Allison F Vitonis

Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (118)625.09 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified several common susceptibility alleles for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To further understand EOC susceptibility, we examined previously ungenotyped candidate variants, including uncommon variants and those residing within known susceptibility loci. Results: At nine of eleven previously published EOC susceptibility regions (2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13), novel variants were identified that were more strongly associated with risk than previously reported variants. Beyond known susceptibility regions, no variants were found to be associated with EOC risk at genome-wide statistical significance (p <5x10-8), nor were any significant after Bonferroni correction for 17,000 variants (p< 3x10-6). Methods: A customized genotyping array was used to assess over 17,000 variants in coding, non-coding, regulatory, and known susceptibility regions in 4,973 EOC cases and 5,640 controls from 13 independent studies. Susceptibility for EOC overall and for select histotypes was evaluated using logistic regression adjusted for age, study site, and population substructure. Conclusion: Given the novel variants identified within the 2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13 regions, larger follow-up genotyping studies, using imputation where necessary, are needed for fine-mapping and confirmation of low frequency variants that fall below statistical significance.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Oncotarget
  • Benjamin J. Dorton · Allison F. Vitonis · Sarah Feldman
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To identify possible predictors of missed opportunities for human papillomavirus (HPV) counseling and vaccination prior to presentation at an academic colposcopy clinic. Materials and methods: We examined the characteristics of 638 vaccinated and 1,024 unvaccinated age-eligible patients using data from a patient registry of women presenting for colposcopic evaluation between 2/26/2007 and 3/10/2014 who were aged 26 or less at presentation. Demographics, smoking history, pregnancy history, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual history, contraception use, immunosuppression, and medical problems were compared between HPV vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Multivariable logistic regression models included age, race, language, marital status, insurance type, lifetime number of sexual partners, other medical illnesses, number of pregnancies, contraception use, history of STIs, and smoking history to determine predictors of HPV vaccination. Results: In multivariable analysis, race, marital status, and language were not significantly associated with HPV vaccination. Women with fewer pregnancies were more likely to be vaccinated (p-trend <0.0001). Vaccinated women were more likely to have other medical illnesses (OR=1.44, 95% CI=1.13-1.83) and be aware of their HPV status (OR=1.75, 95% CI= 1.40-2.18). Conclusions: In this study, greater number of pregnancies was associated with lower vaccination rates as compared to women who had never been pregnant. Reproductive health visits, such as postpartum and family planning visits, represent an ideal opportunity to educate women about HPV and the importance of vaccination, and should be an area of focus to improve current HPV vaccination rates.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Multiple studies of ovarian cancer and genital talc use have led only to consensus about possible carcinogenicity. Seeking greater clarity, we examined this association in 2041 cases with epithelial ovarian cancer and 2100 age-and-residence-matched controls. Methods: We defined genital talc use as regular application to the genital/rectal area directly, on sanitary napkins, tampons, or underwear. To estimate "talc-years", we multiplied applications-per year by yearsused. Unconditional logistic regression, Wald statistics, likelihood-ratio tests, and polytomous logistic regression were used to calculate: adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), trends, effect-modification, and heterogeneity by ovarian cancer histologic subtype. Results: Overall, genital talc use was associated with an OR (95% CI) of 1.33(1.16, 1.52) with a trend for increasing risk by talc-years. Women who used talc were more likely to be: older, heavier, asthma sufferers, and regular analgesic users-none of which were confounders. Dose-responses were more apparent for premenopausal women , especially non-smokers and those heavier, or postmenopausal users of menopausal hormones (HT). Subtypes of ovarian cancer more likely to be associated with talc included invasive serous and endometrioid tumors and borderline serous and mucinous tumors. Premenopausal women and postmenopausal HT-users with these subtypes who had accumulated >24 talc-years had ORs (95%CI) of 2.33(1.32, 4.12) and 2.57(1.51, 4.36), respectively. Conclusion: Risks for epithelial ovarian cancer from genital talc use vary by histologic subtype, menopausal status at diagnosis, HT use, weight, and smoking. These observations suggest estrogen and/or prolactin may play a role via macrophage activity and inflammatory response to talc.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.)

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To examine hysterectomies in the United States performed for gynecologic malignancies and identify factors associated with the use of minimally invasive techniques. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Inpatient Sample, the largest national all-payer database of hospital discharges. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes for any type of hysterectomy performed for gynecologic malignancy were used to abstract pertinent observations. Weighted multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between demographic and clinical factors and mode of hysterectomy by cancer diagnosis. Results: In 2012, there were an estimated 46,450 hysterectomies for gynecologic malignancy in the United States. Of these, 28,285 (61%) were performed for uterine, 4,275 (9%) for cervical, 12,370 (27%) for ovarian cancer, and 1,520 (3%) for other gynecologic malignancies. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was used in 50% of uterine, 43% of cervical, and 8.5% of ovarian cancer cases. Black women had decreased odds of undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy for uterine (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-0.0.63, P<.001) and cervical (adjusted OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.33-0.96, P=.03) cancers. Those without insurance or with Medicaid had decreased odds of undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy (P<.001) for uterine cancer. As compared with the Northeast, patients in the South (adjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.53-0.98, P=.04) were less likely to undergo minimally invasive hysterectomy for uterine cancer, whereas those in the West more likely (adjusted OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.10-1.99, P=.009). Conclusion: Minimally invasive hysterectomy for gynecologic malignancies remained underused in 2012; there were striking racial disparities associated with use of minimally invasive hysterectomy for uterine and cervical cancers. Level of evidence: III.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Benjamin J Dorton · Allison F Vitonis · Sarah Feldman
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To analyze differences in cytology and histology results between patients previously vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) compared with unvaccinated patients who presented to an academic colposcopy clinic for evaluation of abnormal cervical cytology. Methods: Using data from a patient registry from 2007 to 2014, we examined 1,662 patients aged 26 years or younger at the time of presentation. Demographics, HPV vaccination status, smoking, pregnancy history, sexually transmitted infections, number of sexual partners, contraception, immunosuppression, and other relevant medical issues were reviewed. Cytology and histology results were compared between previously HPV-vaccinated and unvaccinated women to determine if there was a difference in the severity of subsequent cytologic or pathologic specimens. Results: In multivariable analyses, women who previously received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine had 53% (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.66; P<.001) lower odds of presenting with high-grade cytology (adenocarcinoma in situ, atypical glandular cells, atypical squamous cells cannot rule out high grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and 36% (adjusted OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.85; P=.002) lower odds of presenting with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or 3 or worse histology compared with unvaccinated women. Conclusion: Patients presenting for colposcopic evaluation of abnormal cytology who had previously received the HPV vaccine had fewer high-grade lesions on both cytology and histology when compared with HPV-unvaccinated women. Level of evidence: II.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • D.K. Shah · B. Van Voorhis · A. Vitonis · S.A. Missmer

    No preview · Article · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: To identify challenges that impede wider adoption of laparoscopy in gynecologic surgery and assessing whether the current training programs are addressing these challenges adequately. A survey was designed to examine barriers to adoption of laparoscopy for practicing gynecologists. The survey was piloted on gynecologic surgeons and was further refined following their feedback. Finally, the survey was deployed to 4273 gynecologists across the United States via e-mail using the national database of the American Medical Association. Respondents were grouped into two categories based on how often they report referral of patients for laparoscopy. Demographics, training, and practice characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests for categorical variables and t tests for continuous variables. Participants rated factors that were thought to limit laparoscopy use on a 5-point Likert scale; median values of these scores were compared with Wilcoxon rank sum tests. We received 210 responses (29% of people who opened the e-mail and 93% of those who opened the survey). Physicians who perform their own laparoscopies were on average younger and tended to be more subspecialized. Some of the most highly rated limiting factors included lack of adequate surgical volume, reluctance of managing unexpected surgical scenarios, difficulty with video-eye-hand coordination, altered depth perception, and laparoscopic suturing. This survey identified barriers to adoption of laparoscopic surgical techniques beyond what has previously been identified. Based on these findings, novel simulation and continuing medical education curricula can be created to address the primary barriers in order to increase laparoscopic approach to surgery among gynecologists. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Surgical Education
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    ABSTRACT: Patient navigators have been used successfully to guide vulnerable patients through barriers to cancer care and reduce disparities in cancer outcomes. This study evaluated the effect of a patient navigator program on no-show rates at a tertiary care referral colposcopy center and explored factors associated with missed appointments. No-show rates prior and subsequent to implementation of the intervention were compared by chi-square test. We compared patient demographic, lifestyle, and diagnostic characteristics between patients who had ever and never missed appointments. We described patient-reported barriers to care. Of 4,199 women evaluated in our clinic from January 2006 to December 2013, 2,441 (58%) had at least one missed appointment. African American, Hispanic, and publicly insured women tended to miss appointments more frequently than did white and privately insured women (p<0.0001). Patients who missed appointments tended to have more abnormal cytology (p<0.0001), cervical pathology (p=0.007), and vulvar pathology (p=0.001). No-show rates declined from 49.7% to 29.5% after implementation of the patient navigator program (p<0.0001). We found that 45% of patient no-shows were anticipated or a result of patient misunderstanding and could be mediated with targeted education by the patient navigator. Patient navigator programs at referral centers reduce no-show rates, thus improving patient follow-up, which may reduce disparities in cervical cancer screening and treatment.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Journal of Women's Health
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3' UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing particular subgroups, were relatively small. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated ovarian and breast cancer risks as well as clinical outcome associated with rs61764370. Methods: Centralized genotyping and analysis were performed for 140,012 women enrolled in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (15,357 ovarian cancer patients; 30,816 controls), the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (33,530 breast cancer patients; 37,640 controls), and the Consortium of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (14,765 BRCA1 and 7904 BRCA2 mutation carriers). Results: We found no association with risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.94-1.04, p=0.74) or breast cancer (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.01, p=0.19) and results were consistent among mutation carriers (BRCA1, ovarian cancer HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.97-1.23, p=0.14, breast cancer HR=1.04, 95% CI 0.97-1.12, p=0.27; BRCA2, ovarian cancer HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.71-1.13, p=0.34, breast cancer HR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94-1.19, p=0.35). Null results were also obtained for associations with overall survival following ovarian cancer (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.83-1.07, p=0.38), breast cancer (HR=0.96, 95% CI 0.87-1.06, p=0.38), and all other previously-reported associations. Conclusions: rs61764370 is not associated with risk of ovarian or breast cancer nor with clinical outcome for patients with these cancers. Therefore, genotyping this variant has no clinical utility related to the prediction or management of these cancers.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Gynecologic Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether the route and surgical technique by which hysterectomy is performed influence the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. We performed a retrospective analysis of total hysterectomy cases performed at Brigham and Woman's Hospital or Faulkner Hospital during 2009 through 2011. During the study period, 2382 total hysterectomies were performed; 23 of these (0.96%) were diagnosed with cuff dehiscence, and 4 women had recurrent dehiscence. Both laparoscopic (odds ratio, 23.4; P = .007) and robotic (odds ratio, 73; P = .0006) hysterectomies were associated with increased odds of cuff dehiscence in a multivariate regression analysis. The type of energy used during colpotomy, mode of closure (hand sewn, laparoscopic suturing, or suturing assisted by a device), and suture material did not differ significantly between groups; however, continuous suturing of the cuff was a protective factor (odds ratio, 0.24; P = .03). Women with dehiscence had more extensive procedures, as well as an increased incidence of additional major postoperative complications (17.4% vs 3%, P = .004). The rate of cuff dehiscence in our cohort correlates with the current literature. This study suggests that the risk of dehiscence is influenced mainly by the scope and complexity of the surgical procedure. It seems that different colpotomy techniques do not influence the rate of cuff dehiscence; however, continuous suturing of the cuff may be superior to interrupted suturing.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015
  • Divya Kelath Shah · Allison F. Vitonis · Stacey A. Missmer
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and operative time and perioperative morbidity after hysterectomy and determine whether the association varies among abdominal, laparoscopic, and vaginal approaches. Data abstracted from the American College of Surgeons National Safety and Quality Improvement Project registry included 55,409 women who underwent hysterectomy for benign conditions between January 2005 and December 2012. The relationships among BMI, operative time, and morbidity were examined, adjusting for age, race, ethnicity, year of surgery, smoking, diabetes, and American Society for Anesthesiologists physical classification. Adjusted means, incidence rate ratios, or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using linear, Poisson, or logistic regression, respectively. Body mass index was positively correlated with risk of wound complications and infection in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. Compared with those of normal BMI, women with BMIs 40 or higher had five times the odds of wound dehiscence (2.1% compared with 0.3%, crude OR 7.35, CI 3.78-14.30; adjusted OR 5.33, CI 2.63-10.8), five times the odds of wound infection (8.9% compared with 1.4%, crude OR 6.81, CI 5.00-9.27; adjusted OR 5.34, CI 3.85-7.41), and 89% higher odds of sepsis (1.3% compared with 0.6%, crude OR 2.39, CI 1.35-4.24; adjusted OR 1.89, CI 1.01-3.52). The magnitude of the association between wound infection and BMI was smaller after vaginal hysterectomy, and no increased odds of wound complications or sepsis were noted with a laparoscopic approach despite longer operative times. Operative time increased with BMI regardless of surgical approach. No associations were noted between BMI and hospital stay or thromboembolism. Obesity is associated with increased wound complications and infection in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy and with longer operative times regardless of surgical approach. Vaginal or laparoscopic hysterectomy should be performed whenever feasible. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: II.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Obstetrics and Gynecology
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    ABSTRACT: To compare perioperative outcomes, particularly operative time, between uncontained and in bag power morcellation of uterine tissue at the time of laparoscopic surgery.DesignCanadian Task Force Classification II-3SettingAcademic tertiary care hospitalsPatientsWomen undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy or myomectomy who required morcellation of uterine tissue for specimen extraction.InterventionClinical outcomes among patients who had in bag power morcellation were compared to outcomes among patients who had traditional power morcellation. The technique for in bag morcellation entails placing the specimen into a large containment bag within the abdomen, insufflating the bag within the peritoneal cavity, and then using a power morcellator to remove the specimen from inside of the bag.Main resultsThe cohort consisted of 85 consecutive patients who underwent surgery with morcellation of uterine tissue. Prospective data collected from thirty-six patients who underwent in bag morcellation was compared to retrospective data collected from the immediately preceding 49 patients who had uncontained power morcellation. Baseline demographics were comparable between the two groups, although women who underwent in bag morcellation were on average older than the open morcellation group (mean age in years (SD), 49.19 (1.12) versus 44.06 (8.93); P=0.01). The mean operating room time was longer in the in bag morcellation group (mean time in minutes (SD), 119.0 (55.91) versus 93.13 (44.90); P=0.02). The estimated blood loss, specimen weight, hospital length of stay and perioperative complication rate did not vary between the two groups. Operative times did not vary significantly by surgeon. There were no cases of malignancy or isolation bag disruption.Conclusions In bag power morcellation, a tissue extraction technique developed to reduce the risk of tissue dissemination, results in perioperative outcomes comparable to the traditional laparoscopic approach. In this cohort, mean operative time was prolonged by 26 minutes with in bag morcellation, but may potentially be reduced with further refinement of the technique.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to design and validate a new assessment tool for laparoscopic vaginal cuff suturing in a box trainer. A primary grading tool was constructed including a novel checklist component and a previously validated global rating scale. A four-step validation process was then undertaken. Face validity was determined by a survey of a panel of experts in the field of minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Content validity was assessed via analysis of consistency and variability of the experts' ratings, and items were removed or rephrased according to the experts' comments. Overall, five novices and five expert laparoscopic surgeons were videotaped performing suture closure of a latex vaginal cuff model in a box trainer. The videotapes were reviewed by two raters. Discriminate validity, along with interrater and intrarater reliabilities, was assessed by analysis of the video ratings. The Simulation, Training, Research, and Technology Utilization System center at Brigham and Women's Hospital, a tertiary medical center in Boston, MA. The final assessment tool is presented. We have validated an assessment tool for vaginal cuff suturing in a box trainer. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Surgical Education
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    ABSTRACT: Sera from patients with ovarian cancer contain autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins that are potential biomarkers for early detection. To detect AAb, we probed high-density programmable protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 5,177 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with serous ovarian cancer (n=34 cases/30 controls) and measured bound IgG. Of these, 741 antigens were selected and probed with an independent set of ovarian cancer sera (n=58 cases/60 controls). Twelve potential autoantigens were identified with sensitivities ranging from 13-22% at >93% specificity. These were retested using a Luminex bead arrays using 60 cases and 60 controls, with sensitivities ranging from 0-31.7% at 95% specificity. Three AAb (p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR) had area under the curve (AUC) levels>60% (p<0.01), with the partial AUC (SPAUC) over 5 times greater than for a non-discriminating test (p<0.01). Using a panel of the top three AAb (p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR), if at least two AAb were positive, the sensitivity was 23.3% at 98.3% specificity. AAb to at least one of these top three antigens were also detected in 7/20 sera (35%) of patients with low CA125 levels and 0/15 controls. AAb to p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR are potential biomarkers for the early detection of ovarian cancer.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Proteome Research

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To harmonize the collection of nonsurgical clinical and epidemiologic data relevant to endometriosis research, allowing large-scale collaboration. Design An international collaboration involving 34 clinical/academic centers and three industry collaborators from 16 countries on five continents. Setting In 2013, two workshops followed by global consultation, bringing together 54 leaders in endometriosis research. Patients None. Intervention(s) Development of a self-administered endometriosis patient questionnaire (EPQ), based on [1] systematic comparison of questionnaires from eight centers that collect data from endometriosis cases (and controls/comparison women) on a medium to large scale (publication on >100 cases); [2] literature evidence; and [3] several global consultation rounds. Main Outcome Measure(s) Standard recommended and minimum required questionnaires to capture detailed clinical and covariate data. Result(s) The standard recommended (EPHect EPQ-S) and minimum required (EPHect EPQ-M) questionnaires contain questions on pelvic pain, subfertility and menstrual/reproductive history, hormone/medication use, medical history, and personal information. Conclusion(s) The EPQ captures the basic set of patient characteristics and exposures considered by the WERF EPHect Working Group to be most critical for the advancement of endometriosis research, but is also relevant to other female conditions with similar risk factors and/or symptomatology. The instruments will be reviewed based on feedback from investigators, and—after a first review after 1 year—triannually through systematic follow-up surveys. Updated versions will be made available through http://endometriosisfoundation.org/ephect.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Fertility and Sterility
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To harmonize standard operating procedures (SOPs) and standardize the recording of associated data for collection, processing, and storage of fluid biospecimens relevant to endometriosis. Design An international collaboration involving 34 clinical/academic centers and 3 industry collaborators from 16 countries on 5 continents. Setting In 2013, 2 workshops were conducted, followed by global consultation, bringing together 54 leaders in endometriosis research and sample processing worldwide. Patient(s) None. Intervention(s) Consensus SOPs were based on: [1] systematic comparison of SOPs from 18 global centers collecting fluid samples from women with and without endometriosis on a medium/large scale (publication on >100 cases), [2] literature evidence where available, or consultation with laboratory experts otherwise, and [3] several global consultation rounds. Main Outcome Measure(s) Standard recommended and minimum required SOPs for biofluid collection, processing, and storage in endometriosis research. Result(s) We developed recommended standard and minimum required SOPs for the collection, processing, and storage of plasma, serum, saliva, urine, endometrial/peritoneal fluid, and menstrual effluent, and a biospecimen data-collection form necessary for interpretation of sample-derived results. Conclusion(s) The Endometriosis Phenome and Biobanking Harmonisation Project SOPs allow endometriosis research centers to decrease variability in biofluid sample results, facilitating between-center comparisons and collaborations. The procedures are also relevant to research into other female conditions involving biofluid samples subject to cyclic reproductive influences. The consensus SOPs are based on the best available evidence; areas with limited evidence are identified as requiring further pilot studies. The SOPs will be reviewed based on investigator feedback, and through systematic tri-annual follow-up. Updated versions will be made available at: endometriosisfoundation.org/ephect.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To harmonize standard operating procedures (SOPs) and standardize the recording of associated data for collection, processing, and storage of human tissues relevant to endometriosis. Design An international collaboration involving 34 clinical/academic centers and three industry collaborators from 16 countries on five continents. Setting In 2013, two workshops were conducted followed by global consultation, bringing together 54 leaders in endometriosis research and sample processing from around the world. Patient(s) None. Intervention(s) Consensus SOPs were based on: 1) systematic comparison of SOPs from 24 global centers collecting tissue samples from women with and without endometriosis on a medium or large scale (publication on >100 cases); 2) literature evidence where available, or consultation with laboratory experts otherwise; and 3) several global consultation rounds. Main Outcome Measure(s) Standard recommended and minimum required SOPs for tissue collection, processing, and storage in endometriosis research. Result(s) We developed “recommended standard” and “minimum required” SOPs for the collection, processing, and storage of ectopic and eutopic endometrium, peritoneum, and myometrium, and a biospecimen data collection form necessary for interpretation of sample-derived results. Conclusion(s) The EPHect SOPs allow endometriosis research centers to decrease variability in tissue-based results, facilitating between-center comparisons and collaborations. The procedures are also relevant to research into other gynecologic conditions involving endometrium, myometrium, and peritoneum. The consensus SOPs are based on the best available evidence; areas with limited evidence are identified as requiring further pilot studies. The SOPs will be reviewed based on investigator feedback and through systematic triannual follow-up. Updated versions will be made available at: http://endometriosisfoundation.org/ephect.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Fertility and Sterility

Publication Stats

3k Citations
625.09 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • Emory University
      Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • 2003-2015
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Division of General Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • OB/GYN Epidemiology Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2013
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002-2012
    • Harvard Medical School
      • • Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011
    • Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center
      LEB, New Hampshire, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States
  • 2007
    • Boston University
      • Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2004
    • Beverly Hospital, Boston MA
      BVY, Massachusetts, United States