M Carola Zillikens

Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (119)1245.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Context: The role of uric acid (UA) in skeletal metabolism remains to be unraveled. Objective: We prospectively investigated the association between UA, bone mineral density at femoral neck (FN-BMD), hip bone geometry (HBG) parameters and incident fracture risk, and examined whether the associations were modified by age and vitamin C intake. Participants: and Setting: Data of 5,074 participants of The Rotterdam Study, a prospective population based cohort. Exposure: Serum UA was assessed at baseline. Main outcomes and measures: FN- BMD was measured at baseline, second, third and fourth visit of the Rotterdam Study. HBG parameters were measured at baseline, second and third visit. Results: Serum UA levels (per SD increase) were positively associated with FN-BMD (β=0.007 g/cm(2), 95%CI=0.002; 0.01), thicker cortices (β=0.002 cm, 95%CI=0.0003; 0.002) lower bone width (β=-0.013 cm, 95%CI=-0.23; -0.003) and lower cortical buckling ratio (β=-0.19, 95%CI=-0.33; -0.06). The effects of UA on FN-BMD and cortical buckling ratio tended to become stronger over time. Hazard Ratios and 95% confidence intervals per SD increase of baseline UA levels for the development of any type of incident fractures, non-vertebral fractures and osteoporotic fractures were 0.932 (0.86-0.995), 0.924 (0.856-0.998)) and 0.905 (0.849-0.982), respectively. These associations were more prominent in older individuals (65+) and in participants with high intakes of vitamin C (>median). Conclusions: Higher levels of serum UA are associated with higher BMD (at expense of thicker cortices and narrower bone diameters) and may be a protective factor in bone metabolism. However, interactions with age and vitamin C may be present.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially between men and women. To systematically screen for age- and/or sex-specific effects of genetic variants on BMI and WHRadjBMI, we performed meta-analyses of 114 studies (up to 320,485 individuals of European descent) with genome-wide chip and/or Metabochip data by the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) Consortium. Each study tested the association of up to ~2.8M SNPs with BMI and WHRadjBMI in four strata (men ≤50y, men >50y, women ≤50y, women >50y) and summary statistics were combined in stratum-specific meta-analyses. We then screened for variants that showed age-specific effects (G x AGE), sex-specific effects (G x SEX) or age-specific effects that differed between men and women (G x AGE x SEX). For BMI, we identified 15 loci (11 previously established for main effects, four novel) that showed significant (FDR<5%) age-specific effects, of which 11 had larger effects in younger (<50y) than in older adults (≥50y). No sex-dependent effects were identified for BMI. For WHRadjBMI, we identified 44 loci (27 previously established for main effects, 17 novel) with sex-specific effects, of which 28 showed larger effects in women than in men, five showed larger effects in men than in women, and 11 showed opposite effects between sexes. No age-dependent effects were identified for WHRadjBMI. This is the first genome-wide interaction meta-analysis to report convincing evidence of age-dependent genetic effects on BMI. In addition, we confirm the sex-specificity of genetic effects on WHRadjBMI. These results may provide further insights into the biology that underlies weight change with age or the sexually dimorphism of body shape.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · PLoS Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially between men and women. To systematically screen for age- and/or sex-specific effects of genetic variants on BMI and WHRadjBMI, we performed meta-analyses of 114 studies (up to 320,485 individuals of European descent) with genome-wide chip and/or Metabochip data by the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) Consortium. Each study tested the association of up to ~2.8M SNPs with BMI and WHRadjBMI in four strata (men 50y, men >50y, women 50y, women >50y) and summary statistics were combined in stratum-specific meta-analyses. We then screened for variants that showed age-specific effects (G x AGE), sex-specific effects (G x SEX) or age-specific effects that differed between men and women (G x AGE x SEX). For BMI, we identified 15 loci (11 previously established for main effects, four novel) that showed signifi- cant (FDR<5%) age-specific effects, of which 11 had larger effects in younger (<50y) than in older adults (!50y). No sex-dependent effects were identified for BMI. For WHRadjBMI, we identified 44 loci (27 previously established for main effects, 17 novel) with sex-specific effects, of which 28 showed larger effects in women than in men, five showed larger effects in men than in women, and 11 showed opposite effects between sexes. No age-dependent effects were identified for WHRadjBMI. This is the first genome-wide interaction meta-analy- sis to report convincing evidence of age-dependent genetic effects on BMI. In addition, we confirm the sex-specificity of genetic effects on WHRadjBMI. These results may provide further insights into the biology that underlies weight change with age or the sexually dimor- phism of body shape.