Amelia J Eisch

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States

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Publications (112)670.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Depression and anxiety involve hippocampal dysfunction, but the specific relationship between these mood disorders and adult hippocampal dentate gyrus neurogenesis remains unclear. In both humans with MDD and rodent models of depression, administration of antidepressants increases DG progenitor and granule cell number, yet rodents with induced ablation of DG neurogenesis typically do not demonstrate depressive- or anxiety-like behaviors. The conflicting data may be explained by the varied duration and degree to which adult neurogenesis is reduced in different rodent neurogenesis ablation models. In order to test this hypothesis we examined how a transient–rather than permanent–inducible reduction in neurogenesis would alter depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Transgenic Nestin-CreERT2/floxed diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA) mice (Cre+DTA+) and littermates (Cre+DTA-; control) were given tamoxifen (TAM) to induce recombination and decrease nestin-expressing stem cells and their progeny. The decreased neurogenesis was transient: 12 days post-TAM Cre+DTA+ mice had fewer DG proliferating Ki67+ cells and fewer DCX+ neuroblasts/immature neurons relative to control, but 30 days post-TAM Cre+DTA+ mice had the same DCX+ cell number as control. This ability of DG neurogenesis to recover after partial ablation also correlated with changes in behavior. Relative to control, Cre+DTA+ mice tested between 12–30 days post-TAM displayed indices of a stress-induced anxiety phenotype–longer latency to consume highly palatable food in the unfamiliar cage in the novelty-induced hypophagia test, and a depression phenotype–longer time of immobility in the tail suspension test, but Cre+DTA+ mice tested after 30 days post-TAM did not. These findings suggest a functional association between adult neurogenesis and stress induced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, where induced reduction in DCX+ cells at the time of behavioral testing is coupled with stress-induced anxiety and a depressive phenotype, and recovery of DCX+ cell number corresponds to normalization of these behaviors.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · PLoS ONE
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Amelia J Eisch · David Petrik

    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    David Petrik · Diane C Lagace · Amelia J Eisch

    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Insights from embryonic development suggest chromatin remodeling is important in adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) maintenance and self-renewal, but this concept has not been fully explored in the adult brain. To assess the role of chromatin remodeling in adult neurogene-sis, we inducibly deleted Brg1—the core subunit of SWI/SNF-like Brg1/Brm-associated factor chromatin remodeling complexes—in nestin-expressing aNSCs and their progeny in vivo and in culture. This resulted in abnormal adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which initially reduced hippocampal aNSCs and progenitor maintenance, and later reduced its responsiveness to physiological stimulation. Mechanistically, deletion of Brg1 appeared to impair cell cycle progression, which is partially due to elevated p53 pathway and p21 expression. Knock-down of p53 rescued the neurosphere growth defects caused by Brg1 deletion. Our results show that epigenetic chromatin remodeling (via a Brg1 and p53/p21-dependent process) determines the aNSCs and progenitor maintenance and responsiveness of neurogenesis. STEM CELLS 2015;33:3655–3665 SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our result reveals the importance of a chromatin remodeling factor, Brg1, in regulation of stem and other dividing cells in the hippocampus, a region in the adult brain important for memory and mood regulation. Notably, although new neurons are generated in the hippocampus and another brain region, termed the SVZ, Brg1 has a distinct role in the hippocampus than has been shown in the SVZ. This work is significant in its advancement of our understanding of how stem and dividing cells are regulated in the body, and these findings have relevance for understanding brain structure and function with regard to development as well as in the adult brain.
    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Insights from embryonic development suggest chromatin remodeling is important in adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) maintenance and self-renewal, but this concept has not been fully explored in the adult brain. To assess the role of chromatin remodeling in adult neurogenesis, we inducibly deleted Brg1-the core subunit of SWI/SNF-like Brg1/Brm-associated factor chromatin remodeling complexes-in nestin-expressing aNSCs and their progeny in vivo and in culture. This resulted in abnormal adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which initially reduced hippocampal aNSCs and progenitor maintenance, and later reduced its responsiveness to physiological stimulation. Mechanistically, deletion of Brg1 appeared to impair cell cycle progression, which is partially due to elevated p53 pathway and p21 expression. Knockdown of p53 rescued the neurosphere growth defects caused by Brg1 deletion. Our results show that epigenetic chromatin remodeling (via a Brg1 and p53/p21-dependent process) determines the aNSCs and progenitor maintenance and responsiveness of neurogenesis. Stem Cells 2015.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Stem Cells
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    ABSTRACT: Myocyte enhancer factor (Mef)-2 transcription factors are implicated in activity-dependent neuronal processes during development, but the role of MEF2 in neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the adult brain is unknown. We used a transgenic mouse in which Mef2a, -c, and -d were inducibly deleted in adult nestin-expressing NSPCs and their progeny. Recombined cells in the hippocampal granule cell layer were visualized and quantified by yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expression. In control mice, postmitotic neurons expressed Mef2a, -c, and -d, whereas type 1 stem cells and proliferating progenitors did not. Based on this expression, we hypothesized that Mef2a, -c, and -d deletion in adult nestin-expressing NSPCs and their progeny would result in fewer mature neurons. Control mice revealed an increase in YFP(+) neurons and dendrite formation over time. Contrary to our hypothesis, inducible Mef2 KO mice also displayed an increase in YFP(+) neurons over time-but with significantly stunted dendrites-suggesting an uncoupling of neuron survival and dendritogenesis. We also found non-cell-autonomous effects after Mef2a, -c, and -d deletion. These in vivo findings indicate a surprising functional role for Mef2a, -c, and -d in cell- and non-cell-autonomous control of adult hippocampal neurogenesis that is distinct from its role during development.-Latchney, S. E., Jiang, Y., Petrik, D. P., Eisch, A. J., Hsieh, J. Inducible knockout of Mef2a, -c, and -d from nestin-expressing stem/progenitor cells and their progeny unexpectedly uncouples neurogenesis and dendritogenesis in vivo.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · The FASEB Journal
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    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Neuroscience Letters
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    ABSTRACT: Addiction has been proposed to emerge from associations between the drug and the reward-associated contexts. This associative learning has a cellular correlate, as there are more cFos+ neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) after psychostimulant conditioned place preference (CPP) vs. saline controls. However, it is unknown whether morphine CPP leads to a similar DG activation, or whether DG activation is due to locomotion, handling, pharmacological effects, or - as data from contextual fear learning suggests - exposure to the drug-associated context. To explore this, we employed an unbiased, counterbalanced, and shortened CPP design that led to place preference and more DG cFos+ cells. Next, mice underwent morphine CPP but were then sequestered into the morphine-paired (conditioned stimulus+ [CS+]) or saline-paired (CS-) context on test day. Morphine-paired mice sequestered to CS+ had ∼30% more DG cFos+ cells than saline-paired mice. Furthermore, Bregma analysis revealed morphine-paired mice had more cFos+ cells in CS+ compared to CS- controls. Notably, there was no significant difference in DG cFos+ cell number after handling alone or after receiving morphine in home cage. Thus, retrieval of morphine-associated context is accompanied by activation of hippocampal DG granule cell neurons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Hippocampus
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    ABSTRACT: Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Nature Communications
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    Sarah E Latchney · Amelia J Eisch
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    ABSTRACT: With the growth of the aging population and increasing life expectancy, the diagnosis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases is predicted to increase 12% by 2030. There is urgent need to develop better and novel treatments for disorders like Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases. As these neurodegenerative diseases are customarily defined by the progressive loss of neurons, treatment strategies have traditionally focused on replacing neurons lost during disease progression. To this end, the self-renewing and multipotent properties of neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs) that exist in the adult brain suggest that NSPCs could contribute to a therapy for replacement of damaged or lost neurons. Although a wealth of research demonstrates the proof-of-concept that NSPC transplantation has therapeutic potential, there are considerable barriers between the theory of cell transplantation and clinical implementation. However, a new view on harnessing the power of NSPC for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders has emerged, and focuses on treating neuropathological aspects of the disease prior to the appearance of overt neuronal loss. For example, rather than merely replacing lost neurons, NSPCs are now being considered for their ability to provide trophic support. Here we review the evolution of how the field has considered application of NSPCs for treatment of neurodegeneration disorders. We discuss the challenges posed by the "traditional" view of neurodegeneration - overt cell loss - for utilization of NSPCs for treatment of these disorders. We also review the emergence of an alternative strategy that involves fine-tuning the neurogenic capacity of existing adult NSPCs so that they are engineered to address disease-specific pathologies at specific time points during the trajectory of disease. We conclude with our opinion that for this strategy to become a translational reality, it requires a thorough understanding of NSPCs, the dynamic process of adult neurogenesis, and a better understanding of the pathological trajectory of each neurodegenerative disease.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and developmental delay. In addition to cognitive dysfunction, DS patients are marked by diminished neurogenesis, a neuropathological feature also found in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Interestingly, manipulations that enhance neurogenesis-like environmental enrichment or pharmacological agents-improve cognition in Ts65Dn mice. P7C3 is a proneurogenic compound that enhances hippocampal neurogenesis, cell survival, and promotes cognition in aged animals. However, this compound has not been tested in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. We hypothesized that P7C3 treatment would reverse or ameliorate the neurogenic deficits in Ts65Dn mice. To test this, adult Ts65Dn and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were administered vehicle or P7C3 twice daily for 3 months. After 3 months, brains were examined for indices of neurogenesis, including quantification of Ki67, DCX, activated caspase-3 (AC3), and surviving BrdU-immunoreactive(+) cells in the granule cell layer (GCL) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. P7C3 had no effect on total Ki67+, DCX+, AC3+, or surviving BrdU+ cells in WT mice relative to vehicle. GCL volume was also not changed. In keeping with our hypothesis, however, P7C3-treated Ts65Dn mice had a significant increase in total Ki67+, DCX+, and surviving BrdU+ cells relative to vehicle. P7C3 treatment also decreased AC3+ cell number but had no effect on total GCL volume in Ts65Dn mice. Our findings show 3 months of P7C3 is sufficient to restore the neurogenic deficits observed in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Neuroscience Letters

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Drug and Alcohol Dependence
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    ABSTRACT: The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24h), intermediate (7d), and/or long time points (2-3mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support the regenerative capacity of the adult SGZ after HZE particle exposure and encourage additional inquiry into the relationship between radial glia stem cells and cognitive function after HZE particle exposure.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Life sciences and space research

Publication Stats

10k Citations
670.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001-2015
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Dallas, Texas, United States
  • 2011
    • Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Los Ángeles, California, United States
  • 2004-2009
    • University of Texas at Dallas
      • Molecular Biology
      Richardson, Texas, United States
  • 2005
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • Swansea University
      Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 2000-2001
    • Yale-New Haven Hospital
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • 1999-2001
    • Yale University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States