Daoxin Xie

Tsinghua University, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (58)327.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Plants initiate leaf senescence to relocate nutrients and energy from aging leaves to developing tissues or storage organs for growth, reproduction, and defense. Leaf senescence, the final stage of leaf development, is regulated by various environmental stresses, developmental cues, and endogenous hormone signals. Jasmonate (JA), a lipid-derived phytohormone essential for plant defense and plant development, serves as an important endogenous signal to activate senescence-associated gene expression and induce leaf senescence. This study revealed one of the mechanisms underlying JA-induced leaf senescence: antagonistic interactions of the bHLH subgroup IIIe factors MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 with the bHLH subgroup IIId factors bHLH03, bHLH13, bHLH14, and bHLH17. We showed that MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 function redundantly to activate JA-induced leaf senescence. MYC2 binds to and activates the promoter of its target gene SAG29 (SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE29) to activate JA-induced leaf senescence. Interestingly, plants have evolved an elaborate feedback regulation mechanism to modulate JA-induced leaf senescence: The bHLH subgroup IIId factors (bHLH03, bHLH13, bHLH14, and bHLH17) bind to the promoter of SAG29 and repress its expression to attenuate MYC2/MYC3/MYC4-activated JA-induced leaf senescence. The antagonistic regulation by activators and repressors would mediate JA-induced leaf senescence at proper level suitable for plant survival in fluctuating environmental conditions. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · The Plant Cell
  • Chun Yan · Daoxin Xie
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    ABSTRACT: Plants and their biotic enemies, such as microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects, are engaged in a desperate battle which would determine their survival-death fate. Plants have evolved efficient and sophisticated systems to defend against such attackers. In recent years, significant progress has been made towards a comprehensive understanding of inducible defence system mediated by jasmonate (JA), a vital plant hormone essential for plant defence responses and developmental processes. This review presents an overview of JA action in plant defences and discusses how microbial pathogens evade plant defence system through hijacking the JA pathway. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Plant Biotechnology Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Plant architecture, a complex of the important agronomic traits that determine grain yield, is a primary target of artificial selection of rice domestication and improvement. Some important genes affecting plant architecture and grain yield have been isolated and characterized in recent decades; however, their underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we report genetic identification and functional analysis of the PLANT ARCHITECTURE AND YIELD 1 (PAY1) gene in rice, which affects plant architecture and grain yield in rice. Transgenic plants over-expressing PAY1 had twice the number of grains per panicle and consequently produced nearly 38% more grain yield per plant than control plants. Mechanistically, PAY1 could improve plant architecture via affecting polar auxin transport activity and altering endogenous indole-3-acetic acid distribution. Furthermore, introgression of PAY1 into elite rice cultivars, using marker-assisted background selection, dramatically increased grain yield compared with the recipient parents. Overall, these results demonstrated that PAY1 could be a new beneficial genetic resource for shaping ideal plant architecture and breeding high-yielding rice varieties. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · The Plant Journal
  • Tiancong Qi · Huang Huang · Susheng Song · Daoxin Xie
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    ABSTRACT: Stamens are the plant male reproductive organs essential for plant fertility. Proper development of stamens is modulated by environmental cues and endogenous hormone signals. Deficiencies in biosynthesis or perception of the phytohormone jasmonate (JA) attenuate stamen development, disrupt male fertility, and abolish seed production in Arabidopsis thaliana. This study revealed that JA-mediated stamen development and seed production are regulated by a bHLH-MYB complex. The IIIe basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor MYC5 acts as a target of JAZ repressors to function redundantly with other IIIe bHLH factors such as MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 in the regulation of stamen development and seed production. The myc2 myc3 myc4 myc5 quadruple mutant exhibits obvious defects in stamen development and significant reduction in seed production. Moreover, these IIIe bHLH factors interact with the MYB transcription factors MYB21 and MYB24 to form a bHLH-MYB transcription complex and cooperatively regulate stamen development. We speculate that the JAZ proteins repress the bHLH-MYB complex to suppress stamen development and seed production, while JA induces JAZ degradation and releases the bHLH-MYB complex to subsequently activate the expression of downstream genes essential for stamen development and seed production. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · The Plant Cell
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    ABSTRACT: Nitrogen (N), the most important mineral nutrient for plants, is critical to agricultural production systems. N deficiency could severely affect rice growth and decrease rice yields. However, the excessive use of N fertilizer has caused severe pollution to the agricultural and ecological environments. Breeding crops that require less input of N fertilizer has been recognized in the call for a ‘Second Green Revolution’. Here we identified a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 12, Tolerance Of Nitrogen Deficiency 1 (TOND1), which confers tolerance to N deficiency of rice in the indica cultivar Teqing. Sequence verification of 150 rice cultivars (75 indica and 75 japonica cultivars) from 18 countries and regions demonstrates that only 27.3% cultivars (41 indica cultivars) contain TOND1 whereas 72.7% cultivars, including the remaining 34 indica cultivars and all 75 japonica cultivars, have not harbored the TOND1 allele. Over-expression of TOND1 has increased the tolerance to N deficiency in the TOND1-deficient rice cultivars. The identification of TOND1 provides a molecular basis for breeding rice varieties that improve grain yield with decreased N fertilizer input.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2014 · The Plant Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) plays essential roles in plant growth, development and defense. In response to the JA signal, the CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1)-based SCF complexes recruit JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressors for ubiquitination and degradation, and subsequently regulate their downstream signaling components essential for various JA responses. Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the JA signaling pathway and its crosstalk with other phytohormone pathways during the past two decades. Recent studies have revealed that a variety of positive and negative regulators act as targets of JAZs to control distinctive JA responses, and that JAZs and these regulators function as crucial interfaces to mediate synergy and antagonism between JA and other phytohormones. Owing to different regulatory players in JA perception and JA signaling, a fine-tuning of JA-dependent processes in plant growth, development and defense is achieved. In this review, we will summarize the latest progresses in JA signaling and its crosstalk with gibberellin and ethylene.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Current Opinion in Plant Biology
  • Bosen Zhang · Chuanqing Sun · Daoxin Xie · Lubin Tan
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    ABSTRACT: Plant height and tiller number are indispensible for the establishment of grain production in rice (Oryza sativa L.). A new rice mutant high-tillering dwarf 3 (htd3) exhibiting more tiller number and shorter culm length than the wild-type Guichao 2 (GC2, an indica cultivar) was used to investigate the global gene expression patterns at days after germination 25 (DAG25) and DAG60. In this study, we identified 305 and 987 genes with at least twofold change in gene expression level at DAG25 and DAG60 respectively using the rice microarray chip. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these twofold change regulated genes revealed that large numbers of genes were involved in binding activity, catalytic activity and metabolic process. The chip results also showed that some of the regulated genes involved in diverse molecular pathways, including gibberellin pathway, brassinosteroid pathway and auxin signal, had significant differences in gene expression abundance at DAG60. This genome-wide gene expression analysis could provide a new opportunity to uncover the regulation mechanisms of the development of culm and tiller, two important components of yields in rice.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Genes & genomics
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    ABSTRACT: Integration of diverse environmental and endogenous signals to coordinately regulate growth, development, and defense is essential for plants to survive in their natural habitat. The hormonal signals gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA) antagonistically and synergistically regulate diverse aspects of plant growth, development, and defense. GA and JA synergistically induce initiation of trichomes, which assist seed dispersal and act as barriers to protect plants against insect attack, pathogen infection, excessive water loss, and UV irradiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying such synergism between GA and JA signaling remains unclear. In this study, we revealed a mechanism for GA and JA signaling synergy and identified a signaling complex of the GA pathway in regulation of trichome initiation. Molecular, biochemical, and genetic evidence showed that the WD-repeat/bHLH/MYB complex acts as a direct target of DELLAs in the GA pathway and that both DELLAs and JAZs interacted with the WD-repeat/bHLH/MYB complex to mediate synergism between GA and JA signaling in regulating trichome development. GA and JA induce degradation of DELLAs and JASMONATE ZIM-domain proteins to coordinately activate the WD-repeat/bHLH/MYB complex and synergistically and mutually dependently induce trichome initiation. This study provides deep insights into the molecular mechanisms for integration of different hormonal signals to synergistically regulate plant development.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · The Plant Cell
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    ABSTRACT: Jasmonate (JA) regulates various plant defense and developmental processes. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) perceives JA signals to mediate diverse plant responses including male fertility, root growth, anthocyanin accumulation, and defense against abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genetic, physiological and biochemical analysis on a series of coi1 mutant alleles, and found that different amino acid mutations in COI1 distinctively affect JA-regulated male fertility in Arabidopsis. All the JA responses are disrupted by the COI1 mutations W467* in coi1-1, Q343* (coi1-6), G369E (coi1-4), G98D (coi1-5), G155E (coi1-7), D452A (coi1-9) and L490A (coi1-10), though the coi1-5 mutant (COI1G98D) contains adequate COI1 protein (∼60% of wild-type). Interestingly, the low basal level of COI1(E543K) in the coi1-8 mutant (∼10% of wild-type COI1 level) is sufficient for maintaining male fertility (∼50% of wild-type fertility); the coi1-2 mutant with low level of COI1(L245F) (∼10% of wild-type) is male sterile under normal growth condition (22°C) but male fertile (∼80% of wild-type fertility) at low temperature (16°C); however, both coi1-2 and coi1-8 are defective in the other JA responses (root growth, anthocyanin accumulation, and plant response to the pathogen Pst DC3000 infection).
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · Science China. Life sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms for integration of endogenous and exogenous signals to adapt to the changing environment. Both the phytohormones jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) regulate plant growth, development, and defense. In addition to synergistic regulation of root hair development and resistance to necrotrophic fungi, JA and ET act antagonistically to regulate gene expression, apical hook curvature, and plant defense against insect attack. However, the molecular mechanism for such antagonism between JA and ET signaling remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that interaction between the JA-activated transcription factor MYC2 and the ET-stabilized transcription factor ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) modulates JA and ET signaling antagonism in Arabidopsis thaliana. MYC2 interacts with EIN3 to attenuate the transcriptional activity of EIN3 and repress ET-enhanced apical hook curvature. Conversely, EIN3 interacts with and represses MYC2 to inhibit JA-induced expression of wound-responsive genes and herbivory-inducible genes and to attenuate JA-regulated plant defense against generalist herbivores. Coordinated regulation of plant responses in both antagonistic and synergistic manners would help plants adapt to fluctuating environments.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014 · The Plant Cell
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    Preview · Article · Jan 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Inflorescence architecture is a key agronomical factor determining grain yield, and thus has been a major target of cereal crop domestication. Transition from a spread panicle typical of ancestral wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) to the compact panicle of present cultivars (O. sativa L.) was a crucial event in rice domestication. Here we show that the spread panicle architecture of wild rice is controlled by a dominant gene, OsLG1, a previously reported SBP-domain transcription factor that controls rice ligule development. Association analysis indicates that a single-nucleotide polymorphism-6 in the OsLG1 regulatory region led to a compact panicle architecture in cultivars during rice domestication. We speculate that the cis-regulatory mutation can fine-tune the spatial expression of the target gene, and that selection of cis-regulatory mutations might be an efficient strategy for crop domestication.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Nature Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Plants have evolved sophisticated systems for adaptation to their natural habitat. In response to developmental and environmental cues, plants produce and perceive jasmonate (JA) signals, which induce degradation of JASMONATE-ZIM-Domain (JAZ) proteins and derepress the JAZ-repressed transcription factors to regulate diverse aspects of defense responses and developmental processes. Here, we identified the bHLH subgroup IIId transcription factors (bHLH3, bHLH13, bHLH14 and bHLH17) as novel targets of JAZs. These bHLH subgroup IIId transcription factors act as transcription repressors and function redundantly to negatively regulate JA responses. The quadruple mutant bhlh3 bhlh13 bhlh14 bhlh17 showed severe sensitivity to JA-inhibited root growth and JA-induced anthocyanin accumulation, and exhibited obvious increase in JA-regulated plant defense against pathogen infection and insect attack. Transgenic plants overexpressing bHLH13 or bHLH17 displayed reduced JA responses. Furthermore, these bHLH factors functioned as transcription repressors to antagonize the transcription activators, such as MYC2 and the WD-repeat/bHLH/MYB complex, through binding to their target sequences. Coordinated regulation of JA responses by transcription activators and repressors would benefit plants by allowing fine regulation of defense and development, and survival in their frequently changing environment.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · PLoS Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) hydrolyzes fumarylacetoacetate to fumarate and acetoacetate, the final step in tyrosine (Tyr) degradation pathway that is essential to animals. Deficiency of FAH in animals results in an inborn lethal disorder. However, the role for Tyr degradation pathway in plants remains to be elucidated. In this study we isolated an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) short-day sensitive cell death1 (sscd1) mutant that displays a spontaneous cell death phenotype under short-day condition. The SSCD1 gene was cloned via a map-based cloning approach and found to encode an Arabidopsis putative FAH. The spontaneous cell death phenotype of the sscd1 mutant was completely eliminated by further knockout of the gene encoding the putative homogentisate dioxygenase, which catalyzes homogentisate into maleylacetoacetate (the antepenultimate step) in Tyr degradation pathway. Furthermore, treatment of Arabidopsis wild-type seedlings with succinylacetone, an abnormal metabolite caused by loss of FAH in Tyr degradation pathway, mimicked the sscd1 cell death phenotype. These results demonstrate that disruption of FAH leads to cell death in Arabidopsis and suggest that Tyr degradation pathway is essential for plant survival under short-day condition.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Plant physiology
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    Po Hu · Wu Zhou · Zhiwei Cheng · Meng Fan · Lei Wang · Daoxin Xie
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    ABSTRACT: Plants evolve effective mechanisms to protect themselves from environmental stresses and employ jasmonates as vital defense signals to defend against insect attack and pathogen infection. Jasmonates are also recognized as an essential growth regulator by which diverse developmental processes are mediated. Despite substantial research, there are no key signaling components reported yet to control jasmonate-regulated plant defense independent of developmental responses. We identify JAV1, a key gene in the jasmonate pathway, which functions as a negative regulator to control plant defense but does not play a detectable role in plant development. Our results suggest that when encountering insect attack and pathogen infection, plants accumulate jasmonates that trigger JAV1 degradation via the 26S proteasome to activate defensive gene expression and elevate resistances against both insects and pathogens. These findings have provided insight into the molecular mechanism by which plants integrate jasmonate signals to protect themselves from insect attack and pathogen infection.
    Preview · Article · May 2013 · Molecular cell
  • Tiancong Qi · Susheng Song · Daoxin Xie
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    ABSTRACT: The jasmonate (JA) ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana repress JA signaling and negatively regulate the JA responses. Recently, JAZ proteins have been found to inhibit the transcriptional function of several transcription factors, among which the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) (GLABRA3 [GL3], ENHANCER OF GLABRA3 [EGL3], and TRANSPARENT TESTA8 [TT8]) and R2R3-MYB (GL1 and MYB75) that can interact with each other to form bHLH-MYB complexes and further control gene expression. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is a widely used technique to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Here we describe a modified BiFC experimental procedure to study the inhibition of the formation of the bHLH (GL3)-MYB (GL1) complex by JAZ proteins.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
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    Susheng Song · Tiancong Qi · Huang Huang · Daoxin Xie
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    ABSTRACT: Proper stamen development is essential for plants to achieve their life cycles. Defects in stamen development will cause male sterility. A vast array of research efforts have been made to understand stamen developmental processes and regulatory mechanisms over the past decades. It is so far reported that phytohormones, including jasmonate, auxin, gibberellin, brassinosteroid and cytokinin, play essential roles in regulation of stamen development. This review will briefly summarize the molecular basis for coordinated regulation of stamen development by jasmonate, auxin and gibberellin in Arabidopsis.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Molecular Plant
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    ABSTRACT: Jasmonate regulates critical aspects of plant development and defense. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) functions as a jasmonate receptor and forms Skp1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCF(COI1)) complexes with Arabidopsis thaliana Cullin1 and Arabidopsis Skp1-like1 (ASK1) to recruit its substrate jasmonate ZIM-domain proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we reveal a mechanism regulating COI1 protein levels in Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical analysis and in vitro degradation assays demonstrated that the COI1 protein was initially stabilized by interacting with ASK1 and further secured by assembly into SCF(COI1) complexes, suggesting a function for SCF(COI1) in the stabilization of COI1 in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we show that dissociated COI1 is degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway, and we identified the 297th Lys residue as an active ubiquitination site in COI1. Our data suggest that the COI1 protein is strictly regulated by a dynamic balance of SCF(COI1)-mediated stabilization and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation and thus maintained at a protein level essential for proper biological functions in Arabidopsis development and defense responses.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · The Plant Cell
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    ABSTRACT: Jasmonate regulates critical aspects of plant development and defense. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) functions as a jasmonate receptor and forms Skp1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1(SCF COI1 ) COI1plexes with Arabidopsis thaliana Cullin1 and Arabidopsis Skp1-like1 (ASK1) to recruit its substrate jasmonate ZIM-domain proteins for ubiquitination and degradation. Here, we reveal a mechanism regulating COI1 protein levels in Arabidopsis. Genetic and biochemical analysis and in vitro degradation assays demonstrated that the COI1 protein was initially stabilized by interacting with ASK1 and further secured by assembly into SCF COI1 complexes, suggesting a function for SCF COI1 in the stabilization of COI1 in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we show that dissociated COI1 is degraded through the 26S proteasome pathway, and we identified the 297th Lys residue as an active ubiquitination site in COI1. Our data suggest that the COI1 protein is strictly regulated by a dynamic balance of SCF COI1 -mediated stabilization and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation and thus maintained at a protein level essential for proper biological functions in Arabidopsis development and defense responses.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · The Plant Cell
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    Xiaoyi Shan · Jianbin Yan · Daoxin Xie
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    ABSTRACT: Plant hormones are crucial signaling molecules that coordinate all aspects of plant growth, development and defense. A great deal of attention has been attracted from biologists to study the molecular mechanisms for perception and signal transduction of plant hormones during the last two decades. Tremendous progress has been made in identifying receptors and key signaling components of plant hormones. The holistic picture of hormone signaling pathways is extremely complicated, this review will give a general overview of perception and signal transduction mechanisms of auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, brassinosteroid, and jasmonate.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · Current opinion in plant biology

Publication Stats

3k Citations
327.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Tsinghua University
      • School of Life Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2004-2005
    • Institute of Molecular Biology
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
    • Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology
      Tumasik, Singapore
  • 2002
    • Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China