Andrew D Pearle

Cornell University, Итак, New York, United States

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Publications (157)417.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Pivot-shift injury commonly results in combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)/medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury, yet the contribution of the components of the MCL complex to restraining multiplanar rotatory loads forming critical subcomponents of the pivot shift is not well understood. Purpose: To quantify the role of the MCL complex in restraining multiplanar rotatory loads. Study design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A robotic manipulator was used to apply combined valgus and internal rotation torques in a simplified model of the pivot-shift examination in 12 cadaveric knees (49 ± 11 years). Tibiofemoral kinematics were recorded with the ACL intact. Loads borne by the superficial MCL (sMCL), posterior oblique ligament (POL), deep MCL (dMCL), and ACL were determined via the principle of superposition. Results: The POL bore about 50% of the load carried by the ACL in response to the combined torques at 5° and 15° of flexion. The POL bore load during the internal rotation component of the combined torques, while the sMCL carried load during the valgus and internal rotation phases of the simulated pivot. Load in the dMCL was always <10% of the ACL in response to combined valgus and internal rotation torques. Conclusion: The POL provides complementary load bearing to the ACL near extension in response to combined torques, which capture key components of the pivot-shift examination. The sMCL resists the valgus component of the maneuver alone, a loading pattern unique from those of the POL and ACL. The dMCL is not loaded during clinical tests of rotational knee stability in the ACL-competent knee. Clinical relevance: Both the sMCL and POL work together with the ACL to resist combined moments, which form key components of the pivot-shift examination.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The American Journal of Sports Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Literature addressing the risks of barbed suture in arthroplasty remains limited. No study to our knowledge has compared rates of wound infection between barbed and conventional suture following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). We hypothesized that barbed suture would be associated with an increased risk of wound infection in patients undergoing UKA. Methods Electronic records were retrieved for 1040 UKA procedures. Odds ratios with postoperative wound infection as the outcome and barbed suture as the exposure were calculated. Binary logistic regression corrected for age, gender, body mass index, operative time and risk factors (smoking, diabetes, renal insufficiency and immunosuppression). Barbed suture consisted of Quill #2 PDO (or #0 Vicryl) for deep closure and Quill 2-0 Monoderm for subcuticular closure. Conventional suture consisted of #0 Vicryl for deep closure and subcuticular 2-0 Monocryl or staples for skin closure. Results A total of 839 procedures were included. Barbed suture was used in 333 surgeries and conventional suture was used in 506. Eight cases of postoperative wound infection were identified. All infections occurred in the barbed suture cohort. Regression analysis revealed an association between subcuticular barbed suture and postoperative wound infection (OR 22.818, CI 2.69 – 2923.91; p = 0.0074). Conclusions The findings indicate that the use of barbed suture in subcuticular layer closure is associated with an increased risk of wound infection. This may be exacerbated by early intensive mobilization, commonly undertaken after UKA to permit rapid functional return. We recommend against the use of barbed suture for subcuticular layer closure in UKA.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · The Journal of Arthroplasty
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: During anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, authors have suggested inserting the femoral tunnel at the biomechanically relevant direct fibres, but this higher position can cause more impingement. Therefore, we aimed to assess ACL graft impingement at the femoral notch for ACL reconstruction at both the direct and indirect tunnel positions. Methods: A virtual model was created for twelve cadaveric knees with computed tomography scanning in which a virtual graft was placed at direct and indirect tunnel positions of the anteromedial bundle (AM), posterolateral bundle (PL) or centre of the both bundles (C). In these six tunnel positions, the volume (mm3) and mid-point location of impingement (°) were measured at different flexion angles. Results: Generally, more impingement was seen with the indirect position compared with the direct position although this was only significant at 90° of flexion for the AM position (97 ± 28 vs. 76 ± 20 mm3, respectively; p = 0.046). The direct tunnel position impinged higher at the notch, whereas the indirect position impinged more towards the lateral wall, but this was only significant at 90° of flexion for the AM (24 ± 5° vs. 34 ± 4°, respectively; p < 0.001) and C position (34 ± 5° vs. 42 ± 5°, respectively; p = 0.003). Conclusion: In this cadaveric study, the direct tunnel position did not cause more impingement than the indirect tunnel position. Based on these results, graft impingement is not a limitation to reconstruct the femoral tunnel at the insertion of the biomechanically more relevant direct fibres.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Failure rates are higher in medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) than total knee arthroplasty. To improve these failure rates, it is important to understand why medial UKA fail. Because individual studies lack power to show failure modes, a systematic review was performed to assess medial UKA failure modes. Furthermore, we compared cohort studies with registry-based studies, early with midterm and late failures and fixed-bearing with mobile-bearing implants. Methods: Databases of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane and annual registries were searched for medial UKA failures. Studies were included when they reported >25 failures or when they reported early (<5 years), midterm (5-10 years), or late failures (>10 years). Results: Thirty-seven cohort studies (4 level II studies and 33 level III studies) and 2 registry-based studies were included. A total of 3967 overall failures, 388 time-dependent failures, and 1305 implant design failures were identified. Aseptic loosening (36%) and osteoarthritis (OA) progression (20%) were the most common failure modes. Aseptic loosening (26%) was most common early failure mode, whereas OA progression was more commonly seen in midterm and late failures (38% and 40%, respectively). Polyethylene wear (12%) and instability (12%) were more common in fixed-bearing implants, whereas pain (14%) and bearing dislocation (11%) were more common in mobile-bearing implants. Conclusion: This level III systematic review identified aseptic loosening and OA progression as the major failure modes. Aseptic loosening was the main failure mode in early years and mobile-bearing implants, whereas OA progression caused most failures in late years and fixed-bearing implants.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The Journal of Arthroplasty
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The predictive role of patient-specific characteristics and radiographic parameters on medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) outcomes is well known, but knowledge of these predictors is lacking in lateral UKA. Therefore, purpose of this study was to assess the predictive role of these parameters on short-term functional outcomes of lateral UKA. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index scores were collected at 2-year follow-up (median 2.2 years, range 2.0–4.0 years) in 39 patients who underwent lateral UKA. Patient-specific characteristics included age, BMI and gender, while radiographic parameters included osteoarthritis severity of all three compartments and both preoperative and postoperative hip-knee-ankle alignment. Results BMI, gender, age and preoperative valgus alignment were not correlated with functional outcomes, while postoperative valgus alignment was correlated with functional outcomes (0.561; p = 0.001). Postoperative valgus of 3°–7° was correlated with better outcomes than more neutral (−2° to 3° valgus) alignment (96.7 vs. 85.6; p = 0.011). Postoperative alignment was a predictor when corrected for patient-specific characteristics (regression coefficient 4.1; p < 0.001) and radiological parameters (regression coefficient 3.8; p = 0.002). Conclusions Postoperative valgus alignment of 3°–7° was correlated with the best short-term functional outcomes in lateral UKA surgery, while patient-specific parameters and preoperative alignment were not correlated with functional outcomes. Based on these findings, a surgeon should aim for valgus alignment of 3°–7° when performing lateral UKA surgery for optimal functional outcomes. Level of evidence Prognostic study, Level II.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Historically poor results of survivorship and functional outcomes of patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) have been reported in the setting of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. More recently, however, fairly good results of PFA were reported, but the current status of PFA outcomes is unknown. Therefore, a systematic review was performed to assess overall PFA survivorship and functional outcomes. Methods: A search was performed using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane systems, and the registries were searched. Twenty-three cohort studies and one registry reported survivorship using Kaplan-Meier curve, while 51 cohort studies reported functional outcomes of PFA. Results: Twelve studies were level II studies, while 45 studies were level III or IV studies. Heterogeneity was mainly seen in type of prosthesis and year the cohort started. Nine hundred revisions in 9619 PFAs were reported yielding 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-year PFA survivorships of 91.7, 83.3, 74.9 and 66.6 %, respectively, and an annual revision rate of 2.18. Functional outcomes were reported in 2587 PFAs with an overall score of 82.2 % of the maximum score. KSS and Knee Function Score were 87.5 and 81.6 %, respectively. Conclusion: This systematic review showed that fairly good results of PFA survivorship and functional outcomes were reported at short- and midterm follow-up in the setting of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Heterogeneity existed mainly in prosthesis design and year the cohort started. Clinical relevance: These results provide a clear overview of the current status of PFA in the setting of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Level of evidence: IV.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose During recent years, there has been an intensive growth of interest in the patient’s perception of functional outcome. The Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) is a recently introduced score that measures joint awareness of patients who have undergone knee arthroplasty and is less limited by ceiling effects. The aim of this study was to compare the FJS between patients who undergo medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA) 1 and 2 years post-operatively. Methods This prospective study compares the FJS at a minimum of one (average 1.5 years, range 1.0–1.9) and a minimum of 2 years (average 2.5 years, range 2.0–3.6) post-operatively between patients who underwent medial UKA and TKA. Results One-hundred and thirty patients were included. Sixty-five patients underwent medial UKA and 65 patients underwent TKA. At both follow-up points, the FJS was significantly higher in the UKA group (FJS 1 year 73.9 ± 22.8, FJS 2 year 74.3 ± 24.8) in contrast to the TKA group (FJS 1 year 59.3 ± 29.5 (p = 0.002), FJS 2 year 59.8 ± 31.5, (p = 0.004)). No significant improvement in the FJS was observed between 1- and 2-year follow-up of the two cohorts. Conclusion Patients who undergo UKA are more likely to forget their artificial joint in daily life and consequently may be more satisfied. Level of evidence II.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
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    J.P. van der List · L.S. McDonald · A.D. Pearle
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has gained popularity in patients with isolated unicompartmental osteoarthritis. To our knowledge no systematic review has assessed and compared survivorship of medial and lateral UKA. We performed a systematic review assessing medial and lateral UKA survivorship and comparing survivorship in cohort studies and registry-based studies. METHODS: A search was performed using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane systems. Ninety-six eligible studies reported survivorship, of which fifty-eight reported medial and sixteen reported lateral UKA survivorship. Nineteen cohort studies and seven registry-based studies reported combined medial and lateral survivorship. RESULTS: The five-year, ten-year and fifteen-year medial UKA survivorship was 93.9%, 91.7% and 88.9%, respectively. Lateral UKA survivorship was 93.2%, 91.4% and 89.4% at five-year, ten-year and fifteen-year, respectively. No statistical difference between both compartments was found. At twenty years and twenty-five years survivorship of medial UKA was 84.7% and 80%, respectively, but no studies reported lateral UKA survivorship at these follow-up intervals. Survivorship of cohort studies was not significantly higher compared to registry-based studies at five years (94.3 vs. 91.7, respectively, p=0.133) but was significantly higher at ten years (90.5 vs. 84.1, p=0.015). CONCLUSION: This is the first systematic review that shows no difference in the five-, ten- and fifteen-year survivorship of medial and lateral UKA. We found a lower survivorship in the registry-based studies compared to cohort studies. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Systematic Review of level IV studies.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · The Knee
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Biomechanical studies indicate that the tibia shifts medially and has a more valgus orientation in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee. However, it is not known whether these differences can be detected on standing radiographs. Purpose: To determine whether medial subluxation and more changes in coronal alignment of the tibia are detectable in both weightbearing radiographs and a cadaveric model simulating quiet standing. Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4, and Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Radiographic data were available for a cross-section of 74 patients with unilateral ACL tears. Tibial subluxation and coronal limb alignment were measured on hip-to-ankle weightbearing radiographs. Eight cadaveric knees were mounted on a 6 degree of freedom robot. Mediolateral position and varus-valgus alignment of the tibia relative to the femur were measured in response to 300-N axial compression simulating quiet standing at 5° and 15° of flexion with the ACL intact and sectioned. Results: Across all 74 patients included in the clinical study, the ACL-injured knee experienced 1.6 ± 2.3 mm (mean ± SD) of medial tibial subluxation compared with the contralateral uninjured knee (P < .001). The 24 patients with isolated ACL rupture exhibited 2.0 ± 1.8 mm of medial subluxation (P < .001). The mean coronal alignment of all 74 patients in the study was 0.7° ± 2.8° varus in the injured limb and 1.3° ± 2.6° varus in the uninjured contralateral limb (P = .0187). In the cadaveric model, the tibia translated 0.4 ± 0.5 mm more medially after sectioning of the ACL at 15° of flexion (P = .0485); however, no changes in coronal alignment were detected. Conclusion: The tibia shifts medially and is less varus in the ACL-deficient knee on standing radiographs. The medial tibial shift is reproduced in an axially loaded cadaveric model. Clinical relevance: Medial tibiofemoral subluxation seen on frontal plane standing radiograph is an underappreciated sequela of isolated ACL rupture. The ability of ACL reconstruction to restore this aspect of ACL injury is not well understood and should be investigated further. Cadaveric models may be used to directly measure the mechanical effect of subtle changes in mediolateral position on articular contact stress as an indicator of the importance of this finding.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · The American Journal of Sports Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze knees in varying stages of osteoarthritis (OA) for the presence of coronal tibiofemoral (CTF) subluxation and to determine if CTF subluxation severity is related to knee OA worsening. We retrospectively evaluated CTF subluxation and limb alignment in 113 patients with different stages of knee OA who were being considered for an arthroplasty procedure. Knee OA was classified as "mild" or "severe" according to Kellgren-Lawrence scale. CTF subluxation was measured in the study groups and in 40 knees of healthy controls using software developed specifically on the basis of Iterative Closest Point mathematical algorithm. Mean CTF subluxation in "mild OA" and "severe OA" groups was 3.5 % (±2) and 3.5 % (±5) of the tibial plateau, respectively. For both the mild and severe OA groups, CTF subluxation was significantly increased compared to the 1.4 % (±1) CTF subluxation in the control group, (p < 0.0001) and (p = 0.012), respectively. However, there was no significant difference in CTF subluxation between the mild OA and severe OA groups (p = 0.75). Limb varus malalignment in mild OA and severe OA groups was 3.6° (±2.2) and 5.3° (±2.6), respectively. Both significantly increased comparing to the 1° (±0.7) control group alignment (p < 0.0001). Varus malalignment in the severe OA group was significantly increased comparing to the mild OA group (p = 0.0003). CTF subluxation is a radiographic finding related to knee OA which occurs mainly in the early stages of the osteoarthritic process and stagnates as OA progresses.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Skeletal Radiology
  • Kaitlin M Carroll · Andrew D Pearle

    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
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    Andrew D Pearle · David McAllister · Stephen M Howell

    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare an open freehand mosaicplasty technique with an arthroscopic technique for the treatment of osteochondral lesions by measuring the instrument deviation, quantifying this deviation, and providing numerical information on the difference in the outcomes of these techniques. Methods: Four cadaveric knees were used. Reference markers were attached to the femur, tibia, and donor/recipient site guides. A total of 10 osteochondral grafts were harvested and inserted into recipient sites arthroscopically and 10 similar grafts were inserted freehand. The angles of graft removal and placement were calculated for each of the surgical groups compared. Ostensibly, a navigation system was used as an aid, to measure the graft placement parameters. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between the arthroscopic method and the freehand method regarding the angle of graft removal at the donor site (P = .162), recipient site plug removal angle (P = .731), and recipient site graft placement angle (P = .630). In the freehand group, the mean angle of graft removal at the donor site was 12 degrees, the mean angle of recipient site plug removal was 10.7 degrees, and the mean angle of recipient site plug placement was 10.6 degrees. Using the arthroscopic technique, the mean angle of graft removal at the donor site was 17.14 degrees, the mean angle of recipient site plug removal was 12.0 degrees, and the mean angle of recipient site graft placement was 10.14 degrees. Conclusions: Our study revealed there was no statistically significant difference regarding precision and accuracy during harvesting, recipient site preparation, and plug placement between the 2 techniques.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose was to determine the effect of medial fixed bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) on postoperative patellofemoral joint (PFJ) congruence and analyze the relationship of preoperative PFJ degeneration on clinical outcome. We retrospectively reviewed 110 patients (113 knees) who underwent medial UKA. Radiographs were evaluated to ascertain PFJ degenerative changes and congruence. Clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively. The postoperative absolute patellar congruence angle (10.05±10.28) was significantly improved compared with the preoperative value (14.23±11.22) (P=0.0038). No correlation was found between preoperative PFJ congruence or degeneration severity, and WOMAC scores at two-year follow up. Pre-operative PFJ congruence and degenerative changes do not affect UKA clinical outcomes. This finding may be explained by the post-op PFJ congruence improvement. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · The Journal of Arthroplasty
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    ABSTRACT: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is a well established method for the treatment of single compartment arthritis; however, a subset of patients still present with continued pain after their procedure in the setting of a normal radiographic examination. This study investigates the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in guiding the diagnosis of the painful unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. An IRB-approved retrospective review identified 300 consecutive UKAs performed over a three years period with 28 cases of symptomatic UKA (nine percent) with normal radiographic images. MRI examination was instrumental in finding a diagnosis that went undetected on radiographs. Based on MRI findings, 10 (36%) patients underwent surgery whilst 18 (64%) were treated conservatively. This study supports the use of MRI as a valuable imaging modality for managing symptomatic unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Case series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · The Knee
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    ABSTRACT: Medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is a procedure designed for resurfacing the medial compartment in isolated medial compartment degenerative joint disease. Many long-term studies have reported the success of UKA. Despite recent interest and isolated reports of success, significant issues still exist today with early failure in UKA. Medial UKA is a promising alternative to TKA for isolated medial compartment DJD. Potential advantages of this treatment option compared to TKA include improved patient satisfaction, more consistent return to sporting activities, quicker recovery, decreased complication risk, and greater range of motion. With the introduction of robotic arm tools to help improve accuracy and reliability of implant position we may be able to decrease failure rates in UKAs. In addition, cementless technologies are promising approaches to improve the durability of UKA fixation. Robotic arm techniques coupled with cementless fixation strategies may dramatically reduce the incidence of aseptic loosening in UKA.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Operative Techniques in Orthopaedics
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    ABSTRACT: Limb alignment after unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) has a significant impact on outcomes. The literature lacks lateral UKA alignment studies, making our understanding of this issue based on medial UKA. We evaluated limb alignment in 241 patients who underwent medial (229 knees) or lateral (37 knees) UKA. Alignment was measured pre and postoperatively in radiographs and intra-operatively using a navigation system. We compared the percentage of over-correction and the difference between post-operative alignment and navigation measurement. Percentage of overcorrection was significantly higher in the lateral UKAs (11%) compared to the medial UKAs (4%). In medial UKAs, the mean difference between the intraoperative alignment and the post-operative was 1.33°. This was significantly lower than the mean 1.86° difference in the lateral UKAs. Our data demonstrated an increased risk of "overcorrection," and greater difficulty in predicting postoperative alignment using computer navigation, when performing lateral UKAs compared to medial UKAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · The Knee
  • Hassan M Ghomrawi · Ashley A Eggman · Andrew D Pearle
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    ABSTRACT: Trade-offs between upfront benefits and later risk of revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty compared with those of total knee arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of our study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty with that of total knee arthroplasty across the age spectrum of patients undergoing knee replacement. Using a Markov decision analytic model, we compared unicompartmental knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty with regard to lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from a societal perspective for patients undergoing surgery at forty-five, fifty-five, sixty-five, seventy-five, or eighty-five years of age. Transition probabilities were estimated from the literature; survival, from the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register; and costs, from the literature and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) database. Costs and QALYs were discounted at 3.0% annually. We conducted sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of model estimates and threshold analyses. For patients sixty-five years of age and older, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty dominated total knee arthroplasty, with lower lifetime costs and higher QALYs. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was no longer cost-effective at a $100,000/QALY threshold when total knee arthroplasty rehabilitation costs were reduced by two-thirds or more for these older patients. Lifetime societal savings from utilizing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in all older patients (sixty-five or older) in 2015 and 2020 were $56 to $336 million and $84 to $544 million, respectively. In the forty-five and fifty-five-year-old age cohorts, total knee arthroplasty had an ICER of $30,300/QALY and $63,000/QALY, respectively. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty became cost-effective when its twenty-year revision rate dropped from 27.8% to 25.7% for the forty-five-year age group and from 27.9% to 26.7% for the fifty-five-year age group. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty is an economically attractive alternative in patients sixty-five years of age or older, and modest improvements in implant survivorship could make it a cost-effective alternative in younger patients. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to (1) investigate the rate of return to play among Major League Baseball (MLB) athletes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), (2) determine the impact of ACL injury on ability to perform baseball-specific planting and pivoting tasks (batting and stealing bases), and (3) to explore the effect of the injured side on these metrics. ACL injury data from 1999 to 2012 were compiled, along with player performance statistics recorded for players with at least 30 games before ACL injury. Predictor variables included side of injury and outcome variables focused on batting average, stolen bases, and number of times caught stealing before injury and after surgery. Twenty-three of 26 (88%) players were able to return to at least 30 games after ACLR, although they experienced a decline of 21.2% in number of games played (P = .004). Those who had a ACLR for a rear batting leg injury averaged a 12.3% decline in batting average, whereas those who had ACLR for a lead leg injury had a 6.4% increase in batting average (P = .04). Side of injury was not predictive of stolen base metrics. The overall rate of return to play among MLB position players after ACLR was 88%, although there was a 21.2% decline in the number of games played postoperatively. Injury to the rear batting leg resulted in a lower returning batting average compared with an injury to the lead batting leg. Side of injury had no effect on stolen bases or on the number of times a player was caught stealing. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an increasingly popular option for the treatment of single-compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) in adults. Two options for tibial resurfacing during UKA are (1) all-polyethylene inlays and (2) metal-backed onlays. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any differences in clinical outcomes with inlay versus onlay tibial components. We identified 39 inlays and 45 onlays, with average 2.7- and 2.3-year follow-up, respectively, from a prospective robotic-assisted surgery database. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster University Arthritis Index (WOMAC), subcategorized by the pain, stiffness, and function subscores, at 2 years postoperatively. The secondary outcome was the need for secondary or revision surgery. Postoperative WOMAC pain score was 3.1 for inlays and 1.6 for onlays (p = 0.03). For 25 inlays and 30 onlays with both preoperative and postoperative WOMAC data, pain score improved from 8.3 to 4.0 for inlays versus from 9.2 to 1.7 for onlays (p = 0.01). Function score improved from 27.5 to 12.5 for inlays versus from 32.1 to 7.3 for onlays (p = 0.03). Four inlays and one onlay required a secondary or revision procedure (p = 0.18). We advise using metal-backed onlays during UKA to improve postoperative clinical outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · HSS Journal

Publication Stats

3k Citations
417.30 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2015
    • Cornell University
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Итак, New York, United States
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2009-2015
    • Weill Cornell Medical College
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2002-2015
    • Hospital for Special Surgery
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2011
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      San Francisco, California, United States
    • Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2008
    • Gracie Square Hospital, New York, NY
      New York City, New York, United States