Elizabeth M Poole

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (107)698.39 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified several common susceptibility alleles for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To further understand EOC susceptibility, we examined previously ungenotyped candidate variants, including uncommon variants and those residing within known susceptibility loci. Results: At nine of eleven previously published EOC susceptibility regions (2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13), novel variants were identified that were more strongly associated with risk than previously reported variants. Beyond known susceptibility regions, no variants were found to be associated with EOC risk at genome-wide statistical significance (p <5x10-8), nor were any significant after Bonferroni correction for 17,000 variants (p< 3x10-6). Methods: A customized genotyping array was used to assess over 17,000 variants in coding, non-coding, regulatory, and known susceptibility regions in 4,973 EOC cases and 5,640 controls from 13 independent studies. Susceptibility for EOC overall and for select histotypes was evaluated using logistic regression adjusted for age, study site, and population substructure. Conclusion: Given the novel variants identified within the 2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13 regions, larger follow-up genotyping studies, using imputation where necessary, are needed for fine-mapping and confirmation of low frequency variants that fall below statistical significance.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Oncotarget
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Larger social networks have been associated with better breast cancer survival. To investigate potential mediators, we evaluated associations of social network size and diversity with lifestyle and treatment factors associated with prognosis. Methods: We included 9331 women from the After Breast Cancer Pooling Project who provided data on social networks within approximately two years following diagnosis. A social network index was derived from information about the presence of a spouse or intimate partner, religious ties, community participation, friendship ties, and numbers of living relatives. Diversity was assessed as variety of ties, independent of size. We used logistic regression to evaluate associations with outcomes and evaluated whether effect estimates differed using meta-analytic techniques. Results: Associations were similar across cohorts though analyses of smoking and alcohol included US cohorts only because of low prevalence of these behaviors in the Shanghai cohort. Socially isolated women were more likely to be obese (OR = 1.21, 95% CI:1.03-1.42), have low physical activity (<10 MET-hours/week, OR = 1.55, 95% CI:1.36-1.78), be current smokers (OR = 2.77, 95% CI:2.09-3.68), and have high alcohol intake (≥15 g/d, OR = 1.23, 95% CI:1.00-1.51), compared with socially integrated women. Among node positive cases from three cohorts, socially isolated women were more likely not to receive chemotherapy (OR = 2.10, 95% CI:1.30-3.39); associations differed in a fourth cohort. Other associations (nonsignificant) were consistent with less intensive treatment in socially isolated women. Low social network diversity was independently associated with more adverse lifestyle, but not clinical, factors. Conclusions: Small, less diverse social networks measured post-diagnosis were associated with more adverse lifestyle factors and less intensive cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Psycho-Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: A fundamental goal of epidemiologic research is to investigate the relationship between exposures and disease risk. Cases of the disease are often considered a single outcome and assumed to share a common etiology. However, evidence indicates that many human diseases arise and evolve through a range of heterogeneous molecular pathologic processes, influenced by diverse exposures. Pathogenic heterogeneity has been considered in various neoplasms such as colorectal, lung, prostate, and breast cancers, leukemia and lymphoma, and non-neoplastic diseases, including obesity, type II diabetes, glaucoma, stroke, cardiovascular disease, autism, and autoimmune disease. In this article, we discuss analytic options for studying disease subtype heterogeneity, emphasizing methods for evaluating whether the association of a potential risk factor with disease varies by disease subtype. Methods are described for scenarios where disease subtypes are categorical and ordinal and for cohort studies, matched and unmatched case-control studies, and case-case study designs. For illustration, we apply the methods to a molecular pathological epidemiology study of alcohol intake and colon cancer risk by tumor LINE-1 methylation subtypes. User-friendly software to implement the methods is publicly available. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Statistics in Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Lifestyle factors have been well-studied in relation to breast cancer prognosis overall, however, associations of lifestyle and late outcomes (>5 after diagnosis) have been much less studied, and no studies have focused on ER+ breast cancer survivors, who may have high risk of late recurrence and mortality. We utilized a large prospective pooling study to evaluate the associations of lifestyle factors with late recurrence and all-cause mortality among 6,295 5-year ER+ stage I-III breast cancer survivors. Pooled and harmonized data were available on clinical factors and lifestyle factors (pre-to-post-diagnosis weight change, BMI (kg/m(2) ), recreational physical activity (PA), alcohol intake, and smoking history), measured on average 2.1 years after diagnosis. Updated information for weight only was available. Study heterogeneity was evaluated by the Q statistic. Multivariable Cox regression models were stratified by study. Adjusting for clinical factors and potential confounders, ≥10% weight gain and obesity (BMI 30-34.99 and ≥35) were associated with increased risk of late recurrence (HRs (95% CIs): 1.24 (1.00-1.53), 1.40 (1.05-1.86) and 1.41 (1.02-1.93), respectively). Daily alcohol intake was associated with late recurrence, 1.28 (1.01-1.62). PA was inversely associated with late all-cause mortality (0.81 (0.71-0.93) and 0.71 (0.61-0.82) for 4.9-<17.4 and ≥17.4 MET-h/wk). A U-shaped association was observed for late all-cause mortality and BMI using updated weight (1.42 (1.15-1.74) and 1.40 (1.09-1.81), <21.5 and ≥ 35, respectively). Smoking was associated with increased risk of late outcomes. In this large prospective pooling project, modifiable lifestyle factors were associated with late outcomes among long-term ER+ breast cancer survivors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2*c.9976A>T; p.Lys3326*; rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association. There is scant information about the effect of K3326X in other hormone-related cancers. Methods: Using weighted logistic regression, we analyzed data from the large iCOGS study including 76 637 cancer case patients and 83 796 control patients to estimate odds ratios (ORw) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for K3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1 variant carriers. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The K3326X variant was associated with breast (ORw = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.40, P = 5.9x10(-) (6)) and invasive ovarian cancer (ORw = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.43, P = 3.8x10(-3)). These associations were stronger for serous ovarian cancer and for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10(-5) and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10(-5), respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.84, P = .013) but no association with breast cancer. No association with prostate cancer was observed. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that the K3326X variant is associated with risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers independent of other pathogenic variants in BRCA2. Further studies are needed to determine the biological mechanism of action responsible for these associations.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of the National Cancer Institute
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: While emerging evidence supports a possible link between depression and ovarian cancer progression, no prospective studies have explored the association with ovarian cancer risk. Methods: We prospectively followed 77 451 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1992-2010) and 106 452 women from the Nurses' Health Study II (1993-2011). Depression was defined as having one or more of the following: a 5-item Mental Health Index (MHI-5) score≤52, antidepressant use, or physician-diagnosed depression. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between depression and incident ovarian cancer. Results: We documented 698 incident cases of epithelial ovarian cancer during follow-up. In multivariable analyses, depression assessed 2-4years before cancer diagnosis was associated with a modestly higher incidence of ovarian cancer (HR=1.30, 95% CI1.05-1.60). Compared to women with persistent negative depression status, the adjusted HRs were 1.34 (95% CI 1.01-1.76) for women with persistent positive depression status and 1.28 (95% CI 0.88-1.85) for women with worsening depression status over follow-up. The association did not appear to vary by ovarian cancer risk factors or tumor characteristics. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that depression may be associated with a modestly increased risk of ovarian cancer. Given the relatively high prevalence of depression in women, future work in larger prospective human studies is needed to confirm our results.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Gynecologic Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here we evaluated associations between common genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels) in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15,397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r(2) with rs17507066=0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1 x10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72x10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r(2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70 x 10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q11.2 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Carcinogenesis
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Genetic Epidemiology
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have reported 11 regions conferring risk of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses can identify candidate susceptibility genes at risk loci. Here we evaluate cis-eQTL associations at 47 regions associated with HGSOC risk (P≤10(-5)). For three cis-eQTL associations (P<1.4 × 10(-3), FDR<0.05) at 1p36 (CDC42), 1p34 (CDCA8) and 2q31 (HOXD9), we evaluate the functional role of each candidate by perturbing expression of each gene in HGSOC precursor cells. Overexpression of HOXD9 increases anchorage-independent growth, shortens population-doubling time and reduces contact inhibition. Chromosome conformation capture identifies an interaction between rs2857532 and the HOXD9 promoter, suggesting this SNP is a leading causal variant. Transcriptomic profiling after HOXD9 overexpression reveals enrichment of HGSOC risk variants within HOXD9 target genes (P=6 × 10(-10) for risk variants (P<10(-4)) within 10 kb of a HOXD9 target gene in ovarian cells), suggesting a broader role for this network in genetic susceptibility to HGSOC.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Nature Communications
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    ABSTRACT: Despite multiple hypotheses for a protective effect, epidemiologic findings are inconsistent regarding the association between physical activity and risk of ovarian cancer. Considering physical activity assessment at different times of life, including pre- and postmenopause, may be important for explaining these discrepancies. Therefore, we examined the risk of ovarian cancer according to total, premenopausal and postmenopausal physical activity among 85,462 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 112,679 women from the Nurses' Health Study II. Leisure-time physical activity was prospectively assessed about every 2-4 years using validated questionnaires, and characterized as metabolic equivalent task hours per week (MET-hrs/week), which combines exercise duration and intensity. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for these associations. We identified 815 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases during 24 years of follow-up. A modestly increased ovarian cancer risk was observed for high levels of total cumulative average physical activity and a suggestively increased risk for low activity. Compared with 3-9 MET-hrs/week, HRs (95% CIs) were 1.26 (1.02, 1.55) for ≥27 MET-hrs/week (equivalent to 1 hr/day of brisk walking) and 1.19 (0.94, 1.52) for <3 MET-hrs/week. This association was limited to premenopausal physical activity (comparable HR [95% CI] of 1.50 [1.13, 1.97] and 1.29 [0.95, 1.75], respectively). Postmenopausal physical activity was not associated with risk. Our data do not support a protective role of physical activity for ovarian cancer. The increased risk associated with physical activity during premenopausal years and the underlying etiology require further investigation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2015 UICC.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · International Journal of Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10-8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10-12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10-13). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10-4, false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Nature Genetics

