a first step in that examination, 38 clients seeking treatment for social anxiety disorder at either the Adult Anxiety Clinic of Temple University or the Anxiety Disorders Clinic of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln were randomly assigned to receive either immediate treatment with this cognitive-behavioral treatment package or treatment delayed for 20 weeks. Evaluation at the posttreatment/postdelay period revealed substantially greater improvements among immediate treatment clients on interviewer-rated and self-report measures of social anxiety and impairment. Three-month follow-up assessment revealed maintenance of gains. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · Behavior therapy
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated intimacy as a mechanism for the effects of relationship-enhancing (self-disclosure, mutual constructive communication) and relationship-compromising communication (holding back, mutual avoidance, and demand-withdraw communication) on couples' psychological distress. Seventy-five men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in the past year and their partners completed surveys about communication, intimacy, and distress. Multi-level models with the couple as unit of analyses indicated that the association between mutual constructive communication, mutual avoidance, and patient demand-partner withdraw and distress could be accounted for by their influence on relationship intimacy. Intimacy did not mediate associations between self-disclosure, holding back, and partner demand-patient withdraw communication and distress. These findings indicate that the way in which couples talk about cancer-related concerns as well as the degree to which one or both partners avoid talking about cancer-related concerns can either facilitate or reduce relationship intimacy, and that it is largely by this mechanism that these three communication strategies impact psychological distress. Relationship intimacy and how patients and partners communicate to achieve this intimacy is important for the psychological adjustment of early stage prostate cancer survivors and their partners.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · Journal of Cancer Survivorship
  • Talia Zaider · David Kissane
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    ABSTRACT: In the advanced stages of illness, families manage multiple caregiving demands while facing the emotional task of preparing for the loss of their loved one. Palliative care settings are well suited to identifying families at risk for elevated distress, and providing support as they navigate this process. This review summarizes current research in the assessment and management of family distress at the end of life. The recent literature on families of terminally ill cancer patients has provided a more precise description of the relational and cultural factors that contribute to family distress. Studies eliciting the perspectives of family members on what is needed at the end of life affirm the importance of supportive communication and continuity of psychosocial care into bereavement. Other developments include efforts to establish guidelines for conducting family meetings in the palliative care setting, and to train palliative care practitioners in family-centered assessment techniques. Finally, there is a limited but growing evidence base for the utility of delivering family-focused psychosocial interventions during palliative care. The knowledge gained from current research on what is most salient to family members during palliative care is critical for ensuring effective delivery of supportive services and collaborative engagement in those services.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2009 · Current opinion in supportive and palliative care
  • David Kissane · Wendy G Lichtenthal · Talia Zaider
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    ABSTRACT: Distress reverberates throughout the family during palliative care and bereavement, inviting consideration of a family-centered model of care. Targeting families thought to be "at risk" has merit. The Family Focused Grief Therapy model was tested in a randomized controlled trial of 81 families (353 individuals) and bereavement outcome is reported here for treatment completers compared to controls. There were no significant baseline differences between treatment completers and non-completers. Significant reduction in distress occurred at 13 months post death for the families completing treatment, with further improvements for the 10% of individuals most distressed at baseline. A preventive model of family-centered care applied to those at greatest risk is meritorious and in keeping with the aspirations of Cicely Saunders for improving the quality of hospice care.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2007 · OMEGA--Journal of Death and Dying

Publication Stats

425 Citations
51.67 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2003-2010
    • Temple University
      • Department of Psychology
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States