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · PLoS Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To study the relationship between 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D serum levels and osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, hip, and hand in a meta-analysis, with updated and expanded results of our previous study. Methods: Pubmed was searched from February 1975 to December 2014 for articles assessing the relationship between vitamin D levels and OA. In our meta-analysis, 6 cross-sectional and 6 longitudinal studies were included. The number of subjects in these studies ranged from 99 to 1248 subjects. The latter 1248 subjects (58% women) were drawn from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study of the elderly. At baseline, 25(OH) vitamin D serum levels were measured and prevalent OA of knees, hips and hands was scored by the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. After a mean follow-up time was 8.4 years, incidence and progression of OA were assessed. Results: No clear association between vitamin serum levels and prevalent, incident or progressive knee, hip or hand OA was observed. The quality of most studies was low, and the results were conflicting. Meta-analysis of 3 cross-sectional studies on vitamin D levels and knee joint space narrowing (JSN) showed an increased risk of prevalent JSN with decreasing vitamin D levels (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.15-2.01). The association observed in the meta-analysis of 3 studies on low vitamin D levels and incident and progressive knee OA was not significant (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.97-1.92); however, when considering solely progressive knee OA, the risk was significantly increased (OR = 2.40, 95% CI: 1.22-4.72). Conclusions: Epidemiological studies do not provide evidence of an independent association between 25(OH) vitamin D serum levels with hip or hand OA. When analyzing subgroups of knee OA, significant associations of low vitamin D levels with prevalent knee JSN and with progressive knee OA were observed. Overall, the results of this study do not support the advice to supplement vitamin D to prevent the onset or worsening of osteoarthritis, except perhaps for progressive knee OA.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated homocysteine concentrations are associated with a decline in physical function in elderly persons. Homocysteine-lowering therapy may slow down this decline. This study aimed to examine the effect of a 2-year intervention of vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation on physical performance, handgrip strength, and risk of falling in elderly subjects in a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Participants aged ≥65 years with elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations [12-50 µmol/L (n = 2919)] were randomly assigned to daily supplementation of 500 µg vitamin B12, 400 µg folic acid, and 600 IU vitamin D3, or to placebo with 600 IU vitamin D3. Physical performance (range 0-12) and handgrip strength (kg) were measured at baseline and after 2 years. Falls were reported prospectively on a research calendar. Intention-to-treat (primary) and per-protocol (secondary) analyses were performed. Physical performance level and handgrip strength significantly decreased during the follow-up period, but this decline did not differ between groups. Moreover, time to first fall was not significantly different (HR: 1.0, 95 % CI 0.9-1.2). Secondary analyses on a per-protocol base identified an interaction effect with age on physical performance. In addition, the treatment was associated with higher follow-up scores on the walking test (cumulative OR: 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.5). Two-year supplementation of vitamin B12 and folic acid was neither effective in reducing the age-related decline in physical performance and handgrip strength, nor in the prevention of falling in elderly persons. Despite the overall null-effect, the results provide indications for a positive effect of the intervention on gait, as well as on physical performance among compliant persons >80 years. These effects should be further tested in future studies.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Calcified Tissue International
  • Ling Oei · M Carola Zillikens · Fernando Rivadeneira · Edwin H.G. Oei
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    ABSTRACT: Our understanding of the genetic control of skeletogenesis and bone remodeling is increasing, and in addition to various nongenetic risk factors, a positive family history confers an increased risk of fracture. Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures and they are often a first manifestation of osteoporosis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the genetic basis of osteoporotic vertebral fractures and, additionally, of structural vertebral deformities resembling osteoporotic vertebral fractures but which may have their own genetic basis. We conclude that, apart from tentative screening for rare monogenic forms of osteoporosis in very unusual case presentations, not enough is currently known to encourage routine genetic screening in regular osteoporotic vertebral fracture cases.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Clinical Densitometry
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    ABSTRACT: The extent to which low-frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 1-5%) and rare (MAF ≤ 1%) variants contribute to complex traits and disease in the general population is mainly unknown. Bone mineral density (BMD) is highly heritable, a major predictor of osteoporotic fractures, and has been previously associated with common genetic variants, as well as rare, population-specific, coding variants. Here we identify novel non-coding genetic variants with large effects on BMD (ntotal = 53,236) and fracture (ntotal = 508,253) in individuals of European ancestry from the general population. Associations for BMD were derived from whole-genome sequencing (n = 2,882 from UK10K (ref. 10); a population-based genome sequencing consortium), whole-exome sequencing (n = 3,549), deep imputation of genotyped samples using a combined UK10K/1000 Genomes reference panel (n = 26,534), and de novo replication genotyping (n = 20,271). We identified a low-frequency non-coding variant near a novel locus, EN1, with an effect size fourfold larger than the mean of previously reported common variants for lumbar spine BMD (rs11692564(T), MAF = 1.6%, replication effect size = +0.20 s.d., Pmeta = 2 × 10-14), which was also associated with a decreased risk of fracture (odds ratio = 0.85; P = 2 × 10-11; ncases = 98,742 and ncontrols = 409,511). Using an En1cre/flox mouse model, we observed that conditional loss of En1 results in low bone mass, probably as a consequence of high bone turnover. We also identified a novel low-frequency non-coding variant with large effects on BMD near WNT16 (rs148771817(T), MAF = 1.2%, replication effect size = +0.41 s.d., Pmeta = 1 × 10-11). In general, there was an excess of association signals arising from deleterious coding and conserved non-coding variants. These findings provide evidence that low-frequency non-coding variants have large effects on BMD and fracture, thereby providing rationale for whole-genome sequencing and improved imputation reference panels to study the genetic architecture of complex traits and disease in the general population.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Nature
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Despite frailty being an important geriatric syndrome, its prevalence and associated mortality risk in older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unknown. Methods: We examined the relationship between COPD confirmed by spirometry, COPD severity, and frailty defined by the Fried criteria within 2,142 participants (aged 74.7±5.6 years) of the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Results: The frailty prevalence was significantly higher (p < .001) in participants with COPD (10.2%, 95% CI: 7.6%-13.5%) compared with participants without COPD (3.4%, 95% CI: 2.6%-4.4%). Adjusted for age, sex, smoking, corticosteroids, and other confounders, participants with COPD had a more than twofold increased prevalence of frailty (odds ratio 2.2, 95% CI: 1.34-3.54, p = .002). The prevalence was highest when severe airflow limitation, dyspnea, and frequent exacerbations were present. Participants with mild airflow limitation were more frequently prefrail. COPD elderly who were frail had significant worse survival. Conclusions: This population-based cohort study in elderly demonstrates that COPD is associated with frailty even after adjusting for shared risk factors. Our findings suggest that frailty-in addition to COPD severity and comorbidities-identifies those COPD participants at high risk of mortality.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The Journals of Gerontology Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
  • Ling Oei · M. Carola Zillikens · Fernando Rivadeneira · Edwin H.G. Oei
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    ABSTRACT: Our understanding of the genetic control of skeletogenesis and bone remodeling is expanding, and normally, bone resorption and bone formation are well balanced through regulation by hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. Osteoporosis is considered a systemic disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue. Consequent increased bone fragility results in higher fracture risk. The most common osteoporotic fractures are located in the spine, and they form a significant health issue. A large variety of systemic diseases are associated with risk of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, illustrating its multifactorial etiology. Prevalences of these conditions vary from common to extremely rare, and incidence peaks differ according to etiology. This review appreciates different aspects of osteoporotic vertebral fractures as part of systemic disease, including genetic, immunologic, inflammatory, metabolic, and endocrine pathways. It seems impossible to be all-comprehensive on this topic; nevertheless, we hope to provide a reasonably thorough overview. Plenty remains to be elucidated in this field, identifying even more associated diseases and further exposing pathophysiological mechanisms underlying osteoporotic vertebral fractures.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Clinical Densitometry
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    ABSTRACT: No diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD) in the elderly. Our aims were (a) to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b) to examine the association of the BMD-Diet Score and the Healthy Diet Indicator, a score based on guidelines of the World Health Organization, with BMD in Dutch elderly participating in a prospective cohort study, the Rotterdam Study (n = 5144). Baseline dietary intake, assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, was categorized into food groups. Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score. BMD was measured repeatedly and was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD-Diet Score considered intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, legumes/beans and dairy products as "high-BMD" components and meat and confectionary as "low-BMD" components. After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval) = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012) g/cm(2) per standard deviation). This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator. The food groups included in our BMD-Diet Score could be considered in the development of future dietary guidelines for healthy ageing.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Nutrients
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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent and has been associated with many diseases. It has been suggested that vitamin D has effects on the immune system and inhibits inflammation. The aim of our study was to investigate whether vitamin D has an inhibitory effect on systemic inflammation by assessing the association between serum levels of vitamin D and C-reactive protein. We studied the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and C-reactive protein through linear regression in 9,649 participants of the Rotterdam Study, an observational, prospective population-based cohort study. We used genetic variants related to vitamin D and CRP to compute a genetic risk score and perform bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis. In linear regression adjusted for age, sex, cohort and other confounders, natural log-transformed CRP decreased with 0.06 (95% CI: -0.08, -0.03) unit per standard deviation increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Bi-directional Mendelian randomization analyses showed no association between the vitamin D genetic risk score and lnCRP (Beta per SD = -0.018; p = 0.082) or the CRP genetic risk score and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (Beta per SD = 0.001; p = 0.998). In conclusion, higher levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein. In this study we did not find evidence for this to be the result of a causal relationship.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: The association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and bone health remains unclear. We aimed to study the association between MS and hip bone geometry (HBG), femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD), and the risk of osteoporosis and incident fractures. Data of 2040 women and 1510 men participants in the third visit (1997–1999) of the Rotterdam Study (RSI-3), a prospective population based cohort, were available (mean follow-up 6.7 years). MS was defined according to the recent harmonized definition. HBG parameters were measured at the third round visit whereas FN-BMD was assessed at the third round and 5 years later. Incident fractures were identified from medical registry data. After correcting for age, body mass index (BMI), lifestyle factors and medication use, individuals with MS had lower bone width (β = -0.054, P = 0.003), lower cortical buckling ratio (β = -0.81, P = 0.003) and lower odds of having osteoporosis (odds ratio =0.56, P = 0.007) in women but not in men. Similarly, MS was associated with higher FN-BMD only in women (β = 0.028, P=0.001). In the analyses of MS components, the glucose component (unrelated to diabetes status) was positively associated with FN-BMD in both genders (β = 0.016, P = 0.01 for women and β = 0.022, P = 0.004 for men). In men, waist circumference was inversely associated with FN-BMD (β = -0.03, P = 0.004). No association was observed with fracture risk in either sex. In conclusion, women with MS had higher FN-BMD independent of BMI. The glucose component of MS was associated with high FN-BMD in both genders, highlighting the need to preserve glycemic control to prevent skeletal complications.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is highly heritable. Genetic variants showing robust associations with obesity traits have been identified through genome-wide association studies. We investigated whether a composite score representing healthy diet modifies associations of these variants with obesity traits. 32 BMI- and 14 waist-hip ratio (WHR)-associated SNPs were genotyped and genetic risk scores (GRS) calculated in 18 cohorts of European ancestry (n=68,317). Diet score was calculated based on self-reported intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, fried potatoes (unfavorable). Multi-variable adjusted, linear regression within each cohort, followed by inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to characterize: a) associations of each GRS with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR; b) diet score modification of genetic associations with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR. Nominally significant interactions (P=0.006-0.04) were observed between the diet score and WHR-GRS (but not BMI-GRS), two WHR loci (GRB14 rs10195252; LYPLAL1 rs4846567), and two BMI loci (LRRN6C rs10968576; MTIF3 rs4771122), for the respective BMI-adjusted WHR or BMI outcomes. Although the magnitudes of these select interactions were small, our data indicated that associations between genetic predisposition and obesity traits were stronger with a healthier diet. Our findings generate interesting hypotheses; however, experimental and functional studies are needed to determine their clinical relevance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Human Molecular Genetics
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    ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common chronic arrhythmia and it increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Still there is not a complete understanding of its etiology and underlying pathways. Vitamin D might regulate renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and might be involved in inflammation, both implicated in the pathophysiology of AF. The objective of this work was to investigate the association between vitamin D status with the risk of AF in the elderly. This study was conducted within the Rotterdam Study, a community-based cohort of middle-aged and elderly participants in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. We had 3,395 participants who were free of AF diagnosis at the start of our study and who had vitamin D data available. We analyzed the association between serum 25-hydroxivitamin D (25(OH)D) and incidence of AF using Cox regression models. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25(OH)D concentrations <50nmol/l, insufficiency between 50nmol/l and 75nmol/l, while serum 25(OH)D concentrations equal to and above 75nmol/l were considered as adequate. After mean follow-up of 12.0 years 263 (7.7%) participants were diagnosed with incident AF. Vitamin D status was not associated with AF in any of the 3 multivariate models tested (model adjusted for socio-demographic factors and life-style factors: HR per 10 unit increment in serum 25(OH)D 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.02; HR for insufficiency: 0.82, 95%CI: 0.60-1.11,and HR for adequate status: 0.76, 95%CI: 0.52-1.12 compared to deficiency). This prospective cohort study does not support the hypothesis that vitamin D status is associated with AF.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Middle-aged and elderly women constitute a large and growing proportion of the population. The peri and postmenopausal period constitutes a challenging transition time for women's health, and menopausal health is a crucial aspect in healthy and successful aging. Currently, no framework for the concept of healthy menopause exists, despite its recognized importance. Therefore, we aimed to: (i) characterize healthy menopause; (ii) identify aspects that contribute to it; and (iii) explore potential approaches to measure it. We propose healthy menopause as a dynamic state, following the permanent loss of ovarian function, which is characterized by self-perceived satisfactory physical, psychological and social functioning, incorporating disease and disability, allowing the attainment of a woman's desired ability to adapt and capacity to self-manage. The concept of healthy menopause applies to all women from the moment they enter the menopausal transition, up until they reach early and late postmenopause and includes women with spontaneous, iatrogenic, and premature menopause. This conceptualization can be considered as a further step in the maintenance and improvement of health in menopausal women from different perspectives, foremost the woman's own perspective, followed by the clinical, public health, and societal perspectives, and can be seen as a further step in delineating lines for future research. Furthermore, it could facilitate the improvement of adequate preventive and treatment strategies, guide scientific efforts, and aid education and communication to health care practitioners and the general public, allowing women the achievement of their potential and the fulfillment of their fundamental role in society. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Maturitas
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    ABSTRACT: High plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels are associated with increased osteoporotic fracture incidence. However, the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the effect of Hcy-lowering vitamin B12 and folic acid treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included participants aged ≥65 years with plasma Hcy levels between 12 and 50 µmol/L. The intervention comprised 2-year supplementation with either a combination of 500 µg B12, 400 µg folic acid, and 600 IU vitamin D or placebo with 600 IU vitamin D only. In total, 1111 participants underwent repeated dual-energy X-ray assessment and 1165 participants underwent QUS. Femoral neck (FN) BMD, lumbar spine (LS) BMD, calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and calcaneal speed of sound (SOS) were assessed. After 2 years, FN-BMD and BUA had significantly decreased, while LS-BMD significantly increased (all p < 0.01) and SOS did not change in either treatment arm. No statistically significant differences between the intervention and placebo group were present for FN-BMD (p = 0.24), LS-BMD (p = 0.16), SOS (p = 0.67), and BUA (p = 0.96). However, exploratory subgroup analyses revealed a small positive effect of the intervention on BUA at follow-up among compliant persons >80 years (estimated marginal mean 64.4 dB/MHz for the intervention group and 61.0 dB/MHz for the placebo group, p = 0.04 for difference). In conclusion, this study showed no overall effect of treatment with vitamin B12 and folic acid on BMD or QUS parameters in elderly, mildly hyperhomocysteinemic persons, but suggests a small beneficial effect on BUA in persons >80 years who were compliant in taking the supplement.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Calcified Tissue International
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    ABSTRACT: Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 x 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Nature
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    ABSTRACT: Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ∼2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Nature
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    Ling Oei · Fernando Rivadeneira · M. Carola Zillikens · Edwin H. G. Oei
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes and osteoporosis are both common diseases with increasing prevalences in the aging population. There is increasing evidence corroborating an association between diabetes mellitus and bone. This review will discuss the disease complications of diabetes on the skeleton, highlighting findings from epidemiological, molecular, and imaging studies in animal models and humans. Compared to control subjects, decreased bone mineral density (BMD) has been observed in type 1 diabetes mellitus, while on average, higher BMD has been found in type 2 diabetes; nonetheless, patients with both types of diabetes are seemingly at increased risk of fractures. Conventional diagnostics such as DXA measurements and the current fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) risk prediction algorithm for estimating risk of osteoporotic fractures are not sufficient in the case of diabetes. A deterioration in bone microarchitecture and an inefficient distribution of bone mass with insufficiency of repair and adaptation mechanisms appear to be factors of relevance. A highly complex and heterogeneous molecular pathophysiology underlies diabetes-related bone disease, involving hormonal, immune, and perhaps genetic pathways. The detrimental effects of chronically elevated glucose levels on bone should be added to the more well-known complications of diabetes.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Current Osteoporosis Reports
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular calcification has been associated inconsistently to low bone mineral density and fractures. The aims of the present study were to investigate the associations between coronary artery calcification (CAC) and BMD change, BMD and fracture risk in elderly subjects of the population-based Rotterdam Study. BMD was assessed through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and CAC through Electron-Beam Computed Tomography in 582 men and 694 women. We investigated the associations between BMD change (6.4 years follow-up) and CAC at follow-up and between BMD and CAC (measured simultaneously). In sensitivity analyses we stratified analyses for estradiol levels in women. The association between CAC and fracture risk (9 years follow-up) was tested through competing-risks models. Models were sex-stratified and adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking, bisphosphonate use and age at menopause. There was no association between BMD change and CAC in men. In women, each 1% increase in annual BMD loss was significantly associated with higher follow-up CAC [β = 0.22 (0.06-0.38), p=0.006; prevalence ratio: 4%]. Stratified analyses showed significant associations between BMD loss and follow-up CAC only in women with lower estradiol levels. We found no association between CAC and fracture risk and no association between BMD and CAC cross-sectionally. BMD loss was associated with higher follow-up CAC in women, which might be related to low estrogen levels. No association between CAC and BMD or fracture risk was found. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms that might underlie the association between BMD change and coronary calcification in women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Atherosclerosis

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,245.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2015
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
    • Erasmus University Rotterdam
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Endocrinology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2014
    • Albert Schweitzer Ziekenhuis
      Dordt, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2013
    • Lund University
      • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden