Yasir Hasan Siddique

Aligarh Muslim University, Koil, Uttar Pradesh, India

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Publications (124)108.93 Total impact

  • Yasir Hasan Siddique · Fahad Ali · Jurg Bahler

    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
  • Falaq Naz · Smita Jyoti · Rahul · Nishat Akhtar · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: The continuous use of synthetic hormones as contraceptive pill or hormonal replacement therapy among women is increasing day by day. The widespread use of different formulations as oral contraceptives by women throughout their reproductive cycle has given rise to a serious concern for studying the effects of oral contraceptives on enzymatic profile and DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among users. The present study was carried out on women taking oral contraceptives. The study was based on the questionnaire having the information of reproductive history, fasting, age, health, nature of menstrual cycle, bleeding and other disease. The profile of the blood serum enzymes i.e. alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aminotransferases (SGOT and SGPT), serum proteins (albumin and globulin) and DNA damage in lymphocytes was studied among users and non-users. The results of the present study suggest that OCs not only effects enzymatic activity but also results in DNA damage that may vary with the duration of using oral contraceptives. A significant increase in LDH, GGT, SGPT, SGOT, globulin and decrease in ALP as well as albumin was found among users as compared to non-users. The observed DNA damage was more in users as compared to non-users. Hormonal contraceptives seem to exert DNA damage and also have significant effects on blood serum enzymes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of bromocriptine alginate nanocomposite (BANC) was studied on Parkinson's disease (PD) model flies. The synthesized BANC was subject to characterization and at final concentration of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5µM was mixed in diet. The PD flies were allowed to feed on it for 24 days. A significant dose dependent delay in the loss of climbing activity and activity pattern was observed in the PD flies exposed to 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5µM BANC. The PD flies exposed to BANC also showed a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S- transferase activity and an increase in glutathione content. However, no gross morphological changes were observed in the brains of PD and control flies. The results suggest that BANC is effective in reducing the PD symptoms in transgenic flies.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Disease Models and Mechanisms
  • Mohd Danish · Ambreen Fatima · Saba Khanam · Smita Jyoti · Rahul · Fahad Ali · Falaq Naz · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study the toxic potential of calcium carbide (CaC2) was studied on the third instar larvae of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ)Bg(9). The third instar larvae were exposed to 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32×10(-3)g/ml of CaC2 in diet for 24h. The results reveal that the dose 2×10(-3)g/ml was not toxic but the remaining doses showed a dose dependent significant increase in the hsp70 expression, β-galactosidase activity, tissue damage, oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content), glutathione-S-transferase activity, expression of Caspase 3 and 9, apoptotic index and DNA damage (midgut cells). A significant reduction as compared to control group in total protein, glutathione content and acetylcholinesterase activity was also observed. The Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy analysis (ICPAES) reveals the presence of copper, iron, sodium, aluminium, manganese, calcium, nickel and mercury. The toxic effects of CaC2 in the present study may be attributed to the impurities present in it.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Chemosphere
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, copper-doped ZnO nanoparticles (doped ZnO NPs Cu) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their possible toxic effects in Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R). X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry confirm the formation of doped ZnO NPs Cu. Doped ZnO NPs Cu (3%) were mixed in the diet at final concentrations of 1, 2, 4 and 8 µg/µl. The starved male flies were allowed to feed on it for 4 days. After completion of the desired duration, climbing ability, activity pattern, activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), lipid peroxidation (LPO), total protein content and caspases were studied. SDS-PAGE was also performed for whole fly homogenate of control as well as treated flies. No loss in the climbing and activity pattern was observed at the selected doses of doped ZnO NPs Cu. No significant change in the levels of AChE, GSH, GST, LPO, caspase 9/3 and total protein content was observed. The brain sections showed no gross changes in the structure and SDS-PAGE patterns also revealed no change in the protein expression. The results suggest that doped ZnO NPs Cu are non-toxic at 1, 2, 4 and 8 µg/µl of concentration in D. melanogaster.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Toxicology mechanisms and methods
  • Rahul Sachdev · Smita Jyoti · Falaq Naz · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was carried out to evaluate the toxic potential of cefotaxime in the third instar larvae of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ)Bg(9). Cefotaxime at final concentration of 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80μg/ml was mixed in the diet and the larvae were exposed to the selected doses for 6, 12, 24, 48 hrs. The hsp70 expression, trypan blue exclusion test, in situ histochemical β-galactosidase activity, lipid peroxidation, total protein content, glutathione (GSH) content, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, protein carbonyl content, caspase 3 and 9 activity, apoptotic index and comet assay were taken as parameters for the study. The larvae exposed to 40, 60 and 80μg/ml for 12, 24 and 48 hrs showed a dose and duration dependent significant increase in the activity of β-galactosidase and lipid peroxidation but decrease in the total GSH content as compared to unexposed larvae. The decrease in protein content was observed in the larvae exposed to 40, 60 and 80μg/ml of cefotaxime for 24 and 48 hrs. The larvae exposed to 40, 60 and 80μg/ml of cefotaxime for 24 and 48 hrs showed a dose and duration dependent increase in the tissue damage, GST, caspase 3 and 9 activity, PC content, apoptosis and the DNA tail length (Comet assay). The result suggests that the cefotaxime is toxic at 40, 60 and 80μg/ml of doses for the third instar larvae of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ)Bg(9). Cefotaxime at 10 and 20 μg/ml was not toxic for any duration of exposure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Chemico-Biological Interactions
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    ABSTRACT: The present study objective is to find out the effectiveness of the polyphyto oil preparation applied transcranially screening for its learning and memory activity. Trans Cranial Routes was stated that the passage of an oil solubilized drug moiety across the skin of the scalp, including appendages of the skin such as sebaceous glands, walls of the hair follicles and sweat glands, through the cranial bones along with the diploe, the cranial bone sutures, and the meninges and specifically through the emissary veins into the brain. The transcranially applied test drugs FMTc compose of Asparagus racemosus (20%) Phyllanthus emblica (10%), Lactuca sativa (35%), Curcuma longa (35%) at a dose of (10 mg/ kg body weight) studied against standard drug Bacopa monnieri (50 mg/kg p.o and TCR) having potential effect to improving memory, evaluate it using three different animal model like Elevated plus maze (EPM), Morris water maze (MWM) and Pole Climbing apparatus (PCA) for the effect of nootropic action. It was concluded that the nootropic polyphyto oil preparation FMTc having promising significant (p<0.001) effect for enhancing learning and memory properties can be use for memory loss or dementia and prophylactically can be use to prevent neurodegeneration.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Feb 2015
  • Smita Jyoti · Yasir Hasan Siddique · Saif Khan · Falaq Naz · Rahul · Fahad Ali
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Gutkha and pan masala addiction among humans of different occupations is very common. The increase in the occurrence of oral cancer has raised a serious concern regarding the nature of these chewables. Study design: In the present study, the effect of pan masala and gutkha was studied on micronucleus frequency and comet tail length in the buccal epithelial cells taking into consideration the duration of keeping the chewables (gutkha and pan masala) in mouth, duration of addiction, and the number of pouches of the chewables (gutkha and pan masala) consumed per day. Results: The results of the present study reveal that the micronucleus frequency and comet tail length in buccal epithelial cells are higher in gutkha users as compared to pan masala users and also to controls. Conclusion: The micronucleus frequency and comet tail length also depend on the duration of chewables kept in mouth, duration of addiction and the number of pouches consumed per day.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · International Journal of Oral Science
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    ABSTRACT: The role of Centella asiatica L. leaf extract was studied on the transgenic Drosophila model flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h-αS) in the neurons. The leaf extract was prepared in acetone and was subjected to GC-MS analysis. C. asiatica extract at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μL/mL was mixed with the diet and the flies were allowed feeding on it for 24 days. The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, activity pattern, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione content, and glutathione-S-transferase activity in the brains of transgenic Drosophila. The exposure of extract to PD model flies results in a significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and activity pattern and reduced the oxidative stress ( P < 0.05 ) in the brains of PD flies as compared to untreated PD flies. The results suggest that C. asiatica leaf extract is potent in reducing the PD symptoms in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson’s disease.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Parkinson's Disease
  • Smita Jyoti · Falaq Naz · Rahul · Saif Khan · Fahad Ali · Ambreen Fatima · Saba Khanam · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: Chewing of betel quid, smoking and alcohol consumption are all associated with higher incidences of oral cancer. Genetic damage can be detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using human centromeric probes. In the present study FISH was performed on buccal epithelial cells of pan masala and gutkha chewers alone with and without additional tobacco smoking and/or alcohol consumption. The study comprised of 1500 male individuals. The present study found the highest frequency of micronuclei without a centromeric region (MN(-)) among gutkha users who also smoked and drank (P < 0.05). A significant increase in cells having micronuclei with a centromeric region (MN(+)) was observed among pan masala users who also smoked (P < 0.05). The study reveals that the clastogenic effects of pan masala/gutkha increase with smoking and alcohol consumption, but aneugenic effects were also observed among the pan masala chewers who smoked. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Mutagenesis
  • Yasir Hasan Siddique · Mohammad Faisal · Falaq Naz · Smita Jyoti · Rahul
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To evaluate the effect of Ocimum sanctum leaf extract on the dietary supplementation in the transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease. Method: The effect of Ocimum sanctum leaf extract was studied on the transgenic Drosophila model of flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h-αs) in the neurons. O. sanctum extract at final concentrations of 0.042 8 × 10(-4), 0.87 × 10(-4), and 1.85 × 10(-4) g·mL(-1) of diet were established and the flies were allowed to feed for 21 days. The climbing assay and lipid peroxidation were taken as parameters for the study. Results: The supplementation of O. sanctum extract showed a dose-dependent significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and reduction in oxidative stress in the brain of PD model flies. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the O. sanctum extract is potent in reducing the PD symptoms in transgenic Drosophila model.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Chinese Journal of Natural Medicines
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    Fahad Ali · Rahul · Falaq Naz · Smita Jyoti · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: A number of pharmacological properties have been attributed to apigenin. In the present study the effect of apigenin was investigated with respect to hepatotoxicity induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), a compound that is present in many food stuffs and has been reported to be a hepatocarcinogen. Male rats were exposed to NDEA (0.1 mg/ml) dissolved in drinking-water separately, and with 10, 20, or 40 mg/ml of apigenin for 21 days. The activity of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was measured in blood serum. Lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and micronucleus frequency were determined in hepatocytes. To assess the effect on DNA damage, the comet assay was performed on hepatocytes, blood lymphocytes and bone-marrow cells of the exposed rats. The results of the study reveal that the treatment of NDEA together with apigenin showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the serum concentration of the enzymes SGOT, SGPT, ALP and LDH (p < 0.05). Histological sections of the liver also showed a protective effect of apigenin. A significant dose-dependent reduction in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content was observed in rats exposed to NDEA (0.1 mg/ml) together with apigenin (p < 0.05). The results obtained for the comet assay in rat hepatocytes, blood lymphocytes and bone-marrow cells showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the mean tail length (p < 0.05). The present study supports the role of apigenin as an anti-genotoxic and hepatoprotective agent.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
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    Yasir Hasan Siddique · Wasi Khan · Saba Khanam · Smita Jyoti · Falaq Naz · Rahul · Braj Raj Singh · Alim H Naqvi
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study the graphene zinc oxide nanocomposite (GZNC) was synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for its toxic potential on third instar larvae of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ)Bg 9. The synthesized GZNC was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The GZNC in 0.1% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) was sonicated for 10 minutes and the final concentrations 0.033, 0.099, 0.199, and 3.996 μg/μL of diet were established. The third instar larvae were allowed to feed on it separately for 24 and 48 hr. The hsp70 expression was measured by o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside assay, tissue damage was measured by trypan blue exclusion test, and β-galactosidase activity was monitored by in situ histochemical β-galactosidase staining. Oxidative stress was monitored by performing lipid peroxidation assay and total protein estimation. Ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining was performed on midgut cells for apoptotic index and the comet assay was performed for the DNA damage. The results of the present study showed that the exposure of 0.199 and 3.996 μg/μL of GZNC was toxic for both 24 hr and 48 hr of exposure. The doses of 0.033 μg/μL and 0.099 of GZNC showed no toxic effects on its exposure to the third instar larvae for 24 hr as well as 48 hr of duration.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · BioMed Research International
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The Drosophila model for Parkinson_s Disease (PD) based on wild-type alpha synuclein expression in flies were used in this study. A time dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons and the formation of intracellular aggregates of >S (Lewy bodies) have been reported in the PD model flies. The effect of apigenin, an antioxidant found in most vegetables and fruits, was studied on the life span and activity pattern of the PD model flies. Methods: Flies were maintained on standard Drosophila food at 25-C. Crosses were set up using six virgin UAS-Hsap/SNCA.F5B females mated to three GAL4elav males. The progeny expressing human >-synuclein (PD flies) were exposed to 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 Kl/ml of apigenin mixed in the diet. Hsap/SNCA.F strains were used as controls. To determine lifespan, the newly enclosed male flies (control and PD) were placed in culture tubes (10 flies per tube) containing 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Kl/ml of apigenin mixed in diet. Flies were transferred to new diet every 3 days and the numbers of dead flies were recorded at 3 days intervals until all flies had died. Motor activity was monitored by using Drosophila activity monitors (DAMs) starting on the 12th day. Activity was recorded every hour for a total of 280 hrs. Results: The results obtained for lifespan determination showed that apigenin extended the average lifespan of the male PD flies. A dose dependent delay in the loss of activity pattern was observed in PD flies exposed to 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Kl/ml of apigenin. No change was observed in the activity pattern of control flies. Conclusion: Apigenin is potent in reducing PD symptoms in the Drosophila model for PD.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
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    Siddique YH · Tanveer Beg · Falaq Naz · Smita Jyoti
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    ABSTRACT: Background: There are various genetic models of PD based on alphasynuclein (>S) expression (mutant, or wild type) in mice as well as in flies. The over expression of either wild type or mutant form of >S in transgenic Drosophila leads to the formation of Lewy Bodies (LB) resulting in the loss of dopaminergic neurons and behavioral abnormality. Plants having medicinal properties have gained importance because of their beneficial effect on humans. In this context the effect of Salvadora persica leaf extract was studied on the transgenic Drosophila (Parkinson_s disease) model flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h->S) in the neurons. Methods: The leaf extract was prepared in acetone. The flies were cultured on standard Drosophila food at 25-C. Crosses were set up using six virgin females of UAS-Hsap/SNCA.F5B were mated to three males of GAL4elav. The progeny expressing the human >-synuclein (PD flies) were exposed to 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Kl/ml of S. persica mixed in the diet for 24 days. Hsap/ SNCA.F strains were taken as control. The effect of extract was studied on the climbing ability, behavioral pattern, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain of PD model flies. Results: The exposure of flies to 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 Kl/ml showed a dose dependent significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and activity pattern, reduction in the oxidative stress and apoptosis in PD model flies. Conclusion: S. persica leaf extract is potent in reducing PD symptoms.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Oxidative stress is thought to be mechanistically involved in PD pathogenesis. Gingerol is a component of ginger and may have antioxidant properties. We studied the effects of gingerol supplementation on oxidative stress in Parkinson_s disease (PD) model flies. Methods: Drosophila expressing human alpha-synuclein (PD flies) were exposed to 50, 100 and 150KM of gingerol mixed in the diet for 24 days. To measure lipid peroxidation, brain homogenates (10 brains/group; five replicates/group) were prepared in Tris HCl (20 mM), mixed with 1- methyl-2-phenylindole, acetonitrile, methanol and HCl, and incubated at 45-C for 40 min prior to absorbance measurements at 586 nm. The protein carbonyl content was estimated according to the protocol described by Hawkins et al. (2009). Homogenates were mixed with 2, 4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine and incubated for 20 min followed by addition of trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Following incubation at -20-C for 15 min, mixtures were centrifuged and the pellet obtained was washed twice by ice cold ethanol:ethylacetate (1:1). Pellets were re-dissolved in guanidine hydrochloride and the absorbance was read at 370 nm. Results: Gingerol supplementation resulted in a dose dependent significant decrease in lipid peroxidation ranging from a 30% decrease at 50 KM gingerol to a 59% decrease at 150 KM gingerol (pG0.05). Gingerol supplementation also resulted in a dose dependent significant decrease in protein carbonyl content ranging from a 17% decrease at 50 KM gingerol to a 28% decrease at 150 KM gingerol (pG0.05). Conclusion: Gingerol is potent in reducing the oxidative stress in the brains of PD model flies. Gingerol should be validated in mammalian model systems before use as a potential therapy for PD in humans.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
