Rachel F Rodgers

Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (98)159.4 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: L’addiction à Internet ou l’utilisation problématique d’Internet a été régulièrement associée à de nombreux troubles psychiatriques. Cependant, peu d’études se sont intéressées à la relation entre l’utilisation d’Internet et les traits de personnalité. Notre objectif principal était donc d’explorer la relation entre l’utilisation problématique d’Internet, le temps passé en ligne et les traits de personnalité en prenant en considération la présence de symptômes dépressifs et en distinguant les hommes des femmes. Un échantillon de 276 participants âgés de 18 à 50 ans (M = 28 ; ÉT = 8,9) a été interrogé sur l’utilisation d’Internet, la présence de traits de personnalité et de symptômes dépressifs. Nos résultats ont mis en avant des différences significatives en fonction du genre. Chez les hommes, l’utilisation problématique d’Internet était associée à l’ensemble des traits de personnalité regroupés dans les clusters A (schizoïde et schizotypique) et B (limite et antisociale), alors que chez les femmes aucun trait de personnalité n’était associé à l’utilisation problématique d’Internet. Le temps passé en ligne était notamment prédit par les traits de personnalité schizoïdes chez les hommes et par les traits évitants chez les femmes. Ces résultats suggèrent l’importance d’évaluer l’impact des traits de personnalité sur l’utilisation d’Internet, notamment sur le temps passé en ligne, en distinguant les résultats en fonction du genre et des activités réalisées en ligne.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    Rachel F. Rodgers · Debra L. Franko · Mark Gottlieb · Richard Daynard
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To date, tanning prevention programs have led to limited success. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential unexpected prevention effects of completing an online survey focused on tanning attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge among female college tanners. Methods: A sample of 92 female undergraduate students from the USA, mean age = 20.09, SD = 1.41 years, who engaged in indoor tanning completed an online survey assessing awareness of tanning-related health risks, appearance-based motivations to tan and not to tan, media literacy related to tanning marketing, and tanning behaviors in 2013. Four months later, participants were invited to complete a follow-up survey assessing tanning intentions and behaviors since completing the initial survey. Results: Fifty-one participants (55%) completed the follow-up questions, of whom 43 (84.3%) reported having decreased or ceased engaging in indoor tanning. In addition participants provided comments indicating that completing the survey had lead to decreases in their tanning behaviors. Conclusions: Our study presents novel and compelling support for using brief online surveys for decreasing health-risk behaviors such as sunbed use. Such measures are extremely cost-effective and easy to disseminate and implement. Replication and extension of these findings are warranted.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Participants: Forty-three African-American and Hispanic female students participated in a three-week intervention between January and May 2013. Methods: Participants photographed their meals using their smart phone camera and received motivational text messages three times a day. At baseline, post-intervention and 10 weeks after the intervention, participants reported on fruit, vegetable, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Participants were also weighed at baseline. Results: Among participants with BMI ≥ 25, fruit and vegetable consumption increased with time (p <.01). Among participants with BMI < 21, consumption of fruit decreased (p < .05), while the consumption of vegetables remained stable. No effects were found for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Conclusion: Mobile technology-based interventions could facilitate healthy eating among female ethnic minority college students, particularly those with higher BMI.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of American College Health
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Beliefs surrounding the usefulness of dietary restriction and physical activity as means of body shape and size modification is already present in children as young as 5-years-old, and these beliefs may increase the risk of unhealthy weight control behaviours later in life. To date, however, little is known regarding the development of these beliefs in younger children. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to explore young (aged 3- to 5-years old) children's conceptualisations of dietary restriction and physical activity as means to change body size using a prospective approach. Methods: A sample of 259 children (116 boys, 143 girls) participated in interviews at 3-, 4- and 5-years-old. Participants were shown silhouette figures of a child of their gender and age. Their responses to questions regarding how the figure could return to a previous thinner shape were qualitatively coded using thematic analysis. Results: Children's responses revealed that while, for a subsample, modifications of food, eating, and exercise patterns were the most salient ideas, a number of other mechanisms of body change were also suggested. Responses also evidenced adoption or awareness of stigmatising attitudes towards overweight individuals (over 15 % by age 5). The proportion of children demonstrating an awareness of dietary restriction and physical exercise as methods for body size change increased significantly at each time point. While only 4.2 % demonstrated dieting awareness at 3-years-old, this proportion had risen to almost 28 % by 5-years-old (p < .001). Similarly, the proportion of children aware of exercise as a body change strategy rose from 2.3 to 16.3 % (p < .001), with 22 % of 5-year-olds mentioning general physical activity as a strategy. No gender differences were found. Conclusions: Awareness of dietary restriction and physical exercise as strategies for weight loss and body change emerges as young as 3-years-old, and significantly increases from 3- to 5-years-old. Interventions aiming to promote healthy means of weight control and obesity prevention should consider that certain attitudes may already be present in very young children.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
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    ABSTRACT: Indoor tanning is associated with increased risk of melanoma and is particularly prevalent among female college students in the U.S.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Our aim was to explore the role of parents in the transmission of stereotypical body size attitudes and awareness of weight loss strategies to preschool children. Participants were 279 3-year-old children and their parents, who provided data at baseline and 1 year later. Parents completed self-report body size attitude and dieting measures. Child weight bias and awareness of weight loss strategies were assessed through interview. Over time, negative associations with large bodies and awareness of weight loss strategies increased. Fathers' attitudes prospectively predicted boys' weight bias and awareness of weight loss strategies. Among girls, parental attitudes were less predictive. Findings confirm the importance of fathers in the development of boys' body attitudes and inform prevention programmes.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Developmental Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The purpose of this meta-analytic review was, first, to evaluate the efficacy of Internet-based programs in decreasing eating disorder (ED) symptoms, and, second, to identify moderator variables these effects. Method: Twenty studies were identified and between-group effect sizes were calculated for ED symptoms and risk factors. Results: Compared with control conditions, Internet-based programs successfully decreased body dissatisfaction (d = 0.28, 95% CI [0.15-0.41], p < .001), internalization of the thin ideal (d = 0.36, 95% CI [0.07-0.65], p < .05), shape and weight concern (d = 0.42, 95% CI [0.13-0.71], p < .05), dietary restriction (d = 0.36, 95% CI [0.23-0.49], p < .001), drive for thinness (d = 0.47, 95% CI [0.33-0.60], p < .001), bulimic symptoms (d = 0.31, 95% CI [0.20-0.41], p < .001), purging frequency (d = 0.30, 95% CI [0.02-0.57], p < .05), and negative affect (d = 0.32, 95% CI [0.12-0.52], p < .001). Moderator analyses revealed no impact of data analytic strategy on intervention effects. Similarly, participant risk status was not a moderator for most outcomes. Discussion: Internet-based programs are successful in decreasing ED symptoms and risk factors with small to moderate between-group effect sizes.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Journal of Eating Disorders
  • Johanna Kling · Rachel F Rodgers · Ann Frisén
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    ABSTRACT: Appearance investment has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of body dissatisfaction. Despite this, few studies have explored men's investment in their appearance. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine appearance investment as a prospective predictor of young men's endorsement and pursuit of appearance ideals. A community sample of 187 young men participated in a study at ages 21 and 24. Hierarchical multiple regressions revealed that appearance investment, as hypothesized, was a prospective predictor of increases in leanness orientation, media-ideal internalization, and muscularity behaviors. However, appearance investment did not predict increases in muscularity dissatisfaction. The present findings highlight the importance of including appearance investment in sociocultural models of the development of men's body image, and suggest that appearance investment may be an important target variable to consider when designing body dissatisfaction prevention and intervention programs tailored to young men.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Body image
  • Rachel F. Rodgers · Tiffany Melioli
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence for a relationship between Internet use and body image and eating concerns has started to emerge, however, to date, this literature has not been reviewed. The objective of the present study was, therefore, to review the literature examining the relationship between the use of Internet and social media and body image and eating concerns, and summarize the main findings. Databases were searched for published empirical studies examining the relationship between body image and eating concerns and Internet use. Our search identified 67 studies. The findings indicate the presence of appearance-related content on Internet and social media, including content promoting extreme body shapes or behaviors. The results from qualitative, correlational and experimental studies overall support the relationship between Internet use and body image and eating concerns. The studies identified were grounded in three main theoretical frameworks: sociocultural, objectification theory, and social identity theory; however, other more minor frameworks were also used. The use of Internet, and particularly appearance-focused social media, is associated with heightened body image and eating concerns. Developmental characteristics may make adolescents particularly vulnerable to these effects.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015
  • Rachel F. Rodgers
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    ABSTRACT: The last decade has seen a huge rise in Internet use, including social media, particularly among youth, and preliminary evidence of a relationship between Internet use and increased body image concerns and eating pathology has emerged. However, to date, considerations of theoretical perspectives that might guide this direction of research are lacking. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to provide an analysis of the different theoretical contexts in which Internet use may be studied, and propose an integrative framework for research among adolescents. It reviews five important theoretical models of the development of body image concerns and eating pathology and discusses their usefulness as frameworks within which to explore the relationships between Internet and social media use and body image concerns and eating pathology. Specifically, it critically evaluates sociocultural theory, feminist and self-objectification theory, impression management theory, social identity theory, and gratification theory. Finally, drawing on these five theories, it presents an integrated model and proposes a framework within which to ground research focusing on the relationships between Internet and social media use, and body image concerns and eating pathology. It ends with suggestions for future research among adolescents within the proposed framework.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Psychopathic, narcissistic, Machiavellian, and sadistic traits constitute the Dark Tetrad of personality traits. While this construct has received increasing attention, to our knowledge, there is no typological study aiming to identify homogeneous groups of high-school students based on these traits. The aim of this study was (a) to identify a typology of high-school students based on the Dark Tetrad traits in a community sample and (b) to examine whether these profiles differ on psychopathological variables known to be associated with personality traits. Participants were 615 high-school students who completed self-report questionnaires. Psychopathic, narcissistic, Machiavellian, and sadistic traits were moderately correlated suggesting they may be overlapping but distinct constructs. Cluster analysis yielded four groups: a Low Traits group, a Sadistic–Machiavellian group, a Psychopathic–Narcissistic group, and a high traits group called the Dark Tetrad cluster which was high on all traits. The Dark Tetrad cluster constituted 15% of the total sample and was characterized by the highest levels of antisocial behaviors and suicidal ideations. This study suggests that a significant minority of non-clinical high-school students is characterized by the presence of high levels of the Dark Tetrad traits and self and other-aggression.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Personality and Individual Differences
  • Tiffany Melioli · Rachel F Rodgers · Marie Rodrigues · Henri Chabrol
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to traditional media has been associated with bulimic symptoms. However, to date, little is known regarding the effects of Internet exposure. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships between Internet use and bulimic symptoms within the competing frameworks of sociocultural, impression management, and self-objectification theory. A sample of 289 French women aged 18-25 years completed an online questionnaire assessing bulimic symptoms, body dissatisfaction, body image avoidance, self-surveillance, body shame, and weekly Internet use. Bootstrapping analyses revealed that body shame and body image avoidance mediated the effect of weekly Internet use on bulimic symptoms. Furthermore, when entered into a multiple mediation analysis, these two variables provided independent mediation pathways of equal magnitude. The findings support the usefulness of both the self-objectification and impression management frameworks for investigating the relationship between Internet use and bulimic symptoms. Longitudinal research would help to clarify these pathways further.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
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    ABSTRACT: Clarifying the trajectories of body image and eating concerns in adolescents is critical. We examined longitudinal patterns of development of body dissatisfaction and dietary restriction among early adolescent girls within a sociocultural framework. A sample of 259 school girls (M age = 12.76 years, SD = 0.44) reported on sociocultural influences, body dissatisfaction and dietary restriction at baseline, 8, and 14 months. A subsample provided height and weight. Analyses identified four trajectories of body dissatisfaction: low, moderate-increasing, moderate-decreasing, and high. Three trajectories of dietary restriction emerged: low, moderate, and high. Baseline and 8-month sociocultural variables and BMI differed between the trajectories. A subgroup of girls displays high levels of body image and eating concerns by early adolescence. Sociocultural variables influence these trajectories.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Youth and Adolescence
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Psychopathic, narcissistic, Machiavellian, and sadistic traits constitute the Dark Tetrad of personality traits. While this construct has received increasing attention, to our knowledge, there is no typological study aiming to identify homogeneous groups of high-school students based on these traits. The aim of this study was (a) to identify a typology of high-school students based on the Dark Tetrad traits in a community sample and (b) to examine whether these profiles differ on psychopathological variables known to be associated with personality traits. Participants were 615 high-school students who completed self-report questionnaires. Psychopathic, narcissistic, Machiavellian, and sadistic traits were moderately correlated suggesting they may be overlapping but distinct constructs. Cluster analysis yielded four groups: a Low Traits group, a Sadistic–Machiavellian group, a Psychopathic–Narcissistic group, and a high traits group called the Dark Tetrad cluster which was high on all traits. The Dark Tetrad cluster constituted 15% of the total sample and was characterized by the highest levels of antisocial behaviors and suicidal ideations. This study suggests that a significant minority of non-clinical high-school students is characterized by the presence of high levels of the Dark Tetrad traits and self and other-aggression.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Personality and Individual Differences

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015
  • Rachel F Rodgers · Alice S Lowy · Daniella M Halperin · Debra L Franko
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has indicated that exposure to pro-eating disorder websites might increase eating pathology; however, the magnitude of this effect is unknown. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effect of exposure to pro-eating disorder websites on body image and eating pathology. Studies examining the relationship between exposure to pro-eating disorder websites and eating pathology-related outcomes were included. The systematic review identified nine studies. Findings revealed significant effect sizes of exposure to pro-eating disorder websites on body image dissatisfaction (five studies), d = .41, p = .003; dieting (six studies), d = .68, p < .001, and negative affect (three studies), d = 1.00, p < .001. No effect emerged for bulimic symptoms (four studies), d = .22, p = .73. Findings confirmed the effect of pro-eating disorder websites on body image and eating pathology, highlighting the need for enforceable regulation of these websites. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · European Eating Disorders Review
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    ABSTRACT: We examined whether internalization of sociocultural body ideals mediated the relationship between conformity to masculine norms and drive for muscularity, leanness, and thinness in a sample of males from Sweden, US, UK, and Australia. Over six hundred young men [n=142 (Sweden); n=192 (US); n=141 (UK); n=160 (Australia)] completed an online survey that included assessments of masculine role norms, body image, and internalization of sociocultural body ideals. Path analyses confirmed internalization as a mediator between greater conformity to masculine norms and body image measures (drive for thinness, desire for leanness, and desire for muscularity) across the sample. However, significant cross-country differences in the strength of these mediation effects were found. Mediation effects among US, Australian, and Swedish males were comparable, whereas these effects were weaker in the UK sample. Findings confirmed the importance of internalization of sociocultural body ideals in the tested models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Body image
  • R.F. Rodgers · D.L. Franko
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Introduction Universities are believed to present rich opportunities for eating disorder prevention research. However, the widespread recruitment from psychology subject pools and the attractive compensation offered widens the gap between efficacy trials and effectiveness studies, and raises concerns about the possibility of wide-scale dissemination. Objective To encourage thinking about how to disseminate prevention programs broadly. Method We provide a real-world example of the implementation of two prevention programs. Results This paper illustrates the difficulties of recruiting for a disordered eating prevention intervention when offering minimal compensation despite the use of comprehensive and creative advertising. Conclusions These difficulties speak to the challenges in conducting widespread eating disorder prevention in university settings and highlight the need to develop strategies to help overcome challenges in prevention research and dissemination.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée
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    Rachel F Rodgers · Siân A McLean · Susan J Paxton
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    ABSTRACT: Sociocultural theory of body dissatisfaction posits that internalization of the media ideal and appearance comparison are predictors of body dissatisfaction, a key risk factor for eating disorders. However, no data exist regarding the longitudinal relationships between these variables. The aim of this study was to explore longitudinal relationships among internalization of the media-ideal, social appearance comparison, and body dissatisfaction. A sample of 277 Grade 7 school girls (M age = 12.77 years, SD = 0.44) completed measures of internalization of the media ideal, social appearance comparison, and body dissatisfaction at baseline, 8 months, and 14 months. Path analyses indicated that baseline internalization of the media ideal predicted social appearance comparison and body dissatisfaction at 8 months, and social appearance comparison at 8 months predicted body dissatisfaction at 14 months. A reciprocal effect emerged with body dissatisfaction at 8 months predicting internalization of the media ideal at 14 months. The findings inform sociocultural theory of body dissatisfaction, suggesting that internalization of the media ideal precedes and predicts appearance comparison and that body image interventions that target internalization of the media ideal, and social appearance comparison as well as body dissatisfaction are likely to be effective. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Developmental Psychology
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    ABSTRACT: Widely held stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward bulimic eating disorders may lead to self-blame and reduced treatment seeking. Knowledge and familiarity with mental disorders may help decrease associated stigma. However, these relationships are not well understood in bulimia nervosa (BN). A community sample of 1828 adults aged 18 to 70 years completed a survey assessing stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs toward BN, knowledge and familiarity with the disorder, as well as levels of eating disorder symptoms. Knowledge of BN was negatively associated with three dimensions of stigmatization, personal responsibility (ρ = -0.28), unreliability (ρ = -0.19), and advantages of BN (ρ = -0.23). Familiarity revealed no association with stigmatization. Both men and women with high levels of eating disorder symptoms perceived BN as less serious than the participants with low levels of symptoms. Increasing community knowledge about bulimia may help mitigate stigmatization and perceived barriers to treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease

Publication Stats

650 Citations
159.40 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012-2015
    • Northeastern University
      • Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2014
    • La Trobe University
      • School of Psychological Science
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • 2005-2013
    • University of Toulouse II - Le Mirail
      • UFR de Psychologie
      Tolosa de Llenguadoc, Midi-Pyrénées, France
  • 2004-2013
    • University of Toulouse
      Tolosa de Llenguadoc, Midi-Pyrénées, France