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Clinical Cancer Research

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Clinical Cancer Research
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    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Cancer Research

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Cancer Research

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3,194 cases and 7,060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customised iCOGS arrays (10,065 cases and 21,663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI=0.18-0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI=0.07-0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI=0.05-0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI=0.11-0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Human Molecular Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Melatonin has anti-carcinogenic properties, including modulation of estradiol production, cell cycle regulation, and promotion of apoptosis. Urinary melatonin has been inversely associated with breast cancer in some studies, but the association with ovarian cancer has not been investigated. We measured urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) in nested ovarian cancer case-control studies in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; n = 100 cases; 199 controls) and NHSII (n = 52 cases; 105 controls); samples were mainly from first morning voids. Controls were matched to cases on year of birth, menopause status, use of menopausal hormone therapy, and urine collection characteristics. We evaluated the association of tertiles of aMT6s, corrected for creatinine concentrations, with risk of ovarian cancer using conditional logistic regression. Models were adjusted for key ovarian cancer risk factors, and we additionally evaluated adjustment for usual sleep duration, snoring, and history of rotating night shift work. aMT6s was not significantly associated with risk of ovarian cancer. In multivariable models, the odds ratio comparing the highest tertile of aMT6s to the lowest was 0.79, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.40-1.56 in the NHS and 2.88, and 95 % CI in the NHSII 0.97-8.52. Additional adjustment for sleep habits and night shift work had little impact on the observed results. We observed no clear association between urinary melatonin and ovarian cancer risk. These results are consistent with our previous study in which we reported no association between night shift work and ovarian cancer; however, given the small sample size in our study, additional evaluation in larger studies is warranted.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Cancer Causes and Control
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far reported 12 loci associated with serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. We hypothesized that some of these loci function through nearby transcription factor (TF) genes and that putative target genes of these TFs as identified by co-expression may also be enriched for additional EOC risk associations. We selected TF genes within 1 Mb of the top signal at the 12 genome-wide significant risk loci. Mutual information, a form of correlation, was used to build networks of genes strongly co-expressed with each selected TF gene in the unified microarray data set of 489 serous EOC tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genes represented in this data set were subsequently ranked using a gene-level test based on results for germline SNPs from a serous EOC GWAS meta-analysis (2,196 cases/4,396 controls). Gene set enrichment analysis identified six networks centered on TF genes (HOXB2, HOXB5, HOXB6, HOXB7 at 17q21.32 and HOXD1, HOXD3 at 2q31) that were significantly enriched for genes from the risk-associated end of the ranked list (P<0.05 and FDR<0.05). These results were replicated (P<0.05) using an independent association study (7,035 cases/21,693 controls). Genes underlying enrichment in the six networks were pooled into a combined network. We identified a HOX-centric network associated with serous EOC risk containing several genes with known or emerging roles in serous EOC development. Network analysis integrating large, context-specific data sets has the potential to offer mechanistic insights into cancer susceptibility and prioritize genes for experimental characterization. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
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    ABSTRACT: Investigations of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) genes and gene-nutrient interactions with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk are limited to candidate polymorphisms and dietary folate. This study comprehensively investigated associations between genetic variants in FOCM and CRC risk and whether the FOCM nutrient status modified these associations. Two hundred eighty-eight candidate and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 30 FOCM genes were genotyped for 821 incident CRC case-control matched pairs in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study cohort. FOCM biomarkers (red blood cell [RBC] folate, plasma folate, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate [PLP], vitamin B12, and homocysteine) and self-reported alcohol consumption were measured at the baseline. Conditional logistic regression was implemented; effect modification was examined on the basis of known enzyme-nutrient relations. Statistically significant associations were observed between CRC risk and functionally defined candidate SNPs of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1; K134R), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase (MTRR; P450R), and PR domain containing 2 with ZNF domain (PRDM2; S450N) and a literature candidate SNP of thymidylate synthase (TYMS; g.676789A>T; nominal P < .05). In addition, suggestive associations were noted for tagging SNPs in cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3β (DNMT3B), methionine adenosyltransferase I α (MAT1A), MTHFD1, and MTRR (nominal P < .05; adjusted P, not significant). Significant interactions between nutrient biomarkers and candidate polymorphisms were observed for 1) plasma/RBC folate and folate hydrolase 1 (FOLH1), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), transcobalamin II (TCN2), DNMT1, and DNMT3B; 2) plasma PLP and TYMS TS3; 3) plasma B12 and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 (BHMT2); and 4) homocysteine and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and alanyl-transfer RNA synthetase (AARS). Genetic variants in FOCM genes are associated with CRC risk among postmenopausal women. FOCM nutrients continue to emerge as effect modifiers of genetic influences on CRC risk. Cancer 2015. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Cancer

Publication Stats

1k Citations
698.39 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2016
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • • Channing Division of Network Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011-2015
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2005-2014
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      • • Division of Public Health Sciences
      • • Cancer Prevention Program
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2011-2013
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2006-2011
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2010
    • Moffitt Cancer Center
      Tampa, Florida, United States