Paul W Jones

University of London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (133)733.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although the age range of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is broad, few studies have focused on the effects of age on disease characteristics. Keio University and affiliated hospitals established an observational COPD cohort. Patients were assessed using high resolution computed tomography (CT) to quantify emphysema, health status using the COPD assessment test (CAT) and the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), spirometry, echocardiogram, dual X-ray absorption of bone, biomarkers and comorbid diagnoses. We examined the characteristics of COPD patients aged 75 and over compared with patients below 75. A total of 443 patients comprising 252 patients aged <75 years and 191 patients aged ≥75 years, were enrolled. Emphysematous changes on CT and prevalence of possible pulmonary hypertension were greater in late-elderly patients. The slope of the relationship between CT emphysema densitometry score and forced expiratory volume in 1 s was significantly less steep in the late-elderly than the younger patients (p = 0.002). CAT and total SGRQ scores and the frequency of long-term oxygen therapy were significantly higher in the late-elderly with moderate airflow obstruction compared to those of the younger in the same grade, although the opposite was seen in late-elderly patients with very severe airflow obstruction. Hypertension, aortic aneurysm, prostatic hypertrophy, anemia, and cataract are more prevalent in late-elderly patients. Elderly COPD patients show a varied age-related pattern of disease that warrants specific attention in clinical practice above and beyond assessment of airflow limitation. Trial registration Clinical trial registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN000003470, April 10, 2010)
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2016 · BMC Research Notes
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: We performed a review of studies of fluticasone propionate (FP)/salmeterol (SAL) (combination inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA)) in patients with COPD, which measured baseline (pretreatment) blood eosinophil levels, to test whether blood eosinophil levels ≥2% were associated with a greater reduction in exacerbation rates with ICS therapy. Methods: Three studies of ≥1-year duration met the inclusion criteria. Moderate and severe exacerbation rates were analysed according to baseline blood eosinophil levels (<2% vs ≥2%). At baseline, 57-75% of patients had ≥2% blood eosinophils. Changes in FEV1 and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores were compared by eosinophil level. Results: For patients with ≥2% eosinophils, FP/SAL was associated with significant reductions in exacerbation rates versus tiotropium (INSPIRE: n=719, rate ratio (RR)=0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.92, p=0.006) and versus placebo (TRISTAN: n=1049, RR=0.63, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.79, p<0.001). No significant difference was seen in the <2% eosinophil subgroup in either study (INSPIRE: n=550, RR=1.18, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.51, p=0.186; TRISTAN: n=354, RR=0.99, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.47, p=0.957, respectively). In SCO30002 (n=373), no significant effects were observed (FP or FP/SAL vs placebo). No relationship was observed in any study between eosinophil subgroup and treatment effect on FEV1 and SGRQ. Discussion: Baseline blood eosinophil levels may represent an informative marker for exacerbation reduction with ICS/LABA in patients with COPD and a history of moderate/severe exacerbations.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Thorax
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    ABSTRACT: Inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist combination therapy is recommended in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients at high risk of exacerbations. The EFFECT (Efficacy of Fluticasone propionate/FormotErol in COPD Treatment) trial is a Phase III, 52-week, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two doses of fluticasone propionate/formoterol compared to formoterol monotherapy in COPD patients with FEV1 ≤50% predicted and a history of exacerbations. The primary endpoint is the annualized rate of moderate and severe exacerbations. Secondary endpoints include pre-dose FEV1, EXACT-PRO (EXAcerbations of Chronic pulmonary disease Tool - Patient-Reported Outcome)-defined exacerbations, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire for COPD, COPD Assessment Test, and EXACT-Respiratory Symptoms total score. Lung-specific biomarkers (surfactant protein D and CC chemokine ligand-18) will be measured in a subset of patients to explore their relationship to other clinical indices in COPD and their predictive utility. Pneumonia will be diagnosed per criteria defined by the British Thoracic Society community acquired pneumonia guideline, primarily by radiological confirmation and, additionally, using clinical criteria when a chest radiograph cannot be obtained. Serial measurements of serum potassium, vital signs and electrocardiograms, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 24-hour urinary cortisol measurement will be performed in a subset of patients in addition to conventional safety assessments.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of COPD
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Patients with COPD are characterised by a reduced health status, which can be easily assessed by the COPD Assessment Test (CAT). Previous studies show that health status can be worsened by the presence of comorbidities. However, the impact of cardiovascular comorbidities on health status as assessed with CAT is not sufficiently investigated. Therefore, the current study has the following objectives: (1) to study the clinical, (patho)physiological and psychosocial determinants of the CAT, and impact of previously established and/or newly diagnosed cardiovascular comorbidities on health status in tertiary care patients with COPD; (2) to assess the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation on CAT scores in patients with COPD; (3) to develop reference values for the CAT in Dutch elderly patients without COPD; and (4) to validate the CAT in a broad sample of Dutch patients with COPD. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The COPD, Health status and Comorbidities (Chance) study is a monocentre study consisting of an observational cross-sectional part and a longitudinal part. Demographic and clinical characteristics will be assessed in primary care, secondary care and tertiary care patients with COPD, and in patients without COPD. To assess health status, the CAT, Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) will be used. The longitudinal part consists of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation programme in 500 tertiary care patients. For the cross-sectional part of the study, 150 patients without COPD, 100 primary care patients and 100 secondary care patients will be assessed during a single home visit. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The Medical Ethical Committee of the Maastricht University Medical Centre+ (MUMC+), Maastricht, the Netherlands (METC 11-3-070), has approved this study. The study has been registered at the Dutch Trial Register (NTR 3416).
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · BMJ Open
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) research statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes. Copyright ©ATS/ERS 2015.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · European Respiratory Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarized, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of COPD as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS Research Statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centered outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
  • Paul W Jones
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    ABSTRACT: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have important consequences for lung function, health status and mortality. Furthermore, they are associated with high economic costs, predominantly related to hospitalization. They are managed acutely with short-acting bronchodilators, systemic corticosteroids or antibiotics; however, a large proportion of COPD exacerbations are unreported and therefore untreated or self-managed. There is evidence to suggest that these unreported exacerbations also have important consequences for health status; therefore, reducing exacerbation risk is an important goal in the management of COPD. Current guidelines recommend long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) as first-line bronchodilator therapy in patients with stable COPD who have a high risk of exacerbation or increased symptoms. To date, three LAMAs, tiotropium bromide, aclidinium bromide and glycopyrronium bromide, have been approved as maintenance bronchodilator treatments for stable COPD. These all provide clinically significant improvements in lung function, reduce symptoms and improve health status compared with placebo in patients with COPD. This paper reviews evidence from randomized, controlled clinical trials demonstrating that tiotropium, aclidinium and glycopyrronium reduce exacerbation risk in patients with COPD. Reductions were seen irrespective of the exacerbation measure used, whether time to first event or annualized exacerbation rate. Furthermore, studies with aclidinium suggest LAMAs can reduce exacerbation risk irrespective of whether exacerbation events are assessed, using an event-based approach or a symptom-based method which includes unreported events. Together these results demonstrate that LAMAs have the potential to provide clinical benefit in the management of exacerbations in patients with stable COPD. © The Author(s), 2015.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease
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    ABSTRACT: Background A meta-analysis of published data was conducted to investigate the overall risks of hypertension and QTc prolongation in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were receiving vandetanib. Methods A computerized search through electronic databases, including PubMed and Embase (until Dec 2014), was performed to obtain eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared hypertension and/or QTc prolongation profile of vandetanib alone or plus chemotherapy with control groups (placebo, single targeted therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of them) in patients with advanced NSCLC. The outcome measures were the overall risks of hypertension and QTc prolongation. Relative risk (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) were calculated and pooled using a random effects model. Results A total of nine RCTs, which involved 4813 patients, were enrolled in the present study. A significant increase in risk was observed for all-grade hypertension (RR 5.58; 95 % CI 4.16 to 7.48; P < 0.00001) and grade ≥3 hypertension (RR 4.79; 95 % CI 2.31 to 9.93; P < 0.0001) in advanced NSCLC patients who were receiving vandetanib compared with the controls. Moreover, vandetanib significantly prolonged all-grade QTc interval (RR 7.90; 95 % CI 4.03 to 15.50; P < 0.00001) and grade ≥3 QTc interval (RR 3.12; 95 % CI 1.01 to 9.63; P = 0.05). Conclusions Current evidence showed that significant risks in developing hypertension and QTc prolongation exist in advanced NSCLC patients who were receiving vandetanib. Thus, appropriate monitoring and management of these events are recommended.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Thorax
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    Paul W. Jones
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    ABSTRACT: Three long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are now available in Europe, providing clinicians and patients with a choice of interventions, which is important in COPD, which is clinically a heterogeneous disease. The first LAMA, tiotropium, has been widely used over the last decade as a once-daily maintenance therapy in stable COPD to improve patients' health-related quality of life and to reduce the risk of exacerbations. Administered via the HandiHaler (R) device, it is safe and well tolerated. Another new once-daily LAMA, glycopyrronium, has also been shown to improve health status and reduce exacerbations, and is well tolerated. The subject of this review is a third LAMA, aclidinium bromide, which was approved as a twice-daily maintenance bronchodilator treatment. In the pivotal Phase III clinical trials, patients receiving aclidinium achieved significantly greater improvements in lung function, reductions in breathlessness, and improvements in health status compared with placebo, for up to 24 weeks. In continuation studies, these improvements were sustained for up to 52 weeks. Pooled data showed exacerbation frequency was significantly reduced with aclidinium versus placebo. Preclinical and pharmacological studies demonstrating low systemic bioavailability and a low propensity to induce cardiac arrhythmias were translated into a favorable tolerability profile in the clinical trial program - the adverse event profile of aclidinium was similar to placebo, with a low incidence of anticholinergic and cardiac adverse events. While additional studies are needed to evaluate its full clinical potential, aclidinium is an important part of this recent expansion of LAMA therapeutic options, providing clinicians and patients with an effective and well-tolerated COPD treatment.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · International Journal of COPD
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Previous studies on chronic bronchitis (CB) have used varying definitions. We sought to compare an alternative CB definition using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, a commonly used assessment tool, with the classic definition and to investigate if it had independent or additive value. Methods: We analyzed data from 4513 GOLD 1-4 subjects in the COPDGene cohort. We compared the classic definition of CB with the SGRQ definition, defined by their answers to the questions about both cough and phlegm. We compared the Classic CB+ vs. CB- groups, and the SGRQ CB+ and CB- groups. We also analyzed the cohort split into four groups: Classic CB+/SGRQ CB+, Classic CB+/SGRQ CB-, Classic CB-/SGRQ CB+, Classic CB-/SGRQ CB-. Results: 26.1% were Classic CB+, whereas 39.9% were SGRQ CB+. When the SGRQ definition was compared with the Classic CB definition, using this as the gold standard, the SGRQ CB definition had a sensitivity and specificity of 0.87 and 0.77, respectively. The SGRQ CB+ and Classic CB+ groups were strikingly similar with more respiratory symptoms, exacerbations, worse lung function, and greater airway wall thickness. In addition, the Classic CB+/SGRQ CB+, Classic CB+/SGRQ CB-, Classic CB-/SGRQ CB+ groups shared similar characteristics as well. Conclusions: The SGRQ CB definition identifies more subjects with chronic cough and sputum that share a similar phenotype identified by the Classic CB definition. The addition of the SGRQ CB definition to the classic one can be used to identify more COPD patients at risk for poor outcomes.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale: Radiographically-confirmed pneumonia risk has not been assessed with inhaled corticosteroid use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: To determine the incidence of pneumonia, risk factors and clinical attributes with inhaled fluticasone furoate in COPD patients with an exacerbation history. Methods: Two replicate, 1-year, double-blind clinical trials enrolled COPD subjects with moderate to very severe airflow limitation and at least one exacerbation in the prior year. Subjects were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive inhaled once-daily vilanterol 25 µg or vilanterol 25 µg combined with 50 µg, 100 µg, or 200 µg fluticasone furoate. Subjects were required to have a chest radiograph at screening and within 48 hours of any suspected pneumonia or exacerbation. Measurements and Main Results: Of 3255 randomized subjects, 205 pneumonia events occurred in 181 subjects. Chest imaging was available for 195 (95%) of these events. Chest radiographs were also obtained for 1793 (70%) of the 2545 moderate and severe exacerbations. For vilanterol alone and the combination with 50 µg, 100 µg, or 200 µg fluticasone furoate, reported pneumonia incidence was 3%, 6%, 6% and 7%, respectively. However, for events with compatible parenchymal infiltrates, respective incidences were 2%, 4%, 4% and 5%. Factors associated with at least a two-fold increase in the risk of pneumonia with FF/VI were being a current smoker, having prior pneumonia, BMI < 25kg/m2, and severe airflow limitation. Conclusions: Although the incidence of pneumonia is low, radiographically-confirmed pneumonia risk is increased with inhaled FF/VI, although lower than investigator-defined rates. Clinical trial registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01009463 (HZC102871); NCT01017952 (HZC102970).
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Aclidinium/formoterol is a twice-daily (BID) fixed-dose combination (FDC) in development for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The efficacy and safety of aclidinium/formoterol versus monotherapy and placebo in patients with COPD was assessed. In this 24-week double-blind, parallel-group, active- and placebo-controlled, multicentre Phase III study, patients (>=40 years, post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]/forced vital capacity <70% and FEV1 >=30% but <80% predicted normal) were randomised 2:2:2:2:1 to aclidinium/formoterol 400/12 mug (n = 385) or 400/6 mug (n = 381), aclidinium 400 mug (n = 385), formoterol 12 mug (n = 384) or placebo (n = 194) BID via Genuair(R)/Pressair(R)a. At Week 24, aclidinium/formoterol 400/12 mug and 400/6 mug lead to significant improvements from baseline in 1-hour post-dose FEV1 versus aclidinium (125 mL [95% CI: 90, 160; p < 0 . 001] and 69 mL [95% CI: 34, 105; p < 0.001], respectively) and trough FEV1 versus formoterol (85 mL [95% CI: 51, 119; p < 0.001] and 53 mL [95% CI: 19, 87; p < 0.01], respectively; co-primary endpoints). Additionally, aclidinium/formoterol 400/12 mug and 400/6 mug provided significant improvements in Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) focal score versus placebo (1.29 units [95% CI: 0.73, 1.86; p < 0.001] and 1.16 units [95% CI: 0.59, 1.73; p < 0.001], respectively; secondary endpoint). All treatments were well tolerated, with safety profiles of the FDCs similar to those of placebo and monotherapy. Both aclidinium/formoterol BID doses significantly improved bronchodilation versus monotherapy, and dyspnoea versus placebo, with no increase in safety risk. Aclidinium/formoterol may be an effective treatment for patients with COPD.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01462942.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · BMC Pulmonary Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background Symptomatic relief is an important treatment goal for patients with COPD. To date, no diary for evaluating respiratory symptoms in clinical trials has been developed and scientifically-validated according to FDA and EMA guidelines. The EXACT ¿ Respiratory Symptoms (E-RS) scale is a patient-reported outcome (PRO) measure designed to address this need. The E-RS utilizes 11 respiratory symptom items from the existing and validated 14-item EXACT, which measures symptoms of exacerbation. The E-RS total score quantifies respiratory symptom severity, and 3 domains assess breathlessness, cough and sputum, and chest symptoms.Methods This study examined the performance of the E-RS in each of 3 controlled trials with common and unique validation variables: one 6-month (N¿=¿235, US) and two 3-month (N¿=¿749; N¿=¿597; international). Subjects completed the E-RS as part of a daily eDiary. Tests of reliability, validity, and responsiveness were conducted in each dataset.ResultsIn each study, RS-Total score was internally consistent (Cronbach ¿) (0.88, 0.92, 0.92) and reproducible (intra-class correlation) in stable patients (2 days apart: 0.91; 7 days apart: 0.71, 0.74). RS-Total scores correlated significantly with the following criterion variables (Spearman¿s rho; p¿<¿0.01, all comparisons listed here): FEV1% predicted (¿0.19, ¿0.14, ¿0.15); St. George¿s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) (0.65, 0.52, 0.51); Breathlessness, Cough, and Sputum Scale (BCSS) (0.89, 0.89); modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea scale (mMRC) (0.40); rescue medication use (0.43, 0.42); Functional Performance Inventory Short-Form (FPI-SF) (0.43); 6-minute walk distance (6-MWT) (¿0.30, ¿0.14) and incremental shuttle walk (ISWT) (¿0.18) tests. Correlations between these variables and RS-Breathlessness, RS-Cough and Sputum, RS-Chest Symptoms scores supported subscale validity. RS-Total, RS-Breathlessness, and RS-Chest Symptoms differentiated mMRC levels of breathlessness severity (p¿<¿0.0001). RS-Total and domain scores differentiated subjects with no rescue medication use and 3 or more puffs (p¿<¿0.0001). Sensitivity to changes in health status (SGRQ), symptoms (BCSS), and exercise capacity (6MWT, ISWT) were also shown and responder definitions using criterion- and distribution-based methods are proposed.Conclusions Results suggest the E-RS is a reliable, valid, and responsive measure of respiratory symptoms of COPD suitable for use in natural history studies and clinical trials.Trial registrationMPEX: NCT00739648; AZ1: NCT00949975; AZ 2: NCT01023516.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Respiratory Research
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Lung volume reduction surgery improves quality of life, exercise capacity, and survival in selected patients but is accompanied by significant morbidity. Bronchoscopic approaches may provide similar benefits with less morbidity. Methods: In a randomized, sham procedure controlled, double-blind trial, 277 subjects were enrolled at 36 centers. Patients had emphysema, airflow obstruction, hyperinflation, and severe dyspnea. The primary effectiveness measure was a significant improvement in disease-related quality of life (St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire) and changes in lobar lung volumes. The primary safety measure was a comparison of serious adverse events. Results: There were 6/121 (5.0%) responders in the treatment group at 6 months, significantly >1/134 (0.7%) in the control group [Bayesian credible intervals (BCI), 0.05%, 9.21%]. Lobar volume changes were significantly different with an average decrease in the treated lobes of -224mL compared with -17mL for the control group (BCI, -272, -143). The proportion of responders in St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire was not greater in the treatment group. There were significantly more subjects with a serious adverse event in the treatment group (n=20 or 14.1%) compared with the control group (n=5 or 3.7%) (BCI, 4.0, 17.1), but most were neither procedure nor device related. Conclusions: This trial had technical and statistical success but partial-bilateral endobronchial valve occlusion did not obtain clinically meaningful results. Safety results were acceptable and compare favorably to lung volume reduction surgery and other bronchial valve studies. Further studies need to focus on improved patient selection and a different treatment algorithm.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology
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    Paul W Jones

    Preview · Article · Oct 2014 · European Respiratory Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The frequency and impact of exacerbations identified using healthcare resource utilisation (HCRU) or the EXAcerbations of Chronic pulmonary disease Tool (EXACT) were compared prospectively in a 24-week, phase III trial (ATTAIN). Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease received twice-daily aclidinium 200 μg, aclidinium 400 μg or placebo. All HCRU events were reported to physicians. "EXACT-identified" events were categorised as "EXACT-reported" (detected by EXACT and reported to the physician) and "EXACT-unreported" (detected but not reported). Health status was measured using the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Annualised EXACT-identified event rates were higher in all study arms (placebo 1.39, aclidinium 200 μg 1.00 and aclidinium 400 μg 0.98 per patient per year) versus HCRU (placebo 0.60, aclidinium 200 μg 0.43 and aclidinium 400 μg 0.40 per patient per year). Concordance between methods was low (kappa 0.16). Aclidinium reduced EXACT-identified events (rate ratio versus placebo: aclidinium 200 μg 0.72 and aclidinium 400 μg 0.71; both p<0.05); HCRU events were similarly reduced. At week 24, SGRQ scores improved (-6.6 versus baseline) in patients with no event during weeks 1-12; improvements were significantly smaller in patients with HCRU events (-3.4; p = 0.036) or EXACT-unreported events (-3.0; p = 0.002). Unreported events were more frequent than reported events. Both had similar negative impact on health status. Aclidinium reduced the frequency of both types of event.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · European Respiratory Journal
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    Paul W Jones

    Preview · Article · Sep 2014 · European Respiratory Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Background The tradition classification of the severity of COPD, based on spirometry, fails to encompass the heterogeneity of the disease. The COPD assessment test (CAT), a multi-dimensional, patient-filled questionnaire, assesses the overall health status of patients, and is recommended as part of the assessment of individuals with COPD. However, information regarding the range of values for the test in a non-COPD population (normative values) is limited, and consequently, knowledge regarding the optimal cut-off, and the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) for the test remain largely empirical. Methods CanCOLD is a population-based multi-center cohort study conducted across Canada, the methodology of which is based on the international BOLD initiative. The study includes subjects with COPD, at-risk individuals who smoke, and healthy control subjects. CAT questionnaires were administered at baseline to all subjects. Among non-COPD subjects, normative values for the CAT questionnaire, and psychometric properties of the test were characterized. Predictors of high CAT scores were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of the 525 non-COPD subjects enrolled, 500 were included in the analysis. Mean FEV1/FVC ratio among the 500 included subjects was 0.77 (SD 0.49); the mean predicted FEV1 was 99.38% (SD 16.88%). The overall mean CAT score was 6 (SD 5.09); scores were higher among females (6.43, SD 5.59), and subjects over 80 years of age (mean 7.58, SD 6.82). Cronbach alpha for the CAT was 0.79, suggesting a high internal consistency for the test. A score of 16 was the 95th percentile for the population, and 27 subjects (5.4%) were found to have a CAT score > =16. Current smoking (aOR 3.41, 95% CI 1.05, 11.02), subject-reported physician-diagnosed asthma (aOR 7.59, 95% CI 2.71, 21.25) and musculoskeletal disease (aOR 4.09, 95% CI 1.72, 9.71) were found to be significantly associated with a score ≥16. Conclusions The characterization of CAT scores in the general population will be useful for norm-based comparisons. Longitudinal follow-up of these subjects will help in the optimization of cut-offs for the test.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Respiratory Research
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    ABSTRACT: Background and objectives Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) commonly coexist and share common risk factors. The prevalence of COPD in outpatients with a smoking history and CVD in Japan is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of Japanese patients with a smoking history being treated for CVD who have concurrent airflow limitation compatible with COPD. A secondary objective was to test whether the usage of lung function tests performed in the clinic influenced the diagnosis rate of COPD in the patients identified with airflow limitation. Methods In a multicenter observational prospective study conducted at 17 centers across Japan, the prevalence of airflow limitation compatible with COPD (defined as forced expiratory volume (FEV)1/FEV6 <0.73, by handheld spirometry) was investigated in cardiac outpatients ≥40 years old with a smoking history who routinely visited the clinic for their CVD. Each patient completed the COPD Assessment Test prior to spirometry testing. Results Data were available for 995 patients with a mean age of 66.6±10.0 years, of whom 95.5% were male. The prevalence of airflow limitation compatible with COPD was 27.0% (n=269), and 87.7% of those patients (n=236) did not have a prior diagnosis of COPD. The prevalence of previously diagnosed airflow limitation was higher in sites with higher usage of lung function testing (14.0%, 15.2% respectively) compared against sites where it is performed seldom (11.1%), but was still low. Conclusion The prevalence of airflow limitation in this study indicates that a quarter of outpatients with CVD have COPD, almost all of whom are undiagnosed. This suggests that it is important to look routinely for COPD in CVD outpatients.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · International Journal of COPD
  • Paul W Jones

    No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · The Lancet Respiratory Medicine

Publication Stats

7k Citations
733.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • University of London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2000-2015
    • St George's, University of London
      • Division of Clinical Sciences
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • University of Glasgow
      • Division of Biological Sciences
      Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • 2014
    • St. George's School
      Middletown, Rhode Island, United States
  • 2013
    • University of Michigan
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 2007
    • Brunel University London
      अक्सब्रिज, England, United Kingdom
  • 2003
    • Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
      Liverpool, England, United Kingdom
  • 2001
    • University of Zurich
      Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland