Noriko Miyake

Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan

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Publications (173)711.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) study in five patients (median age 11 (range 4–13) years) with Leigh syndrome to evaluate its usefulness for understanding the functional brain dysfunction in this disease and in future drug trials. Four patients were found to have reported mitochondrial DNA gene mutations. The brain T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high-intensity areas in the putamen bilaterally in five patients, caudate bilaterally in four, thalamus bilaterally in two, and brainstem in one. Cerebellar atrophy was observed in older two patients. For disease control, seven age-matched epilepsy patients who had normal MRI and FDG-PET studies were selected. For semiquantitative analysis of the lesions with decreased 18F-FDG uptake, the mean standard uptake value (SUV) was calculated in regions of interest (ROIs) placed in each brain structure. We compared the SUV of nine segments (the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, thalami, basal ganglia, mid-brain, pons, and cerebellum) between patients with Leigh syndrome and controls. The glucose uptake was decreased significantly in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, which could explain the ataxia and dystonia in patients with Leigh syndrome. Although this study had some limitations, FDG-PET might useful for evaluating the brain dysfunction and treatment efficacy of new drugs in patients with Leigh syndrome. Further study of more patients using advanced methods to quantify glucose uptake is needed before drawing a conclusion.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016
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    ABSTRACT: The voltage-gated Kv10.1 potassium channel, also known as ether-a-go-go-related gene 1, encoded by KCNH1 (potassium voltage-gated channel, subfamily H (eag related), member 1) is predominantly expressed in the central nervous system. Recently, de novo missense KCNH1 mutations have been identified in six patients with Zimmermann-Laband syndrome and in four patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome. These syndromes were historically considered distinct. Here we report three de novo missense KCNH1 mutations in four patients with syndromic developmental delay and epilepsy. Two novel KCNH1 mutations (p.R357Q and p.R357P), found in three patients, were located at the evolutionally highly conserved arginine in the channel voltage-sensor domain (S4). Another mutation (p.G496E) was found in the channel pore domain (S6) helix, which acts as a hinge in activation gating and mainly conducts non-inactivating outward potassium current. A previously reported p.G496R mutation was shown to produce no voltage-dependent outward current in CHO cells, suggesting that p.G496E may also disrupt the proper function of the Kv channel pore. Our report confirms that KCNH1 mutations are associated with syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder, and also support the functional importance of the S4 domain.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 28 January 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.1.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Human Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Joubert syndrome is a rare inherited cerebellar ataxia with the dysgenesis of the cerebellar vermis, called the molar tooth sign. The combination of a large number of causative genes, more than 27, and the various clinical features involving multiple organs has established many genotypic-phenotypic correlations in Joubert syndrome. TMEM67 is one of the genes that are relatively well established as contributing to Joubert syndrome with liver involvement. Here, we report a 2-month-old boy who was initially treated for urinary tract infection, which further led to the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome accompanied by renal hypodysplasia with two different mutations: c.2522A>C and c.1065 + 4Adel in TMEM67.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    ABSTRACT: Three recessive mutations in the sodium leak channel, nonselective (NALCN) have been reported to cause intellectual disability and hypotonia. In addition, 14 de novo heterozygous mutations have been identified in 15 patients with arthrogryposis and neurodevelopmental impairment. Here, we report three patients with neurodevelopmental disease and hypotonia, harboring one recurrent (p.R1181Q) and two novel mutations (p.L312V and p.V1020F) occurring de novo in NALCN. Mutation p.L312 is located in the pore forming S6 region of domain I and p.V1020F in the S5 region of domain III. Mutation p.R1181Q is in a linker region. Mapping these three mutations to a model of NALCN showed p.Leu312 and p.Val1020 positioned in the hydrophobic core of the pore modules, indicating these two mutations may affect the gating function of NALCN. Although p.R1181Q is unlikely to affect the ion channel structure, previous studies have shown that an analogous mutation in Caenorhabditis elegans produced a phenotype with a coiling locomotion, suggesting that p.R1181Q could also affect NALCN function. Our three patients showed profound intellectual disability and growth delay, facial dysmorphologies and hypotonia. The present data support previous work suggesting heterozygous NALCN mutations lead to syndromic neurodevelopmental impairment.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 14 January 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.163.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Human Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECT The authors' goal in this paper is to provide the first clinical, radiological, and genetic studies of panventriculomegaly (PaVM) defined by a wide foramen of Magendie and large cisterna magna. METHODS Clinical and brain imaging data from 28 PaVM patients (including 10 patients from 5 families) were retrospectively studied. Five children were included. In adult patients, the age at onset was 56.0 ± 16.7 years. Tetraventricular dilation, aqueductal opening with flow void on T2-weighted images, and a wide foramen of Magendie and large cisterna magna (wide cerebrospinal fluid space at the fourth ventricle outlet) were essential MRI findings for PaVM diagnosis. 3D fast asymmetrical spin echo sequences were used for visualization of cistern membranes. Time-spatial labeling inversion pulse examination was performed to analyze cerebrospinal fluid movement. Copy number variations were determined using high-resolution microarray and were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction with breakpoint sequencing. RESULTS Adult patients showed gait disturbance, urinary dysfunction, and cognitive dysfunction. Five infant patients exhibited macrocranium. Patients were divided into 2 subcategories, those with or without downward bulging third ventricular floors and membranous structures in the prepontine cistern. Patients with bulging floors were successfully treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Genetic analysis revealed a deletion in DNAH14 that encodes a dynein heavy chain protein associated with motile cilia function, and which co-segregated with patients in a family without a downward bulging third ventricular floor. CONCLUSIONS Panventriculomegaly with a wide foramen of Magendie and a large cisterna magna may belong to a subtype of congenital hydrocephalus with familial accumulation, younger age at onset, and symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus. In addition, a family with PaVM has a gene mutation associated with dysfunction of motile cilia.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Neurosurgery
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    ABSTRACT: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) (MIM #606690) is a rare lung disorder leading to respiratory failure associated with progressive cystic destruction due to the proliferation and infiltration of abnormal smooth muscle-like cells (LAM cells). LAM can occur alone (sporadic LAM, S-LAM) or combined with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC-LAM). TSC is caused by a germline heterozygous mutation in either TSC1 or TSC2, and TSC-LAM is thought to occur as a result of a somatic mutation (second hit) in addition to a germline mutation in TSC1 or TSC2 (first hit). S-LAM is also thought to occur under the two-hit model involving a somatic mutation and/or loss of heterozygosity in TSC2. To identify TSC1 or TSC2 changes in S-LAM patients, the two genes were analyzed by deep next-generation sequencing (NGS) using genomic DNA from blood leukocytes (n = 9), LAM tissue from lung (n = 7), LAM cultured cells (n = 4), or LAM cell clusters (n = 1). We identified nine somatic mutations in six of nine S-LAM patients (67 %) with mutant allele frequencies of 1.7-46.2 %. Three of these six patients (50 %) showed two different TSC2 mutations with allele frequencies of 1.7-28.7 %. Furthermore, at least five mutations with low prevalence (<20 % of allele frequency) were confirmed by droplet digital PCR. As LAM tissues are likely to be composed of heterogeneous cell populations, mutant allele frequencies can be low. Our results confirm the consistent finding of TSC2 mutations in LAM samples, and highlight the benefit of laser capture microdissection and in-depth allele analyses for detection, such as NGS.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Human Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEDAC) is a cyst in the spinal canal that protrudes into the epidural space from a defect in the dura mater and leads to neurological disturbances. We previously showed that familial SEDAC is caused by FOXC2 mutation; however, the causal gene of sporadic SEDAC has not been identified. To identify the causal gene of sporadic SEDAC, we performed whole exome sequencing for 12 subjects with sporadic SEDAC and identified heterozygous HOXD4 loss-of-function mutations in three subjects. HOXD4 haplo-insufficiency causes SEDAC and a transcriptional network containing HOXD4 and FOXC2 is involved in the development of the dura mater and the etiology of SEDAC.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Dynamin 1 (DNM1) is a large guanosine triphosphatase involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In recent studies, de novo mutations in DNM1 have been identified in five individuals with epileptic encephalopathy. In this study, we report two patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy possessing de novo DNM1 mutations. Using whole exome sequencing, we detected the novel mutation c.127G>A (p.Gly43Ser) in a patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and a recurrent mutation c.709C>T (p.Arg237Trp) in a patient with West syndrome. Structural consideration of DNM1 mutations revealed that both mutations would destabilize the G domain structure and impair nucleotide binding, dimer formation, and/or GTPase activity of the G domain. These and previous cases of DNM1 mutations were reviewed to verify the phenotypic spectrum. The main clinical features of DNM1 mutations include intractable seizures, intellectual disability, developmental delay, and hypotonia. Most cases showed development delay before the onset of seizures. A patient carrying p.Arg237Trp in this report showed a different developmental status from that of a previously reported case, together with characteristic extrapyramidal movement.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Epilepsia
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a male patient with dual genetic diagnoses of atypical hand-foot-genital syndrome (HFGS) and developmental delay. The proband had features of HFGS that included bilateral vesicoureteric junction obstruction with ectopic ureters, brachydactyly of various fingers and toes, hypoplastic thenar eminences, and absent nails on both 4th toes and right 5th toe. The atypical features of HFGS present were bilateral hallux valgus malformations and bilateral preaxial polydactyly of the hands. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a de novo 0.5 Mb deletion at 2p16.3, including the first four exons of the NRXN1 gene. Whole exome sequencing and subsequent Sanger sequencing identified a de novo missense mutation (c.1123G>T, p.Val375Phe) in exon 2 of the HOXA13 gene, predicted to be damaging and located in the homeobox domain. The intragenic NRXN1 deletion is thought to explain his developmental delay via a separate genetic mechanism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A
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    ABSTRACT: Cataract is defined as opacity in the crystalline lens and congenital cataract occurs during the first year of life. Until now, mutations of more than 50 genes in congenital cataract have been reported with various modes of inheritance. Among them, HSF4 mutations have been reported in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and age-related forms of cataract. The inheritance patterns of these mutations depend on their mutational positions in HSF4: autosomal dominant or recessive mutations are respectively found either in a DNA-binding domain or in (or downstream of) hydrophobic repeats. Here we report a novel homozygous HSF4 mutation (c.521T>C, p.Leu174Pro) in two affected sibs of an Iranian consanguineous family using whole exome sequencing. The mutation is predicted as highly pathogenic by in silico analysis (SIFT, Polyphen2 and MutationTaster) and is not found in any of control databases. This mutation is located in a hydrophobic repeat of the HSF4 protein, which is consistent with the mode of inheritance as an autosomal recessive trait.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 22 October 2015; doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.127.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Human Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: The voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channel encoded by KCNB1 produces the major delayed rectifier potassium current in pyramidal neurons. Recently, de novo heterozygous missense KCNB1 mutations have been identified in three patients with epileptic encephalopathy and a patient with neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the frequency of KCNB1 mutations in infantile epileptic patients and their effects on neuronal activity are yet unknown. We searched whole exome sequencing data of a total of 437 patients with infantile epilepsy, and found novel de novo heterozygous missense KCNB1 mutations in two patients showing psychomotor developmental delay and severe infantile generalized seizures with high-amplitude spike-and-wave electroencephalogram discharges. The mutation located in the channel voltage sensor (p.R306C) disrupted sensitivity and cooperativity of the sensor, while the mutation in the channel pore domain (p.G401R) selectively abolished endogenous Kv2 currents in transfected pyramidal neurons, indicating a dominant-negative effect. Both mutants inhibited repetitive neuronal firing through preventing production of deep interspike voltages. Thus KCNB1 mutations can be a rare genetic cause of infantile epilepsy, and insufficient firing of pyramidal neurons would disturb both development and stability of neuronal circuits, leading to the disease phenotypes.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Scientific Reports
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    ABSTRACT: Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED, SL-AC), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder with various skeletal changes characterized by premature calcification leading to severe disproportionate short stature. Twenty-two patients have been reported until now, but only five mutations (four missense and one splice-site) in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene has been identified. We report here a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.370C > T (p.Arg124Trp) in a Moroccan girl with SMED, SL-AC, identified by whole exome sequencing. Our study has expanded the mutational spectrum of this rare disease and it has shown that exome sequencing is a powerful and cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of clinically heterogeneous disorders such as SMED. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A
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    ABSTRACT: Warburg micro syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease where patients present with optic, neurologic and genital symptoms. Until now, four disease genes for Warburg micro syndrome, RAB3GAP1, RAB3GAP2, RAB18 and TBC1D20, have been identified. Here, we report two novel homozygous RAB3GAP1 mutations (c.22G>T, p.Glu8* and c.1353delA, p.Pro452Hisfs*5) in two consanguineous families by whole-exome sequencing.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, de novo KIF1A mutations were identified in patients with intellectual disability, spasticity and cerebellar atrophy and/or optic nerve atrophy. In this study, we analyzed a total of 62 families, including 68 patients with genetically unsolved childhood cerebellar atrophy, by whole-exome sequencing (WES). We identified five de novo missense KIF1A mutations, including only one previously reported mutation (p.Arg316Trp). All the mutations are located in the motor domain of KIF1A. In all patients, initial symptom onset was during the infantile period, and included developmental delay in three patients and gait disturbance in two. Thereafter, they showed gait disturbances, exaggerated deep tendon reflexes, cerebellar symptoms and cerebellar atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Four patients showed lower limb spasticity, upper limb clumsiness and visual disturbances. Nerve conduction study revealed peripheral neuropathy in three patients. This study further delineates clinical features of de novo KIF1A mutations. Genetic testing of KIF1A should be considered in children with developmental delay, cerebellar atrophy and pyramidal features.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 10 September 2015; doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.108.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Human Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a huge protein complex embedded in the nuclear envelope. It has central functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear framework, and gene regulation. Nucleoporin 107 kDa (NUP107) is a component of the NPC central scaffold and is an essential protein in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report on biallelic NUP107 mutations in nine affected individuals who are from five unrelated families and show early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). These individuals have pathologically focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, a condition that leads to end-stage renal disease with high frequency. NUP107 is ubiquitously expressed, including in glomerular podocytes. Three of four NUP107 mutations detected in the affected individuals hamper NUP107 binding to NUP133 (nucleoporin 133 kDa) and NUP107 incorporation into NPCs in vitro. Zebrafish with nup107 knockdown generated by morpholino oligonucleotides displayed hypoplastic glomerulus structures and abnormal podocyte foot processes, thereby mimicking the pathological changes seen in the kidneys of the SRNS individuals with NUP107 mutations. Considering the unique properties of the podocyte (highly differentiated foot-process architecture and slit membrane and the inability to regenerate), we propose a "podocyte-injury model" as the pathomechanism for SRNS due to biallelic NUP107 mutations.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The American Journal of Human Genetics
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    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Fluids and Barriers of the CNS
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    ABSTRACT: KCNT1 mutations have been found in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS; also known as migrating partial seizures in infancy), autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, and other types of early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs). We performed KCNT1-targeted next-generation sequencing (207 samples) and/or whole-exome sequencing (229 samples) in a total of 362 patients with Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, EIMFS, or unclassified EOEEs. We identified nine heterozygous KCNT1 mutations in 11 patients: nine of 18 EIMFS cases (50%) in whom migrating foci were observed, one of 180 West syndrome cases (0.56%), and one of 66 unclassified EOEE cases (1.52%). KCNT1 mutations occurred de novo in 10 patients, and one was transmitted from the patient's mother who carried a somatic mosaic mutation. The mutations accumulated in transmembrane segment 5 (2/9, 22.2%) and regulators of K(+) conductance domains (7/9, 77.8%). Five of nine mutations were recurrent. Onset ages ranged from the neonatal period (<1 month) in five patients (5/11, 45.5%) to 1-4 months in six patients (6/11, 54.5%). A generalized attenuation of background activity on electroencephalography was seen in six patients (6/11, 54.5%). Our study demonstrates that the phenotypic spectrum of de novo KCNT1 mutations is largely restricted to EIMFS. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Epilepsia
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    ABSTRACT: Glycine encephalopathy (GCE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in the glycine cleavage complex. Here we report a patient with GCE and elevated level of glycine in both the serum and the cerebrospinal fluid. Trio-based whole-exome sequencing identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.738-2A>G and c.929T>C (p.Met310Thr)) in LIAS. To date, three homozygous mutations have been reported in LIAS. All previously reported GCE patients also show elevated level of serum glycine. Our data further supports LIAS mutations as a genetic cause for GCE.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 25 June 2015; doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.72.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Human Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Leigh syndrome (LS) is an early-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. LS is characterised by elevated lactate and pyruvate and bilateral symmetric hyperintense lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem, cerebral white matter or spinal cord on T2-weighted MRI. LS is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and to date mutations in approximately 40 genes related to mitochondrial function have been linked to the disorder. We investigated a pair of female monozygotic twins diagnosed with LS from consanguineous healthy parents of Indian origin. Their common clinical features included optic atrophy, ophthalmoplegia, spastic paraparesis and mild intellectual disability. High-blood lactate and high-intensity signal in the brainstem on T2-weighted MRI were consistent with a clinical diagnosis of LS. To identify the genetic cause of their condition, we performed whole exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in C12orf65 (NM_001143905; c.346delG, p.V116*) in the affected twins. Interestingly, the identical mutation was previously reported in an Indian family with Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 6, which displayed some overlapping clinical features with the twins. We demonstrate that the identical nonsense mutation in C12orf65 can result in different clinical features, suggesting the involvement of unknown modifiers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: De novo GNAO1 variants have been found in four patients including three patients with Ohtahara syndrome and one patient with childhood epilepsy. In addition, two patients showed involuntary movements, suggesting that GNAO1 variants can cause various neurological phenotypes. Here we report an additional four patients with de novo missense GNAO1 variants, one of which was identical to that of the previously reported. All the three novel variants were predicted to impair Gαo function by structural evaluation. Two patients showed early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, presenting with migrating or multifocal partial seizures in their clinical course, but the remaining two patients showed no or a few seizures. All the four patients showed severe intellectual disability, motor developmental delay, and involuntary movements. Progressive cerebral atrophy and thin corpus callosum were common features in brain images. Our study demonstrated that GNAO1 variants can cause involuntary movements and severe developmental delay with/without seizures, including various types of early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 13 May 2015; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.92.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · European journal of human genetics: EJHG

Publication Stats

2k Citations
711.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • Yokohama City University
      • Department of Medicine
      Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
    • Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2008
    • Health Sciences University of Hokkaido
      Tōbetsu, Hokkaidō, Japan
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2005-2008
    • Nagasaki University
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
      Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Nagasaki University Hospital
      Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan