Stéphanie Beauseigle

Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (4)17.53 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The introduction and establishment of non-native plant pathogens into new areas can result in severe outbreaks. Septoria leaf spot and canker caused by Sphaerulina musiva is one of the most damaging poplar diseases in northeastern and north-central North America. Stem and branch cankers can be devastating on susceptible trees, leading to tree death and reduced biomass in commercial plantations. In the Pacific Northwest region of North America, the first report of the disease was made in 2006 in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia (BC), Canada. To investigate the incidence and distribution of S. musiva from its point of introduction into BC, five plantations of Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood), 500 P. trichocarpa trees from natural populations, and 23 plantations of hybrid poplars were surveyed by using real-time PCR assays targeting S. musiva and its native sister species, S. populicola. Our survey suggests a strong anthropogenic signature to the emergence of the non-native S. musiva. Detection frequency of S. musiva was high in hybrid poplar plantations (116 trees infected, 54.2 % of the sampled trees), while detection of the native S. populicola was limited to 13.1 % (22 trees infected). By contrast, in natural stands of P. trichocarpa, less than 2 % of the trees were positive for S. musiva (7 trees) while ~75 % were positive for S. populicola (433 trees). All the S. musiva detections in natural stands of the native P. trichocarpa were from trees located in the vicinity (<2.5 km) of hybrid poplar plantations. Identification of the genotypes found in the hybrid poplar plantations revealed that they are in majority F1 progeny from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides (T × D) (82 %) and P. nigra × P. maximowiczii (N × M) (7.8 %) crosses, which are generally susceptible (intermediate level of susceptibility between the two parental species) to the canker disease. Our results suggest that the emergence of S. musiva in BC is related to the planting of susceptible hybrid poplars. Even if the disease has not yet established itself in natural poplar populations outside of the Fraser Valley, infected plantations could act as a reservoir that could promote its spread into nearby native P. trichocarpa populations. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10530-015-1051-8/fulltext.html
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Biological Invasions
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    ABSTRACT: Some of the most damaging tree pathogens can attack woody stems, causing lesions (cankers) that may be lethal. To identify the genomic determinants of wood colonization leading to canker formation, we sequenced the genomes of the poplar canker pathogen, Mycosphaerella populorum, and the closely related poplar leaf pathogen, M. populicola. A secondary metabolite cluster unique to M. populorum is fully activated following induction by poplar wood and leaves. In addition, genes encoding hemicellulose-degrading enzymes, peptidases, and metabolite transporters were more abundant and were up-regulated in M. populorum growing on poplar wood-chip medium compared with M. populicola. The secondary gene cluster and several of the carbohydrate degradation genes have the signature of horizontal transfer from ascomycete fungi associated with wood decay and from prokaryotes. Acquisition and maintenance of the gene battery necessary for growth in woody tissues and gene dosage resulting in gene expression reconfiguration appear to be responsible for the adaptation of M. populorum to infect, colonize, and cause mortality on poplar woody stems.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Some of the most damaging tree pathogens can attack woody stems, causing lesions (cankers) that may be lethal. To identify the genomic determinants of wood colonization leading to canker formation, we sequenced the genomes of the poplar canker pathogen, Mycosphaerella populorum, and the closely related poplar leaf pathogen, M. populicola. A secondary metabolite cluster unique to M. populorum is fully activated following induction by poplar wood and leaves. In addition, genes encoding hemicellulose-degrading enzymes, peptidases, and metabolite transporters were more abundant and were up-regulated in M. populorum growing on poplar wood-chip medium compared with M. populicola. The secondary gene cluster and several of the carbohydrate degradation genes have the signature of horizontal transfer from ascomycete fungi associated with wood decay and from prokaryotes. Acquisition and maintenance of the gene battery necessary for growth in woody tissues and gene dosage resulting in gene expression reconfiguration appear to be responsible for the adaptation of M. populorum to infect, colonize, and cause mortality on poplar woody stems.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Marker-assisted selection holds promise for highly influencing tree breeding, especially for wood traits, by considerably reducing breeding cycles and increasing selection accuracy. In this study, we used a candidate gene approach to test for associations between 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers from 549 candidate genes and 25 wood quality traits in white spruce. A mixed-linear model approach, including a weak but nonsignificant population structure, was implemented for each marker-trait combination. Relatedness among individuals was controlled using a kinship matrix estimated either from the known half-sib structure or from the markers. Both additive and dominance effect models were tested. Between 8 and 21 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found to be significantly associated (P ≤ 0.01) with each of earlywood, latewood, or total wood traits. After controlling for multiple testing (Q ≤ 0.10), 13 SNPs were still significant across as many genes belonging to different families, each accounting for between 3 and 5% of the phenotypic variance in 10 wood characters. Transcript accumulation was determined for genes containing SNPs associated with these traits. Significantly different transcript levels (P ≤ 0.05) were found among the SNP genotypes of a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, a β-tonoplast intrinsic protein, and a long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 9. These results should contribute toward the development of efficient marker-assisted selection in an economically important tree species.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the potential value of high-throughput genotyping assays in the analysis of large and complex genomes, we designed two highly multiplexed Illumina bead arrays using the GoldenGate SNP assay for gene mapping in white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) and black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.). Each array included 768 SNPs, identified by resequencing genomic DNA from parents of each mapping population. For white spruce and black spruce, respectively, 69.2% and 77.1% of genotyped SNPs had valid GoldenGate assay scores and segregated in the mapping populations. For each of these successful SNPs, on average, valid genotyping scores were obtained for over 99% of progeny. SNP data were integrated to pre-existing ALFP, ESTP, and SSR markers to construct two individual linkage maps and a composite map for white spruce and black spruce genomes. The white spruce composite map contained 821 markers including 348 gene loci. Also, 835 markers including 328 gene loci were positioned on the black spruce composite map. In total, 215 anchor markers (mostly gene markers) were shared between the two species. Considering lineage divergence at least 10 Myr ago between the two spruces, interspecific comparison of homoeologous linkage groups revealed remarkable synteny and marker colinearity. The design of customized highly multiplexed Illumina SNP arrays appears as an efficient procedure to enhance the mapping of expressed genes and make linkage maps more informative and powerful in such species with poorly known genomes. This genotyping approach will open new avenues for co-localizing candidate genes and QTLs, partial genome sequencing, and comparative mapping across conifers.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2008 · BMC Genomics
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    ABSTRACT: A composite linkage map was constructed from four individual maps for the conifer Picea glauca (Moench) Voss, from anonymous and gene-specific markfers (714 AFLPs, 38 SSRs, and 53 ESTPs). A total of 12 linkage groups were delineated with an average marker density of 2.7 cM. Macro-synteny and macro-colinearity comparisons with two other composite linkage maps developed for the species complex P. mariana (Mill.) B.S.P. × P. rubens Sarg., and for P. abies (L.) Karst. revealed an identical number of linkage groups and a remarkable conservation of the gene content and gene order of linkage groups over the million years since the split between these taxa. Identical gene order among taxa was observed for 10 of the 12 assembled composite linkage groups. The discovery of one breakdown in synteny between P. glauca and the other two taxa indicated the occurrence of an inter-chromosomal rearrangement involving an insertional translocation. Analysis of marker colinearity also revealed a putative segmental duplication. The combined information from these three Picea genomes validated and improved large-scale genome comparisons at the inter-generic level in the family Pinaceae by allowing for the identification of 11 homoeologous linkage groups between Picea and Pinus, and nine such groups between Picea and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Notably, the analysis of synteny among the three genera revealed a putative case of chromosomal fission and an inter-chromosomal rearrangement in the genome of P. menziesii. Both of these changes are inter-connected, indicating much instability in this part of the P. menziesii genome. Overall, the macro-structure of the Pinaceae genome was well conserved, which is notable given the Cretaceous origin of its main lineages.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2006 · Theoretical and Applied Genetics
  • Betty Pelgas · Jean Bousquet · Stéphanie Beauseigle · Nathalie Isabel
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    ABSTRACT: Four individual linkage maps were constructed from two crosses for the species complex Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P. × Picea rubens Sarg in order to integrate their information into a composite map and to compare with other Pinaceae. For all individual linkage maps, 12 major linkage groups were recovered with 306 markers per map on average. Before building the composite linkage map, the common male parent between the two crosses made it possible to construct a reference linkage map to validate the relative position of homologous markers. The final composite map had a length of 2,319 cM (Haldane) and contained a total of 1,124 positioned markers, including 1,014 AFLPs, 3 RAPDs, 53 SSRs, and 54 ESTPs, assembled into 12 major linkage groups. Marker density of the composite map was statistically homogenous and was much higher (one marker every 2.1 cM) than that of the individual linkage maps (one marker every 5.7 to 7.1 cM). Synteny was well conserved between individual, reference, and composite linkage maps and 94% of homologous markers were colinear between the reference and composite maps. The combined information from the two crosses increased by about 24% the number of anchor markers compared to the information from any single cross. With a total number of 107 anchor markers (SSRs and ESTPs), the composite linkage map is a useful starting point for large-scale genome comparisons at the intergeneric level in the Pinaceae. Comparisons of this map with those in Pinus and Pseudotsuga allowed the identification of one breakdown in synteny where one linkage group homoeologous to both Picea and Pinus corresponded to two linkage groups in Pseudotsuga. Implications for the evolution of the Pinaceae genome are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2005 · Theoretical and Applied Genetics

Publication Stats

229 Citations
17.53 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008
    • Laval University
      Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
  • 2006
    • Université du Québec
      Québec, Quebec, Canada
  • 2005
    • Centre d'enseignement et de recherche en foresterie de Sainte-Foy
      Quebec City, Quebec, Canada