Erica E Davis

Indiana Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States

Are you Erica E Davis?

Claim your profile

Publications (56)749.01 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Circumferential skin creases Kunze type (CSC-KT) is a specific congenital entity with an unknown genetic cause. The disease phenotype comprises characteristic circumferential skin creases accompanied by intellectual disability, a cleft palate, short stature, and dysmorphic features. Here, we report that mutations in either MAPRE2 or TUBB underlie the genetic origin of this syndrome. MAPRE2 encodes a member of the microtubule end-binding family of proteins that bind to the guanosine triphosphate cap at growing microtubule plus ends, and TUBB encodes a β-tubulin isotype that is expressed abundantly in the developing brain. Functional analyses of the TUBB mutants show multiple defects in the chaperone-dependent tubulin heterodimer folding and assembly pathway that leads to a compromised yield of native heterodimers. The TUBB mutations also have an impact on microtubule dynamics. For MAPRE2, we show that the mutations result in enhanced MAPRE2 binding to microtubules, implying an increased dwell time at microtubule plus ends. Further, in vivo analysis of MAPRE2 mutations in a zebrafish model of craniofacial development shows that the variants most likely perturb the patterning of branchial arches, either through excessive activity (under a recessive paradigm) or through haploinsufficiency (dominant de novo paradigm). Taken together, our data add CSC-KT to the growing list of tubulinopathies and highlight how multiple inheritance paradigms can affect dosage-sensitive biological systems so as to result in the same clinical defect.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The American Journal of Human Genetics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35-38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The American Journal of Human Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe an X-linked genetic syndrome associated with mutations in TAF1 and manifesting with global developmental delay, intellectual disability (ID), characteristic facial dysmorphology, generalized hypotonia, and variable neurologic features, all in male individuals. Simultaneous studies using diverse strategies led to the identification of nine families with overlapping clinical presentations and affected by de novo or maternally inherited single-nucleotide changes. Two additional families harboring large duplications involving TAF1 were also found to share phenotypic overlap with the probands harboring single-nucleotide changes, but they also demonstrated a severe neurodegeneration phenotype. Functional analysis with RNA-seq for one of the families suggested that the phenotype is associated with downregulation of a set of genes notably enriched with genes regulated by E-box proteins. In addition, knockdown and mutant studies of this gene in zebrafish have shown a quantifiable, albeit small, effect on a neuronal phenotype. Our results suggest that mutations in TAF1 play a critical role in the development of this X-linked ID syndrome.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The American Journal of Human Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The callipyge phenotype is an ovine muscular hypertrophy characterized by polar overdominance: only heterozygous +Mat/CLPGPat animals receiving the CLPG mutation from their father express the phenotype. +Mat/CLPGPat animals are characterized by postnatal, ectopic expression of Delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1) and Paternally expressed gene 11/Retrotransposon-like 1 (PEG11/RTL1) proteins in skeletal muscle. We showed previously in transgenic mice that ectopic expression of DLK1 alone induces a muscular hypertrophy, hence demonstrating a role for DLK1 in determining the callipyge hypertrophy. We herein describe newly generated transgenic mice that ectopically express PEG11 in skeletal muscle, and show that they also exhibit a muscular hypertrophy phenotype. Our data suggest that both DLK1 and PEG11 act together in causing the muscular hypertrophy of callipyge sheep.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: African Americans have a disproportionate risk for developing nephropathy. This disparity has been attributed to coding variants (G1 and G2) in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1); however, there is little functional evidence supporting the role of this protein in renal function. Here, we combined genetics and in vivo modeling to examine the role of apol1 in glomerular development and pronephric filtration and to test the pathogenic potential of APOL1 G1 and G2. Translational suppression or CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of apol1 in zebrafish embryos results in podocyte loss and glomerular filtration defects. Complementation of apol1 morphants with wild-type human APOL1 mRNA rescues these defects. However, the APOL1 G1 risk allele does not ameliorate defects caused by apol1 suppression and the pathogenicity is conferred by the cis effect of both individual variants of the G1 risk haplotype (I384M/S342G). In vivo complementation studies of the G2 risk allele also indicate that the variant is deleterious to protein function. Moreover, APOL1 G2, but not G1, expression alone promotes developmental kidney defects, suggesting a possible dominant-negative effect of the altered protein. In sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, we reported previously a genetic interaction between APOL1 and MYH9. Testing this interaction in vivo by co-suppressing both transcripts yielded no additive effects. However, upon genetic or chemical induction of anemia, we observed a significantly exacerbated nephropathy phenotype. Furthermore, concordant with the genetic interaction observed in SCD patients, APOL1 G2 reduces myh9 expression in vivo, suggesting a possible interaction between the altered APOL1 and myh9. Our data indicate a critical role for APOL1 in renal function that is compromised by nephropathy-risk encoding variants. Moreover, our interaction studies indicate that the MYH9 locus is also relevant to the phenotype in a stressed microenvironment and suggest that consideration of the context-dependent functions of both proteins will be required to develop therapeutic paradigms.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · PLoS Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patterns of amino acid conservation have served as a tool for understanding protein evolution. The same principles have also found broad application in human genomics, driven by the need to interpret the pathogenic potential of variants in patients. Here we performed a systematic comparative genomics analysis of human disease-causing missense variants. We found that an appreciable fraction of disease-causing alleles are fixed in the genomes of other species, suggesting a role for genomic context. We developed a model of genetic interactions that predicts most of these to be simple pairwise compensations. Functional testing of this model on two known human disease genes revealed discrete cis amino acid residues that, although benign on their own, could rescue the human mutations in vivo. This approach was also applied to ab initio gene discovery to support the identification of a de novo disease driver in BTG2 that is subject to protective cis-modification in more than 50 species. Finally, on the basis of our data and models, we developed a computational tool to predict candidate residues subject to compensation. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of cis-genomic context as a contributor to protein evolution; they provide an insight into the complexity of allele effect on phenotype; and they are likely to assist methods for predicting allele pathogenicity.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Nature
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: -Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an autosomal dominant, genetically heterogeneous cardiomyopathy with variable severity, which may co-occur with cardiac hypertrophy. -Here, we generated whole exome sequence (WES) data from multiple members from five families with LVNC. In four out of five families, the candidate causative mutation segregates with disease in known LVNC genes MYH7 and TPM1. Subsequent sequencing of MYH7 in a larger LVNC cohort identified seven novel likely disease causing variants. In the fifth family, we identified a frameshift mutation in NNT, a nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein, not implicated previously in human cardiomyopathies. Resequencing of NNT in additional LVNC families identified a second likely pathogenic missense allele. Suppression of nnt in zebrafish caused early ventricular malformation and contractility defects, likely driven by altered cardiomyocyte proliferation. In vivo complementation studies showed that mutant human NNT failed to rescue nnt morpholino-induced heart dysfunction, indicating a probable haploinsufficiency mechanism. -Together, our data expand the genetic spectrum of LVNC and demonstrate how the intersection of WES with in vivo functional studies can accelerate the identification of genes that drive human genetic disorders.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Human peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood represent attractive sources of cells for reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, to date, most of the blood-derived iPSCs were generated using either integrating methods or starting from T-lymphocytes that have genomic rearrangements thus bearing uncertain consequences when using iPSC-derived lineages for disease modeling and cell therapies. Recently, both peripheral blood and cord blood cells have been reprogrammed into transgene-free iPSC using the Sendai viral vector. Here we demonstrate that peripheral blood can be utilized for medium-throughput iPSC production without the need to maintain cell culture prior to reprogramming induction. Cell reprogramming can also be accomplished with as little as 3000 previously cryopreserved cord blood cells under feeder-free and chemically defined Xeno-free conditions that are compliant with standard Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) regulations. The first iPSC colonies appear 2–3 weeks faster in comparison to previous reports. Notably, these peripheral blood- and cord blood-derived iPSCs are free of detectable immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements, suggesting they did not originate from B- or T- lymphoid cells. The iPSCs are pluripotent as evaluated by the scorecard assay and in vitro multi lineage functional cell differentiation. Our data show that small volumes of cryopreserved peripheral blood or cord blood cells can be reprogrammed efficiently at a convenient, cost effective and scalable way. In summary, our method expands the reprogramming potential of limited or archived samples either stored at blood banks or obtained from pediatric populations that cannot easily provide large quantities of peripheral blood or a skin biopsy. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12015-015-9586-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Stem cell reviews
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex functions at the transition zone, located between the basal body and axoneme, to regulate the localization of ciliary membrane proteins. We investigated the role of Tmem231, a two-pass transmembrane protein, in MKS complex formation and function. Consistent with a role in transition zone function, mutation of mouse Tmem231 disrupts the localization of proteins including Arl13b and Inpp5e to cilia, resulting in phenotypes characteristic of MKS such as polydactyly and kidney cysts. Tmem231 and B9d1 are essential for each other and other complex components such as Mks1 to localize to the transition zone. As in mouse, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of Tmem231 localizes to and controls transition zone formation and function, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for Tmem231. We identified TMEM231 mutations in orofaciodigital syndrome type 3 (OFD3) and MKS patients that compromise transition zone function. Thus, Tmem231 is critical for organizing the MKS complex and controlling ciliary composition, defects in which cause OFD3 and MKS. © 2015 Roberson et al.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · The Journal of Cell Biology
  • Source
    Kavita Praveen · Erica E Davis · Nicholas Katsanis
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy, but represents the sole entity from this class of disorders that results from the dysfunction of motile cilia. Characterized by respiratory problems appearing in childhood, infertility, and situs defects in ~50% of individuals, PCD has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. The diagnosis of PCD can be prolonged due to a lack of disease awareness, coupled with the fact that symptoms can be confused with other more common genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, or environmental insults that result in frequent respiratory infections. A primarily autosomal recessive disorder, PCD is genetically heterogeneous with >30 causal genes identified, posing significant challenges to genetic diagnosis. Here, we provide an overview of PCD as a disorder underscored by impaired ciliary motility; we discuss the recent advances towards uncovering the genetic basis of PCD; we discuss the molecular knowledge gained from PCD gene discovery, which has improved our understanding of motile ciliary assembly; and we speculate on how accelerated diagnosis, together with detailed phenotypic data, will shape the genetic and functional architecture of this disorder.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · F1000 Prime Reports
  • Erica E Davis · Nicholas Katsanis
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for proper function of cilia, although many of the mechanistic details underlying this process are obscure. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell illuminate key functions of one IFT protein, IFT27, and offer clues into how IFT cargo is selected and transported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Developmental Cell
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Neurodevelopmental defects in humans represent a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report the genetic and functional dissection of a multigenerational pedigree with an X-linked syndromic disorder hallmarked by microcephaly, growth retardation, and seizures. Using an X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) next-generation sequencing diagnostic panel, we identified a novel missense mutation in the gene encoding 60S ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10), a locus associated previously with autism spectrum disorders (ASD); the p.K78E change segregated with disease under an X-linked recessive paradigm while, consistent with causality, carrier females exhibited skewed X inactivation. To examine the functional consequences of the p.K78E change, we modeled RPL10 dysfunction in zebrafish. We show that endogenous rpl10 expression is augmented in anterior structures, and that suppression decreases head size in developing morphant embryos, concomitant with reduced bulk translation and increased apoptosis in the brain. Subsequently, using in vivo complementation, we demonstrate that p.K78E is a loss-of-function variant. Together, our findings suggest that a mutation within the conserved N-terminal end of RPL10, a protein in close proximity to the peptidyl transferase active site of the 60S ribosomal subunit, causes severe defects in brain formation and function.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Genetics
  • Erica E Davis · Stephan Frangakis · Nicholas Katsanis
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid advances and cost erosion in exome and genome analysis of patients with both rare and common genetic disorders has accelerated gene discovery and illuminated fundamental biological mechanisms. The thrill of discovery has been accompanied, however, with the sobering appreciation that human genomes are burdened with a large number of rare and ultra rare variants, thereby posing a significant challenge in dissecting both the effect of such alleles on protein function and the biological relevance of these events to patient pathology. In an effort to develop model systems that are able to generate surrogates of human pathologies, a powerful suite of tools have been developed in zebrafish, taking advantage of the relatively small (compared to invertebrate models) evolutionary distance of that genome to humans, the orthology of several organs and signaling processes, and the suitability of this organism for medium and high throughput phenotypic screening. Here we will review the use of this model organism in dissecting human genetic disorders; we will highlight how diverse strategies have informed disease causality and genetic architecture; and we will discuss relative strengths and limitations of these approaches in the context of medical genome sequencing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Homozygosity for a recurrent 290 kb deletion of NPHP1 is the most frequent cause of isolated nephronophthisis (NPHP) in humans. A deletion of the same genomic interval has also been detected in individuals with Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and in the mouse, Nphp1 interacts genetically with Ahi1, a known JBTS locus. Given these observations, we investigated the contribution of NPHP1 in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a ciliopathy of intermediate severity. By using a combination of array-comparative genomic hybridization, TaqMan copy number assays, and sequencing, we studied 200 families affected by BBS. We report a homozygous NPHP1 deletion CNV in a family with classical BBS that is transmitted with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Further, we identified heterozygous NPHP1 deletions in two more unrelated persons with BBS who bear primary mutations at another BBS locus. In parallel, we identified five families harboring an SNV in NPHP1 resulting in a conserved missense change, c.14G>T (p.Arg5Leu), that is enriched in our Hispanic pedigrees; in each case, affected individuals carried additional bona fide pathogenic alleles in another BBS gene. In vivo functional modeling in zebrafish embryos demonstrated that c.14G>T is a loss-of-function variant, and suppression of nphp1 in concert with each of the primary BBS loci found in our NPHP1-positive pedigrees exacerbated the severity of the phenotype. These results suggest that NPHP1 mutations are probably rare primary causes of BBS that contribute to the mutational burden of the disorder.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The American Journal of Human Genetics
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · Apr 2014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Mutations at some retinitis pigmentosa (RP) loci are associated with variable penetrance and expressivity, exacerbating diagnostic challenges. The purpose of this study was to dissect the genetic underpinnings of nonsyndromic RP with variable age of onset in a large Mexican family. Methods: We ascertained members of a large, multigenerational pedigree using a complete ophthalmic examination. We performed whole exome sequencing on two affected first cousins, an obligate carrier, and a married-in spouse. Confirmatory sequencing of candidate variants was performed in the entire pedigree, as well as genotyping and mRNA studies to investigate expression changes in the causal locus. Results: We identified a 14-base pair (bp) deletion in PRPF31, a gene implicated previously in autosomal dominant (ad) RP. The mutation segregated with the phenotype of all 10 affected females, but also was present in six asymptomatics (two females and four males). Studies in patient cells showed that the penetrance/expressivity of the PRPF31 deletion allele was concordant with the expression levels of wild-type message. However, neither the known PRPF31 modulators nor cis-eQTLs within 1 Mb of the locus could account for the variable expression of message or the clinical phenotype. Conclusions: We have identified a novel 14-bp deletion in PRPF31 as the genetic driver of adRP in a large Mexican family that exhibits nonpenetrance and variable expressivity, known properties of this locus. However, our studies intimate the presence of additional loci that can modify PRPF31 expression.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
  • Erica E. Davis · Stephan Frangakis · Nicholas Katsanis
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid advances and cost erosion in exome and genome analysis of patients with both rare and common genetic disorders has accelerated gene discovery and illuminated fundamental biological mechanisms. The thrill of discovery has been accompanied, however, with the sobering appreciation that human genomes are burdened with a large number of rare and ultra rare variants, thereby posing a significant challenge in dissecting both the effect of such alleles on protein function and the biological relevance of these events to patient pathology. In an effort to develop model systems that are able to generate surrogates of human pathologies, a powerful suite of tools have been developed in zebrafish, taking advantage of the relatively small (compared to invertebrate models) evolutionary distance of that genome to humans, the orthology of several organs and signaling processes, and the suitability of this organism for medium and high throughput phenotypic screening. Here we will review the use of this model organism in dissecting human genetic disorders; we will highlight how diverse strategies have informed disease causality and genetic architecture; and we will discuss relative strengths and limitations of these approaches in the context of medical genome sequencing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ciliopathies are characterized by a pattern of multisystem involvement that is consistent with the developmental role of the primary cilium. Within this biological module, mutations in genes that encode components of the cilium and its anchoring structure, the basal body, are the major contributors to both disease causality and modification. However, despite rapid advances in this field, the majority of the genes that drive ciliopathies and the mechanisms that govern the pronounced phenotypic variability of this group of disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we show that mutations in CSPP1, which encodes a core centrosomal protein, are disease causing on the basis of the independent identification of two homozygous truncating mutations in three consanguineous families (one Arab and two Hutterite) affected by variable ciliopathy phenotypes ranging from Joubert syndrome to the more severe Meckel-Gruber syndrome with perinatal lethality and occipital encephalocele. Consistent with the recently described role of CSPP1 in ciliogenesis, we show that mutant fibroblasts from one affected individual have severely impaired ciliogenesis with concomitant defects in sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling. Our results expand the list of centrosomal proteins implicated in human ciliopathies.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · The American Journal of Human Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rare single-gene disorders cause chronic disease. However, half of the 6000 recessive single gene causes of disease are still unknown. Because recessive disease genes can illuminate, at least in part, disease pathomechanism, their identification offers direct opportunities for improved clinical management and potentially treatment. Rare diseases comprise the majority of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children but are notoriously difficult to diagnose. Whole-exome resequencing facilitates identification of recessive disease genes. However, its utility is impeded by the large number of genetic variants detected. We here overcome this limitation by combining homozygosity mapping with whole-exome resequencing in 10 sib pairs with a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy, which represents the most frequent genetic cause of CKD in the first three decades of life. In 7 of 10 sibships with a histologic or ultrasonographic diagnosis of nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy, we detect the causative gene. In six sibships, we identify mutations of known nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy genes, while in two additional sibships we found mutations in the known CKD-causing genes SLC4A1 and AGXT as phenocopies of nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy. Thus, whole-exome resequencing establishes an efficient, noninvasive approach towards early detection and causation-based diagnosis of rare kidney diseases. This approach can be extended to other rare recessive disorders, thereby providing accurate diagnosis and facilitating the study of disease mechanisms.Kidney International advance online publication, 20 November 2013; doi:10.1038/ki.2013.450.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Kidney International
  • Source
    Dataset: ift172 supp

    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2013

Publication Stats

3k Citations
749.01 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • Indiana Blood and Marrow Transplantation
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
    • University of Liège
      • Unit of Animal Genomics
      Luik, Wallonia, Belgium
  • 2010-2015
    • Duke University
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Department of Cell Biology
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 2013
    • Baylor College of Medicine
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2006-2010
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States