James H. Price

University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, United States

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Publications (217)254.97 Total impact

  • James H. Price · Erica Payton
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    ABSTRACT: Women in the United States are 11 times more likely to be murdered with a firearm than are women in other high-income countries. Women are 9 times more likely to be killed by an intimate partner than by a stranger. Firearms are more likely to be present in the homes of battered women. We analyzed articles published from 2000 through the end of 2014 in the three leading journals that focused broadly on women's health issues: Journal of Women's Health; Women and Health; and Women's Health Issues, for articles addressing firearm violence against women. Subsequently, we review the intimate partner firearm violence literature and four potential policy options to reduce this violence. The three leading journals that focus broadly on women's health issues have not adequately addressed firearm violence against women in the past 15 years. Intimate partner violence led to 668 firearm suicides and 1,738 firearm homicides in 2010. This level of firearm violence can be reduced by banning convicted abusers, stalkers, and those with restraining orders from possessing firearms; increasing reporting by states of records that indicate who is a domestic abuser; requiring background checks on all firearm sales; and requiring domestic abusers surrender their firearms to authorities. Intimate partner violence often results in fatal firearm violence. Using a public health approach, there are policies that should be changed at both the state and federal levels that can significantly reduce firearm violence against women.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016
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    James H. Price · Jagdish Khubchandani

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2016
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    James H Price · Jagdish Khubchandani
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    ABSTRACT: Hispanics constitute the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the United States and are the fastest growing segment of the population. Knowledge about health needs and practices, effective health promotion programs, and health policy making for Hispanics has the potential to improve population health outcomes for this group. Continued research and practice literature will aid in accomplishing these objectives. However, little is known about the extent of health education–related literature available on Hispanic health issues. In this review, we analyzed research and practice publications in all health education–related journals to assess the volume of articles published on Hispanic health issues. We found that the portion of journal articles devoted to Hispanic health issues varied widely among the journals and that there was a very limited emphasis on Hispanic health–related issues. Journal editors and editorial board members may need to be more proactive in soliciting manuscripts on Hispanic health, and our practitioners may have to improve their professional skills and cultural competence in order to work with Hispanic populations to produce research and practice literature that is of adequate quantity and quality to help improve Hispanics’ health.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Health Promotion Practice
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    ABSTRACT: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of a national sample of secondary school principals regarding reducing firearm violence in high schools. Data were collected via three-wave postal mailings. A 59-item valid and reliable questionnaire was mailed to a national random sample of 800 secondary school principals. Of the 349 principals (46 %) that responded, 17 % reported a firearm incident at their school in the past 5 years. Principals perceived inadequate parental monitoring (70 %), inadequate mental health services (64 %), peer harassment/bullying (59 %), and easy access to firearms (50 %) as the main causes of firearm violence in schools. The three barriers to implementing firearm violence prevention practices were: lack of expertise as to which practices to implement (33 %), lack of time (30 %), and lack of research as to which practices are most effective (30 %). Less than half of schools trained school personnel regarding firearm violence issues. The findings indicate that firearm incidents at schools may be more common than previously thought. A significant portion of principals are at a loss as to what to implement because of a lack of empirical evidence on what is effective. More research is needed to find the most effective school interventions for reducing firearm violence.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Community Health
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    Jagdish Khubchandani · James H. Price
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    ABSTRACT: Most research on workplace harassment originates from European countries.Prevalence of workplace harassment and associated morbidity has not been well studied in the United States. The purpose of this study was to assess in a sample of US workers the prevalence of workplace harassment and the psychological and physical health consequences of workplace harassment. The 2010 National Health Interview Survey data were analyzed in 2014 for this study. We computed the prevalence of workplace harassment, assessed the demographic and background characteristics of victims of harassment, and tested the association between harassment and selected health risk factors by using logistic regression analysis. Statistical significance was established as p < 0.01. A total of 17,524 adults were included in our study (51.5 % females and 74.9 % Whites). A little <1 in 10 (8.1 %) reported being harassed in the workplace in the past 12 months. The odds of harassment were significantly higher for females (OR 1.47, p < 0.001),multiracial individuals (OR 2.30, p < 0.001), and divorced or separated individuals (OR 1.88, p < 0.001). Victims of harassment were significantly more likely to: be obese, sleep less, and smoke more. In addition, harassment was associated with psychosocial distress, pain disorders, work loss, bed days, and worsening health of employees in the past 12 months. Analysis was stratified by gender and distinct health risk patterns for men and women victims were observed. Workplace harassment in the US is associated with significant health risk factors and morbidity. Workplace policies and protocols can play a significant role in reducing harassment and the associated negative health outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Community Health
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    James H Price · Jagdish Khubchandani · Erica Payton
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    ABSTRACT: In the past three decades, approximately 1 million Americans have been killed with firearms and over 2 million have been injured with firearms. Firearm violence is one of the top 10 causes of premature mortality for racial/ethnic minorities and youths 1 to 19 years of age. However, firearm violence issues are virtually absent in the past 15 years in health education-related journals. We provide several examples of areas of health education where firearm violence is congruent with the professional responsibilities of health educators. Finally, we encourage health educators to become involved in firearm violence research and health education-related journal leaders to become more proactive in soliciting manuscripts that address firearm violence-related issues. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Health Promotion Practice
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    ABSTRACT: Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods instructors at school health preparation programs were surveyed. A total of 138 completed surveys (61%) were returned. The topics taught in school health education methods courses emphasized the most included aligning objectives, instruction, and assessment (79%); development of lesson plans (73%); teaching methods that engage learners (72%); and application of the National Health Education Standards and performance indicators (69%). The content taught and how the instructors assessed their students differed statistically by 1 or more of the following: whether they had a health education degree, had experience teaching in the public schools, and if their program was accredited. This study provides information regarding what school health methods instructors across the United States are teaching in their classes. Using this information as a baseline can serve as a guide for preservice faculty teaching a school health methods course. © 2015, American School Health Association.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of School Health
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the preferences of parents of elementary school-aged children regarding when sexuality topics should be discussed in school and at home. The survey was mailed to a national random sample of parents of elementary school age children. Overall, 92% of parents believed that sexuality education should be taught in schools. Independent t-tests showed statistically significant differences between mothers and fathers regarding when sexuality education topics should be taught in elementary school as well as when they planned to discuss sexuality topics at home with their child. This study provides valuable information regarding parents’ perceptions about sexuality education.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · American Journal of Sexuality Education
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    ABSTRACT: Firearm mortality is the leading cause of death for young African American males, however, few studies have focused on racial/ethnic minority populations and firearm violence. The National Black Caucus of State Legislators advocates for legislation that promotes the health of African Americans. Thus, the purpose of this study was to collect baseline data on African American legislators' perceptions regarding firearm violence in the African American community. A cross-sectional study of African American legislators (n = 612) was conducted to investigate the research questions. Of the 612 questionnaires mailed, 12 were not deliverable, and 170 were returned (28 %). Utilizing a three wave mailing process, African American legislators were invited to participate in the study. The majority (88 %) of respondents perceived firearm violence to be very serious among African Americans. Few (10 %) legislators perceived that addressing legislative issues would be an effective strategy in reducing firearm violence among African Americans. The majority (72 %) of legislators perceived the most effective strategy to reducing firearm violence in the African American community should focus on addressing societal issues (e.g. crime and poverty). After adjusting for the number of perceived barriers, the number of perceived benefits was a significant predictor of legislators' perceived effectiveness of firearm violence prevention legislation for 8 of the 24 potential firearm violence prevention legislative bills.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Community Health
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the perceptions and practices of a national sample of college and university presidents regarding their support for concealed carry on college campuses. Participants: The sample for this study consisted of a national random sample of 900 college or university presidents. Methods: In the Spring of 2013, a 3-wave mailing procedure was used to ensure an adequate response rate to a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: The response rate was 46%, more than what was needed based on the power analysis. The vast majority (95%) of respondents were not supportive of carrying concealed handguns on campuses. They perceived there to be more disadvantages than advantages to handguns on campus. However, college administrators were not focused enough on the primary prevention of campus firearm trauma. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest a number of activities that could be implemented to enhance safety on college and university campuses.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of American College Health
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to develop an Attribution of Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities (AREHD) scale. A convenience sample of undergraduate college students (n = 423) at four Midwestern universities was recruited to respond to the survey. A pilot test with undergraduate students (n = 23) found the survey had good acceptability and readability level (SMOG = 11th grade). Using exploratory factor analysis we found the two a priori subscales were confirmed: individual responsibility and social determinants. Internal reliabilities of the subscales were: individual responsibility (alpha = 0.87) and social determinants (alpha = 0.90). Test-retest stability reliabilities were: individual responsibility (r = 0.72) and social determinants (r = 0.69). The AREHD subscales are satisfactory for assessing college student's AREHD.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Journal of Community Health
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    ABSTRACT: Firearms injuries place a unique burden on America in terms of lives lost (31,000/year), disability (70,000 nonfatal injuries/year), and economic costs ($174 billion in 2010). The purpose of this study was to examine psychiatric residency directors' perceptions of firearm access issues of the mentally ill. In late Fall 2012 and early Spring of 2013, a three-wave mailing was used to survey the membership of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (N = 129). Due to the homogenous small sample size descriptive statistics were calculated to describe the responses. A total of 72 (56 %) directors responded. Almost 1 in 4 (23.6 %) thought that access to firearms by the seriously mentally ill should not be prohibited. The majority (91.7 %) supported closing the background check loophole. The majority (54.2 %) also believed that singling out the mentally ill as a group of "banned purchasers" adds to the stigma of the mentally ill (54.2 %) but a plurality (44.4 %) did not believe reporting the mentally ill to authorities would result in the mentally ill avoiding treatment. The current method of reducing access by the mentally ill to firearms is perceived by psychiatric residency directors as ineffective and burdensome to the mentally ill.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of Community Health
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    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive review of the literature failed to find any studies to assess elementary school parents' preferred philosophical approach to teaching sexuality education and sexuality education topics discussed by parents. All previous research reported parent data for grades K-12 or grades 9-12 only. Methods A random sample of 2400 parents of children ages 6 to 11 across 3 counties of a Midwestern state were surveyed using a 3-wave mailing, which resulted in a final response rate of 43% from eligible parents. Results When asked to identify which of 3 sexuality education topics should be taught at specific grade levels, a plurality (36%) thought that the reproductive system should be taught in grades 3-5. Most parents (51%) supported teaching abstinence and refusal skills in grades 6-8 and supported teaching birth control and condom use (55%) in the middle school grades or earlier. Discussion Multiple factors come into play when schools decide what sexuality education topics to include in the curriculum, including politics, moral philosophy of adults, resources, and research evidence. The results of this study support comprehensive sexuality education. Translation to Health Education Practice Health education teachers should advocate for quality sexuality education in the middle school grades or earlier.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Background: College campuses have traditionally been gun-free zones, efforts are underway by pro-gun organizations to change policies to allow the carrying of concealed handguns on university campuses. Purpose: To assess the perception and practices of university presidents regarding support for carrying concealed handguns on their campuses. Methods: Only institutions classified as four-year private for profit, private not-for-profit, and public institutions were included. An a priori power analysis indicated a suggested sample size of 338 participants to yield sufficient power. As a result, to obtain generalizability power, surveys were mailed to a national random sample of 900. A four-page, survey instrument was developed to assess perceptions and practices regarding the carrying of concealed firearms on college campuses (five point Likert-type response scale). A 3-wave postal mailing was sent using a variety of techniques to maximize response rate. Survey data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: 324 presidents (36%) responded. They were not supportive of faculty carrying handguns on campus (96%); would feel less safe if they did carry (85%), increase firearm homicides on campus (76%); 84% have an active shooter plan in place and 45% have trained faculty on active shooter situations. Multivariable logistic regression found males gender, political affiliation (Republican), growing up in home with firearms were independent predictors of support for carrying firearms on campus. Conclusions: University presidents are not supportive of concealed handguns on campus and their responses are congruent with regional studies of faculty and students.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Nov 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Racial/ethnic minorities are 1.5 to 2.0 times more likely than whites to have most of the major chronic diseases. Chronic diseases are also more common in the poor than the nonpoor and this association is frequently mediated by race/ethnicity. Specifically, children are disproportionately affected by racial/ethnic health disparities. Between 1960 and 2005 the percentage of children with a chronic disease in the United States almost quadrupled with racial/ethnic minority youth having higher likelihood for these diseases. The most common major chronic diseases of youth in the United States are asthma, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, dental disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, mental illness, cancers, sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and a variety of genetic and other birth defects. This review will focus on the psychosocial rather than biological factors that play important roles in the etiology and subsequent solutions to these health disparities because they should be avoidable and they are inherently unjust. Finally, this review examines access to health services by focusing on health insurance and dental insurance coverage and access to school health services.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · BioMed Research International
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    ABSTRACT: The leading cause of preventable death, in the most vulnerable segments of society, whom social workers often counsel, is cigarette smoking. The purpose of this study was to assess tobacco smoking cessation training in clinical social work programs. A valid 21-item questionnaire was sent to the entire population of 189 clinical graduate social work programs identified by the Council on Social Work Education. A three-wave mailing process was used to maximize the return rate. Directors from 112 clinical social work programs returned completed questionnaires (61 percent). The majority (91 percent) of directors reported having never thought about offering formal smoking cessation training, and only nine of the programs (8 percent) currently provided formal smoking cessation education. The three leading barriers to offering smoking cessation education were as follows: not a priority (60 percent), not enough time (55 percent), and not required by the accrediting body (41 percent). These findings indicate that clinical social work students are not receiving standardized smoking cessation education to assist in improving the well-being of their clients. The national accrediting body for graduate clinical social work programs should consider implementing guidelines for smoking cessation training in the curriculums.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Health & social work
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: This multisite study assessed college student's perceptions and practices regarding carrying concealed handguns on campus. Participants: Undergraduate students from 15 public midwestern universities were surveyed (N = 1,800). Methods: Faculty members distributed the questionnaire to students in general education classes or classes broadly representative of undergraduate students. Results: Useable questionnaires were returned by 1,649 students (92%). The majority (78%) of students was not supportive of concealed handguns on campuses, and 78% claimed that they would not obtain a permit to carry a handgun on campus, if it were legal. Those who perceived more disadvantages to carrying handguns on campus were females, who did not own firearms, did not have a firearm in the home growing up, and were not concerned with becoming a victim of crime. Conclusions: The majority of students was not supportive of concealed handguns on campus and claimed that they would not feel safer if students and faculty carried concealed handguns.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Journal of American College Health
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    ABSTRACT: —Background: Several professional medical societies advocate for firearm safety counseling with pa-tients. Little is known about Emergency Physicians' prac-tices and perceptions of firearm safety counseling. Objective: To assess Emergency Physicians' beliefs regard-ing firearm control and their confidence in counseling pa-tients on firearm safety. Methods: A national random sample (n = 500) of the members of the American College of Emergency Physicians was sent a valid and reliable ques-tionnaire on firearm safety counseling. Results: Of the 278 (56.8%) responding physicians, those who were non-white and those who were not members of the National Rifle Asso-ciation (NRA) perceived firearm violence to be more of a problem than white physicians and those who were mem-bers of the NRA. The majority did not believe that patients would view them as a good source of information on firearm safety (63.3%) or that patients would accept them providing anticipatory firearm safety guidance (56.5%). The majority of the Emergency Department physicians did not believe firearm safety counseling would impact firearm-related ho-micides (75.2%) or suicides (70%). Conclusions: The vast majority of Emergency Physicians had never been formally trained regarding firearm safety counseling, did not believe patients would see them as credible sources, and did not be-lieve that anticipatory guidance on firearm safety would have any impact. These data may help inform Emergency Medicine residency programs on the training needs of residents regarding anticipatory guidance on firearm safety. Ó 2013 Elsevier Inc.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · Journal of Emergency Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: The Health Belief Model was utilized to examine the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of individuals regarding regular jogging. Based on an elicitation procedure developed by Martin Fishbein, a questionnaire was developed according to the theoretical tenets of the Health Belief Model and was found to be valid and reliable. Responses from 124 joggers and 96 nonexercisers were analyzed, and significant differences were found. Factors which accounted for the largest portion of predictable variance (40%) were barriers to action such as lack of time, job or family responsibilities, or weather constraints. As a whole, the results provided support for the Health Belief Model in that 61% of the variance in jogging behavior was determined. The study suggests that physical and health educators might more effectively change the behavior of sedentary individuals by utilizing strategies which address perceived obstacles to jogging.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Research quarterly for exercise and sport
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    ABSTRACT: Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N = 750). A valid and reliable survey instrument was developed and a 3-wave postal mailing procedure was used to maximize the return rate (57%). Results: Most school nurses (86.4%) reported that they did not have a protocol in their schools to respond to an incident of ADV. The majority of nurses reported that in the past 2 years, training to assist victims of ADV had not been provided to personnel in their schools (88.1%) and their schools did not conduct periodic student surveys that include questions on teen dating abuse behaviors (71.5%). Nurses who had a school protocol for responding to an incident of ADV perceived significantly fewer barriers to assisting victims of ADV and assisted more victims. Over half (55.3%) of high school nurses reported assisting a victim of ADV in the past 2 years. Conclusion: Nurses appear to need more training in ADV. In addition, nurses found a number of barriers (eg, lack of training on ADV, lack of time, and lack of private space) to assisting student victims of ADV. Schools need to establish a means for assessing the status of ADV in their student population. Schools also need to provide in-service education for school personnel regarding prevention, assessment, and interdiction of ADV.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2013 · Journal of School Health

Publication Stats

3k Citations
254.97 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1983-2015
    • University of Toledo
      • • Department of Health and Recreation Professions
      • • Department of Political Science and Public Administration
      Toledo, Ohio, United States
  • 2011-2013
    • Ball State University
      • Department of Physiology and Health Science
      Muncie, Indiana, United States
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2004
    • Mississippi State University
      Mississippi, United States
  • 2003
    • Wayne State University
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • 1999
    • University of North Carolina at Charlotte
      Charlotte, North Carolina, United States
  • 1996
    • Mercy College of Northwest Ohio
      Toledo, Ohio, United States