  • Yasir Hasan Siddique · Syed Faiz Mujtaba · Mohammad Faisal · Smita Jyoti · Falaq Naz
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The effect of Bacopa monnieri leaf extract was studied on transgenic Drosophila (Parkinson's disease) model flies which expressed normal human alpha synuclein (h-αS) in their neurons. A time dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons and the formation of intracellular aggregates of αS (Lewy bodies) has been reported in the PD model flies. Methods B. monnieri leaf extract, prepared in acetone was subjected to GC-MS analysis. Diets with final concentrations of 0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 μl/ml were established and the flies were allowed to feed on for 24 days. The effect of the extracts was studied on the climbing ability, activity pattern, oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content) and apoptosis in the brain of PD model flies. Results The exposure of PD flies to 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 μl/ml showed a dose dependent significant delay in the loss of climbing ability as well as activity pattern, reduced the oxidative stress and apoptosis compared to untreated PD flies. Conclusion B. monnieri leaf extract improves behavioral abnormalities, reduces the oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brains of PD model flies.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · European Journal of Integrative Medicine
  • Yasir Hasan Siddique · Smita Jyoti · Falaq Naz
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and aggregation of alpha synuclein (αS) in the brain. The role of epicatechin gallate (EG) was studied on the transgenic Drosophila model of flies expressing normal human alpha synuclein (h-αS) in the neurons. The objectives of the present work include the study of the effect of EG on the climbing ability, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis in the brain of PD model flies. These flies exhibit locomotor dysfunction as the age progresses. EG at final concentration of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μg/mL was supplemented in diet and flies were allowed to feed for 24 days. The climbing ability was assessed after 24 days. The supplementation of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 μg/mL of EG showed a dose-dependent significant delay in the loss of climbing ability and reduced the oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain of PD model flies.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Dietary Supplements
  • Rahul · Smita Jyoti · Falaq Naz · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic and is used to treat various Gram negative bacteria. Due to its thermal stability it is useful for the preparation of culture media for various cell lines and microorganisms. It has been reported as ototoxic and nephrotoxic in adult humans. In the present study the toxic effects of gentamicin were studied in the third instar larvae of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ)Bg9. The third instar larvae were exposed to a wide range of doses, i.e. 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 μg ml−1 of gentamicin for 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. The exposure of larvae to the above doses for 6 and 12 hours did not show any toxic effects. The exposure of larvae to 80, 90 and 100 μg ml−1 of gentamicin for 24 hours and 70, 80, 90 and 100 μg ml−1 of gentamicin for 48 hours showed a dose-dependent toxic effect. The dose of 60 μg ml−1 did not show any toxic effects and hence can be suggested as the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL). The results suggest that gentamicin is toxic at higher doses and longer duration of exposure.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Toxicology Research
  • Fahad Ali · Rahul · Falaq Naz · Smita Jyoti · Yasir Hasan Siddique
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    ABSTRACT: A number of pharmacological properties have been attributed to apigenin. In the present study the effect of apigenin was investigated with respect to hepatotoxicity induced by N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), a compound that is present in many food stuffs and has been reported to be a hepatocarcinogen. Male rats were exposed to NDEA (0.1mg/ml) dissolved in drinking-water separately, and with 10, 20, or 40mg/ml of apigenin for 21 days. The activity of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was measured in blood serum. Lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and micronucleus frequency were determined in hepatocytes. To assess the effect on DNA damage, the comet assay was performed on hepatocytes, blood lymphocytes and bone-marrow cells of the exposed rats. The results of the study reveal that the treatment of NDEA together with apigenin showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the serum concentration of the enzymes SGOT, SGPT, ALP and LDH (p<0.05). Histological sections of the liver also showed a protective effect of apigenin. A significant dose-dependent reduction in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content was observed in rats exposed to NDEA (0.1mg/ml) together with apigenin (p<0.05). The results obtained for the comet assay in rat hepatocytes, blood lymphocytes and bone-marrow cells showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the mean tail length (p<0.05). The present study supports the role of apigenin as an anti-genotoxic and hepatoprotective agent.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis